The magazines presented here are based on light alloy magazines.  For steel magazines, increase weight by 2%; for plastic or synthetic magazines; decrease weight by 8 percent.

 

 

2.7mm Kolibri

     Notes:  This round was the smallest commercially-manufactured centerfire round ever made.  It was used in the Kolibri pistol until 1914, when it was replaced by the 3mm Kolibri round.  It is an obsolete round, and a collector’s item that in real life would fetch thousands of times the game price shown here.  It was designed for ladies’ self defense, but the wounds it causes are equally tiny, and it has no real practical value other than target practice.  Virtually any 2.7mm Kolibri round today would be handloaded.

     Nominal Size: 2.7x9mm

     Actual Size: 2.72x9.4mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 0.04 per box of 100; Price: $20 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0004 kg

5-round box: 0.004 kg

 

 

 

3mm Kolibri

     Notes: This round, build for a ladies’ defense pistol at the turn of the 20th century, is a tiny, low-power round that often does little more than annoying damage.  The case is generally so thin that it is impractical to reload them, and the round typically uses an unjacketed lead bullet.  These items are now a collectors’ item.

     Nominal Size: 3x8mm

     Actual Size: 3.05x8.13mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:   0.06 kg per box of 100; Price $20 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0005 kg

5-round box: 0.06 kg

 

 

 

4.6mm Radway

  Originally designed for use in Heckler & Koch’s MP-7 PDW, the 4.6mm Radway round is now also going to be chambered in a new Heckler in Koch pistol, the UCP.  The 4.6mm Radway was developed by Heckler & Koch’s partners at BAE’s Radway Green facilities, based on the 1960s 4.6x36mm löffelspitz round developed for the abortive HK-36 assault rifle.  The 4.6mm Radway round has high velocity and decent range, but the effectiveness and knockdown power of such a tiny round (the standard round weight is only 2.6 grams) is debatable, even though it has been proven that the 4.6mm Radway round yaws violently upon striking flesh.  The standard ball round uses a jacketed lead-antimony alloy bullet, and this is what is referred to for the price below.  The German Army does not typically use the standard ball round, using the DM-11 Penetrator instead.  The DM-11 Penetrator uses a brass-jacketed steel-cored round that is loaded with a bit more propellant and is a bit more aerodynamically efficient in shape.  This results in better penetration and range.  German Police often use the Action Law Enforcement round, which is basically the same as the standard ball round but has the harder brass jacket of the DM-11 round.  The DM-11 Penetrator has a one-step increase in penetration; The ALE has sort of a “half-step increase (split the difference). The DM-11 round costs 3 times the standard ball ammo cost; the Action Law Enforcement costs twice the standard ball ammunition price.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The 4.6mm Radway round does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Other Names: 4.6mm HK PDW

     Nominal Size: 4.6x30mm

     Actual Size: 4.5x30.07mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 8 kg per case of 1000; Price: $380 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.007 kg

20-round box: 0.23 kg

40-round box: 0.44 kg

 

 

5.45mm Russian Short

     Notes: Originally developed for the PSM pistol, this cartridge is considered a poor round by most Western experts.  It is, however, more effective against body armor than its size and energy would otherwise indicate.  The bullet is jacketed, and has a steel front half and lead rear half.

     Other Names: 5.45mm Soviet Pistol, 5.45mm Short Russian

     Nominal Size: 5.45x18mm

     Actual Size: 5.33x17.78mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight:  5 kg per case of 1000; Price $80 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.004 kg

8-round box: 0.06 kg

24-round box: 0.16 kg

 

 

5.5mm Velo Dog

     Notes: This round was introduced in 1894, designed to be fired from the French Velo Dog revolver.  The revolver passed out of favor quickly, but a number of Belgian and German revolvers also chambered the round over the years, and it was manufactured by several countries up to 1940.  Today, only Fiocchi of Italy makes the 5.5mm Velo Dog round.  It is a round that has little more power than a .22 Long Rifle round; the 5.5mm Velo Dog was designed to do little more than allow bicyclists to scare off aggressive dogs (hence the name). 

