Helenius RK Series

Notes: The APH RK-97 is a single-shot heavy rifle designed in two versions chambered so that exports will be attractive to virtually any country in the world. Externally, both versions look identical, with a semi-bullpup-type layout (some of the action is in the stock, but some is more towards the center and some in forward of the pistol grip). The stock is of light alloy that is essentially the bare minimum required to enclose the part of the action which is in the stock; attached to this is a raised synthetic shell-type cheekpiece and a padded buttplate. At the front of the forward portion of the receiver is a folding bipod of fixed height; however, the bipod can be partially-folded and locked at different angles, providing a modicum of height adjustment. The very long 44.4-inch barrel is made from heavy steel, and is tipped with a large pepperpot muzzle brake. The muzzle brake can also be removed, revealing threads which can be used with most of the (very few) suppressors available for the ammunition the APH RK-97 fires. The APH RK-97 has no factory-installed iron sights, though it does have attachments points for them; the APH RK-97 is meant to be used with telescopic sights. A scope is attached to standard ring-type mounts, which are mounted on a bracket which attaches to either side of the weapon above the pistol grip.

The strangest part of the APH RK-97 is its vertical dropping breech block operation. The APH RK-97 is breech-loaded, but the action is operated by moving the foregrip in sort of a pump-action. The fore-end is pushed forward, opening the action and allowing the shooter to load a cartridge; then the fore-end is pulled back, raising and locking the breech block.

The APH RK-20 is essentially the APH RK-97 scaled-up to fire a much larger round the World War 2-vintage Russian 20x99mm ShVAK cartridge (originally designed to be fired from aircraft-mounted cannons of the period; the cartridge is known to the Finns as the 20x100mm Swak). Other than the larger size of the action, receiver, the diameter of the barrel (even though the barrel is much shorter at 33.9 inches), and a larger and heavier pepperpot muzzle brake, the APH RK-20 is essentially identical in design to the APH RK-97.

The RK-99 is essentially an updated, magazine-fed version of the APH RK-97; externally, it looks a bit different, with a more squared receiver and action housing, and the shorter 32.4-inch barrel. Internally, of course, the RK-99 is very different than the APH RK-97, due to its repeating action; when the "pump" action is used, a round is pulled into the chamber and the action locks via a rotating bolt; after firing, the spent round is ejected normally, like that of the APH RK-97. The 5-round magazine is standard; 10-round magazines are available, but tend to present a "third leg" problem due to the size of the magazine and the bullpup layout, and are therefore not normally used. The RK-99 was not introduced until 2000, as opposed to the APH RK-97 and APH RK-20, which were introduced in late 1997.

More or less related to the RK-99 is the RK-99MK1. The RK-99MK1 is a single-shot rifle, but actuating the "pump" mechanism drops the entire bolt carrier assembly out of the bottom of the receiver; the bolt carrier includes a shell holder for the cartridge. After inserting the cartridge, the bolt carrier assembly is re-inserted into the receiver and the "pump" slide pulled back to lock it into position. After firing, the bolt carrier is again dropped out of the rifle, with the expended shell being ejected separately. This operation allows more positive locking and greater reliability in a single-shot weapon, as well as allowing greater flexibility in using different ammunition types, but also greatly slows down the reloading of the weapon. The RK-99MK2 is basically identical to the RK-99MK1 (except for the changes required for the different caliber and a shorter 31.5-inch barrel), but is chambered for the 20mm ShVAK cartridge.