     Other Names: 5.75mm Velo Dog

     Nominal Size: 5.5x29mm

     Actual Size: 5.72x28.45mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 0.68 kg per box of 100; Price: $22 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.005 kg

 

 

 

 

5.56mm Pindad

     Notes: The 5.56mm Pindad round is essentially a shortened 5.56mm NATO round – both in case and bullet.  The result is a round that produces decent damage and penetration superior to most pistol rounds, it a manner to other short PDW rounds like the 5.7mm FN and 4.6mm Radway.  The 5.56mm Pindad and the pistol (the Pindad PS-01 Serbu) was first shown in prototype form at the 2008 Indo-Defence Expo & Forum, and I have not been able to find out whether it has entered production as of yet.  Penetration is exceptional, even in subsonic form, as is range. 

     A subsonic version of this round exists; triple all prices for this round.

     Nominal Size: 5.56x21mm

     Actual Size: 5.69x20.86mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 0.58 kg per box of 100; Price: $21 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.005 kg

12-round box: 0.11 kg

18-round box: 0.16 kg

 

 

5.7mm FN

     Notes: This round was developed in the late 1980s by FN for their new P90 Personal Defense Weapon (PDW).  It was later chambered in their Five-seveN pistol.  It was designed to replace the 9mm Parabellum round in certain applications (such as for rear area troops), but no country has as yet adopted either weapon that fires the round in large numbers.  (In fact, most Americans are most likely to see the P-90 PDW on the TV show Stargate SG-1.)  The bullet is very sharply pointed, and the case resembles that of the .221 fireball.  The bullet is very light, but has high velocity, and is known for penetration. 

     A special armor piercing version, the 5.7mm FN High-Velocity, is also available.  Double all costs of ammunition for this round.  A subsonic version of the 5.7mm FN round also exists; triple all prices for this round.

     Other Names: 5.7x28mm, 5.7x28mm FN, 5.7mm P90

     Nominal Size: 5.7x28mm

     Actual Size: 5.59x28.7mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 8.75 kg per case of 1000; Price: $280 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.007 kg

20-round box: 0.23 kg

25-round box: 0.28 kg

50-round box: 0.45 kg

 

5.8mm Chinese Pistol

     Notes: It is a matter of debate whether this round was designed first as a submachinegun or pistol round, but it does seem to have first appeared as a pistol round.  It follows the recent trend towards small-caliber, lightweight rounds designed for use in light pistols and PDWs.  The 5.8x21mm round is, like those sorts of rounds, is short, necked, and uses a lightweight bullet fired at high velocity to achieve results that such a small round would not normally produce.  Like other such rounds, the bullet is sharply-pointed and flies at a very high velocity.

     A steel-cored armor-piercing version is also produced; double all costs of ammunition for this round.  A subsonic version also exists; triple all costs for this round.

     Other Names: DAP92-5.8, QSZ-92-5.8

     Nominal Size: 5.8x21mm

     Actual Size: 5.74x21.26mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 6.05 kg per case of 1000; Price: $220 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.006 kg

20-round box: 0.18 kg

50-round helical: 0.43 kg

 

 

6x35mm KAC PDW

     Notes: Designed specifically for Knight Armaments’ PDW (based on their entry into the US SCAR competition), the KAC PDW round is essentially a blown-out .221 Fireball round with a modified, shorter version of the .243 Winchester round.  Though not necessarily meant for long-range shooting, the KAC PDW round does still have decent range, and in close-quarters battle, is quite hard-hitting and penetrative compared to the 5.56mm NATO round.  The standard KAC PDW round can also be effectively silenced with the proper silencer.

     KAC has plans to produce a true subsonic version of the KAC PDW round; triple all costs for this round.  Other plans include a steel-cored AP round (double all costs), and a frangible version (double all costs).

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This round does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Other Names: 6mm KAC PDW

     Nominal Size: 6x35mm

     Actual Size: 6.17x35.56mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 11.66 kg per case of 1000; Price: $420 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.011 kg

20-round box: 0.35 kg

30-round box: 0.51 kg

 

 

6.35mm Tula

     Notes: The 6.3mm Tula round was an attempt to produce a round for the TK TOZ pistol with more power than the .25 ACP round.  The dimensions are close to the .25 ACP, but the 6.3mm Tula is a much hotter round, with a larger and heavier bullet and a much greater propellant charge.  The 6.3mm Tula round was made only for the TK TOZ pistol, and only tiny lots are made these days.  Handloading is supposedly much more difficult than one might suppose.

     Nominal Size: 6.35x16mm

     Actual Size: 6.39x16.25mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 0.46 kg per box of 100; Price: $17 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.004 kg

8-round box: 0.06 kg

 

 

 

6.5mm CBJ

     Notes: Designed specifically for the SAAB/Bofors CBJ-MS PDW, the 6.5mm CBJ round is a bottle-necked round that is a 9mm-type case necked down to accept a 6.5mm bullet.  Unlike most rounds, the primary loading of the 6.5mm CBJ is an armor piercing round.  This consists of a polymer- saboted 4mm tungsten penetrator with a very high velocity (higher than most assault rifle rounds) and excellent penetration.  The 6.5mm CBJ round also comes in a spoon-nosed jacketed round, again packaged as a saboted 4mm round.  Standard ball (upon which the prices below are based) is also available (which is not saboted). 

     The saboted-tungsten AP rounds as well as the spoon-nosed rounds cost double the prices below.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: 6.5mm CBJ ammunition is quite rare, but available in some places in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Nominal Size: 6.5x25mm

     Actual Size: 6.51x25.2mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 0.92 kg per box of 100; Price: $34 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.008 kg

20-round box: 0.17 kg

30-round box: 0.25 kg

100-round drum: 0.84 kg

 

7mm Nambu

     Notes: This round was designed to be fired from only one weapon, the Japanese Small Nambu (more commonly known as the Baby Nambu) pistol.  It was never an official Japanese service round, nor was the pistol an official sidearm, but it was popular with many high-ranking officers.  After World War 2, the Baby Nambus and their ammunition were taken home by US soldiers and Marines as war trophies, but the pistols are now scares and their rounds even scarcer.  Virtually any 7mm Nambu round found today would be handloaded, but the gunsmith would have to work almost from scratch.  The 7mm Nambu round is not considered an effective self-defense round by Western standards, and might not even be very good against vermin.

     Nominal Size: 7x20mm

     Actual Size: 7.11x19.81mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 0.99 kg per box of 100; Price: $32 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.008 kg

7-round box: 0.1 kg

 

 

 

7.5mm Norwegian Nagant

     Notes: Designed specifically for the m/1883 Nagant revolver that was used by officers until just after World War 2, the 7.5mm Norwegian Nagant was also used by the Swedish m/1887 Nagant copy of the m/1883.  Originally designed for use with blackpowder, the round was later loaded with smokeless powder rounds designed by Norma of Sweden.  The bullet is usually lubricated to a very slight degree.  The case is short and very slightly tapered.  The 7.5mm Norwegian Nagant round is obsolete, and is now in the realm of handloaders, with the exception of small quantities of a cousin of these rounds, the 7.5mm Swiss Army, which is made by Fiocchi, and can be fired from revolvers designed for the 7.5mm Norwegian Nagant.  Cases can also be made by trimming .32-20 cases to the proper length.  Since the round was designed for blackpowder, only a small amount of smokeless powder is safe for use in the 7.5mm Norwegian Nagant.

     Other Names: 7.5mm Nagant Revolver, 7.5mm Swedish Nagant

     Nominal Size: 7.5x23mm

     Actual Size: 8.26x22.61mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.07 kg per box of 100; Price: $39 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.01 kg

 

 

 

 

7.5mm Swiss Army

     Notes: This round was adopted by the Swiss Army for their revolvers as a blackpowder round in 1882.  It was soon converted to a smokeless powder cartridge, and used by the Swiss Army until 1903.  Surplus Swiss revolvers were sold on the US market in the 1960s, and a few other weapons were also chambered for the cartridge, but weapons that fire the 7.5mm Swiss Army round are relatively rare. 