Twilight 2000 Notes: The APH RK-97 and APH RK-20 were not known to be used outside of Finland in the Twilight 2000 timeline; even in Finnish service, they are rarities. The RK-99, RK-99MK1 and RK-99MK2 do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Merc 2000 Notes: The APH-RK-97 is a big seller around the world, particularly chambered in .50 Browning Machinegun; the APH RK-20 is less popular, mostly due to the greater weight, recoil, and relatively limited applications. The RK-99 is even more popular than the APH RK-97; the RK-99MK1 and RK-99MK2, less so than even the APH RK-97 and APH RK-20.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

APH RK-97

12.7mm Russian

14.02 kg

1 Internal

$7209

APH RK-97

.50 Browning Machinegun

13.58 kg

1 Internal

$6996

APH RK-20

20mm ShVAK

22.5 kg

1 Internal

$9300

RK-99

12.7mm Russian

12.02 kg

5, 10

$8360

RK-99

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.64 kg

5, 10

$7937

RK-99MK1

12.7mm Russian

12.02 kg

1 Internal

$5013

RK-99MK1

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.64 kg

1 Internal

$4799

RK-99MK2

20mm ShVAK

20 kg

1 Internal

$9216

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

APH RK-97 (12.7mm)

SS

10

2-2-3

11

3

Nil

187

(With Bipod)

SS

10

2-2-3

11

2

Nil

244

APH RK-97 (.50)

SS

10

2-2-3

10

3

Nil

200

(With Bipod)

SS

10

2-2-3

10

2

Nil

260

APH RK-20 (API)

SS

14

3/-1/-3*

10

3

Nil

176

(With Bipod)

SS

14

3/-1/-3*

10

2

Nil

228

APH RK-20 (HE)

SS

C1 B4

-5C

10

3

Nil

146

(With Bipod)

SS

C1 B4

-5C

10

2

Nil

190

RK-99 (12.7mm)

BA

9

2-3-4

11

3

Nil

117

(With Bipod)

BA

9

2-3-4

11

1

Nil

152

RK-99 (.50)

BA

9

2-3-4

10

3

Nil

125

(With Bipod)

BA

9

2-3-4

10

1

Nil

163

RK-99MK1 (12.7mm)

1/2

9

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

117

(With Bipod)

1/2

9

2-3-4

8

1

Nil

152

RK-99MK1 (.50)

1/2

9

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

125

(With Bipod)

1/2

9

2-3-4

8

1

Nil

163

RK-99MK2 (API)

1/2

14

3/-1/-3*

9

3

Nil

157

(With Bipod)

1/2

14

3/-1/-3*

9

2

Nil

204

RK-99MK2 (HE)

1/2

C1 B4

-5C

9

3

Nil

131

(With Bipod)

1/2

C1 B4

-5C

9

2

Nil

170

*Penetration against personnel is 2-2-3.

Lahti m/39 Antitank Rifle

Notes: Not a sniper rifle in the strictest sense, the m/39 was used as one many cases, typically to take out the vision blocks or put holes in gun barrels of armored vehicles. It was derived directly from the Lahti m/37 aircraft cannon, and as little modification as possible was made to turn it into a shoulder arm. Most of these weapons were adapted to bolt-action, but some kept their automatic mechanisms, something guaranteed to generate brutal recoil, especially considering that only a thin rubber recoil pad separated the firer from the very rudimentary stock. Perhaps the most unusual feature is the bipod, complete with a set of skis.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Lahti m/39 (Bolt-Action)

20mm Long Solothurn

42.1 kg

10

$21796

Lahti m/39 (Automatic)

20mm Long Solothurn

42.1 kg

10

$16228

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

m/39 (AP)

BA

17

2-2-2 (2/1/1/0)

14

6

Nil

311

m/39 (AP, Bipod)

BA

17

2-2-2 (2/1/1/0)

14

3

Nil

404

m/39 (HEI)

BA

C1 B6

-4C

14

6

Nil

229

m/39 (HEI, Bipod)

BA

C1 B6

-4C

14

3

Nil

300

m/39 (AP)

5

17

2-2-2 (2/1/1/0)

14

5

14

283

m/39 (AP, Bipod)

5

17

2-2-2 (2/1/1/0)

14

3

7

367

m/39 (HEI)

5

C1 B6

-4C

14

5

14

208

m/39 (HEI, Bipod)

5

C1 B6

-4C

14

3

7

272