     Other Names: 7.5mm Swiss Army Revolver, 7.5mm Norwegian Revolver

     Nominal Size: 7.5x23mm

     Actual Size: 8.05x22.61mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  1.01 per box of 100; Price: $36 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.009 kg

 

 

 

 

7.62mm M-48

     Notes: Originally designed for use with the VZ-25 submachinegun, the M-48 round was also used for the CZ-52 pistol instead.  The dimensions of the M-48 are identical to the 7.62mm Tokarev, but the propellant charge is greater, making it sort of a hotloaded 7.62mm Tokarev.  The CZ-52 is one of the few pistols that are actually strong enough to handle the M-48 round, but the actual use of this round with the CZ-52 is rare since shooters tend to complain of the recoil and it does prematurely wear the barrel, frame, and slide.

     Other Names: 7.62 Pi

     Nominal Size: 7.62x25mm

     Actual Size: 7.8x26.64mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 16.67 kg per case of 1000; Price: $275 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.015 kg

8-round box: 0.19 kg

32-round box: 0.68 kg

 

 

7.62mm Nagant Revolver

     Notes: This round was designed specifically for use in the Russian 1895 Nagant revolver, and later used in the Pieper revolver.  The round has great velocity, but this has as much to do with the revolver’s design as with the round itself.  The bullet is light and thus stopping power is not what the velocity would seem to indicate.

     Other Names: 7.62mm Russian Nagant Revolver

     Nominal Size: 7.62x38mm

     Actual Size: 7.49x38.86mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.71 kg per box of 100; Price: $55 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.014 kg

 

 

 

 

7.62mm Tokarev

     Notes: This cartridge was introduced along with the Tokarev TT-30 pistol in 1930.  This cartridge is almost identical to the .30 Mauser round and most weapons chambered for 7.62mm Tokarev will chamber and fire the .30 Mauser round without difficulty, and vice versa.  The round has a flat trajectory and, when jacketed, has decent body armor penetration when provided with an adequate-length barrel.  Russian-made ammunition is typically steel-cased and not reloadable under most circumstances.  However, there is some Western manufacture of the 7.62mm Tokarev round, and these are reloadable.

     A subsonic variant of the 7.62mm Tokarev is made for use in silenced pistols.  This ammunition has a reduced propellant charge.  Multiply all prices by three for this ammunition.

     Other Names: 7.62mm Russian Pistol, 7.62mm Russian

     Nominal Size: 7.62x25mm

     Actual Size: 7.8x26.64mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight:  15.88 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $250 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.013 kg

7-round box: 0.16 kg

8-round box: 0.18 kg

9-round box: 0.2 kg

10-round box: 0.22 kg

10-round clip: 0.13 kg

18-round box: 0.38 kg

20-round box: 0.42 kg

30-round box: 0.61 kg

32-round box: 0.65 kg

35-round box: 0.71 kg

36-round box: 0.73 kg

40-round box: 0.8 kg

71-round drum: 1.41 kg

 

 

 

7.62mm Type 64, Type 67 and Type 84

     Notes: The 7.62mm Type 62 round was developed in early 1960s specifically to provide a round that could be used in both the then-new Type 64 pistol and its silenced counterpart.  The Type 64 round is essentially a .32 ACP round with a very few modifications.  The .32 ACP round is semi-rimmed, but the Type 64 round is rimless.  The propellant load was also loaded with only about 75% of the .32 ACP’s propellant load, therefore ensuring that the Type 64 round would fire a subsonic bullet.  Accordingly, the Type 64 round, like many sub-loaded rounds, fires a heavier bullet than the standard .32 ACP bullet.

     The Type 67 is a further sub-loaded version of the Type 64, leading to a somewhat quieter weapon when used in a silenced pistol or submachinegun.  The bullet is slightly heavier, but range is degraded a bit. Noise is still the same class as for the Type 64, but the GM should lean in the direction of the shooter’s quietness in certain circumstances when it is used.

     In the early 1980s, the Chinese developed a version of the Type 64 round designed specifically for use by their version of Air Marshals (along with an updated version of the Type 64 pistol) or for aircrews of large aircraft if their planes get boarded on the ground, called the Type 84 round.  The Type 84 is very similar to the Type 64, but uses a semi-jacketed frangible bullet instead of the standard FMJ lead bullet of the Type 64 round.  This round will not penetrate the skin of the typical airliner at ranges of over 2 meters, and is unlikely to do so at shorter ranges.  It retains the subsonic velocity of the Type 64 and Type 67, and is therefore still useable in silenced weapons. Penetration of body armor is less than that of the Type 64 or Type 67, but this is not measurable in Twilight 2000 v2.2 terms. The Type 84 round costs double the prices listed below.

     Other Names: 7.62x17mm, 7.65x17mm, 7.65mm Chinese

     Nominal Size: 7.62x17mm

     Actual Size: 7.85x17mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 7.26 kg per case of 1000; Price: $380 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.007 kg

7-round box: 0.09 kg

9-round box: 0.1 kg

20-round box: 0.22 kg

30-round box: 0.32 kg

40-round box: 0.42 kg

 

 

 

7.63mm Mannlicher

     Notes: Originally designed for use in the Model 1900 Mannlicher military pistol (made by Steyr in Austria-Hungary and in Spain), the semi-rimmed 7.63mm Mannlicher round was originally designed to be fed by a stripper clip from the top of that pistol and some other later, similar pistols.  This stripper clip is proprietary, and is not removed from the pistol until it is empty or the weapon is to be unloaded, as it helps guide the rounds into the action of the pistols which use it.  The 7.63mm Mannlicher round is barely more powerful than the .32 ACP round, and not as useful, given that most weapons designed for it need that proprietary stripper clip.

     The 7.63mm Mannlicher round and the pistols which fire it were common on the war surplus market until the late 1950s; they are now mostly collector’s items, with ammunition largely the province of handloaders.  The 7.63mm Mannlicher round can actually be made by making some modifications to .30 Mauser rounds; the bullet is essentially the same and the case diameter is virtually identical, though the 7.63mm Mannlicher round is much shorter and carries much less propellant.

     Other Names: 7.65mm Mannlicher

     Nominal Size: 7.63x21mm

     Actual Size: 7.82x21.34mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 0.9 kg per box of 100; Price: $33 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.008 kg

6-round clip: 0.05 kg

8-round clip: 0.07 kg

10-round clip: 0.08 kg

 

7.63mm Mauser

     Notes: Designed by Hugo Borchardt and introduced in 1893, the 7.63mm Mauser round is perhaps better known by the name under which it was introduced, the .30 Mauser.  The 7.63mm was designed for the Borchardt automatic pistol, a predecessor of the Luger, and later adopted as the first chambering for the Mauser c/96 pistol.  The 7.63mm Mauser is known for it’s long-ranged, flat trajectory, but unfortunately also known for a lack of stopping power.  Though still made in small lots by Remington and Winchester until recently, the 7.63mm Mauser is primarily made in Portugal by several firms, and exported worldwide by Century International Arms.  Further development of this round by the Soviets in the late 1920s resulted in the 7.62mm Tokarev round, and most firearms that can fire the 7.63mm Mauser can fire the 7.62mm Tokarev and vice versa.  Performance of the 7.63mm Mauser is in fact virtually identical to the 7.62mm Tokarev round.

     Other Names: .30 Mauser, .30 Borchardt

     Nominal Size: 7.63x25mm

     Actual Size: 7.82x24.54mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 12.98 kg per case of 1000; Price: $240 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.012 kg

7-round box: 0.15 kg

8-round box: 0.17 kg

10-round Clip: 0.12 kg

 

7.65mm Longue

     Notes: This French military pistol cartridge was used from 1935 to 1950, when it was replaced by the 9mm Parabellum.  It is still used to a small extent by the French Police.  A large number of pistols chambering this cartridge have been sold on the surplus market, and thus the demand for the 7.65mm Longue round lives on.  The 7.65mm Longue is slightly more powerful than the .32 ACP round, but it is still a bullet best suited to emergency self defense.  As a submachinegun cartridge, it was basically a failure.

     Other Names: 7.65mm MAS, 7.65mm French, .32 French Long

     Nominal Size: 7.65x19.5mm

     Actual Size: 7.85x19.81mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 9.63 kg per case of 1000; Price: $150 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.008 kg

8-round box: 0.11 kg

20-round box: 0.25 kg

32-round box: 0.39 kg

 

7.65mm Parabellum

     Notes:  This round was designed in 1900 for the then-new Luger pistol.  It is still chambered primarily in old Lugers, though a variety of pistols throughout the years have been chambered for 7.65mm Parabellum, including some relatively new ones.  It is not in current military service, but it is a popular civilian round, particularly in those countries where the use of “military” rounds by civilians is prohibited.  It is a small, lightweight cartridge not known for stopping power or velocity, but it generally doesn’t produce much recoil.

     Other Names: 7.65mm Luger, .30 Luger

     Nominal Size: 7.65x21mm

     Actual Size: 7.82x19.05mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 11.38 kg per case of 1000; Price: $180 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.009 kg

8-round box: 0.13 kg

9-round box: 0.14 kg

12-round box: 0.19 kg

13-round box: 0.2 kg

14-round box: 0.21 kg

15-round box: 0.23 kg

16-round box: 0.24 kg

20-round box: 0.3 kg

32-round box: 0.47 kg

50-round box: 0.72 kg

 

 

8mm Gasser

     Notes:  This round was designed in 1898 as a new round for the Rast & Gasser revolver.  Thereafter, a number of different European revolvers chambered the 8mm Gasser.  It was popular in Europe for a time, but never manufactured in the US, and rarely even sold there.  It is now considered a quite obsolete round and ammunition is very hard to find.  Handloading is often the only way to get 8mm Gasser ammunition these days; the round can be worked up from a .32 Smith & Wesson Long case. However, Fiocchi makes 8mm Gasser rounds in limited quantities.

     Other Names: 8mm Rast & Gasser

     Nominal Size: 8x26mm

     Actual Size: 8.13x26.34mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.36 kg per box of 100; Price: $44 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.011 kg

 

 

 

 

8mm Lebel Revolver

     Notes: This round was designed for the 1892 French Ordinance revolver, and some other manufacturers also made revolvers in this chambering.  Some single-shot rifles were also chambered for the 8mm Lebel Revolver cartridge.  It’s an average handgun in lethality and stopping power, but is considered obsolete these days, and no longer manufactured.  It can be handloaded using .32-20 cases as a starting point, but the .32-20 itself is not a common round.  .32 Smith & Wesson ammunition can be fired out of a revolver that is chambered for 8mm Lebel, but the case will bulge slightly when the charge goes off, and accuracy will be poor.

     Other Names: 8mm Lebel, 8mm Reglementaire Francaise, 8mm French Ordnance

     Nominal Size: 8x27mm

     Actual Size: 8.2x27.18mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.44 kg per box of 100; Price: $46 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.012 kg

 

 

 

 

8mm Nambu

     Notes:  This cartridge was used only by Japanese forces.  It was introduced in 1904 for use in Japanese service pistols, and used until the end of World War 2.  After that war, veterans of the Pacific Theater brought home a lot of Nambu pistols as war trophies (especially US soldiers and Marines), but ammunition for those pistols has been hard to find, since most stocks of that ammunition were destroyed by occupying US troops after World War 2.  Genuine Nambu cartridges are even more collector’s items than the pistols are, and most of those who actually shoot their Nambu pistols do so with handloaded rounds.  In the 1980s, a company in Illinois actually manufactured 8mm Nambu rounds for a short time, but no company has done so in nearly two decades.  The round’s light powder charge and light bullet limits its effectiveness.

     Nominal Size: 8x21mm

     Actual Size: 8.13x21.85mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight:  1.14kg per box of 100; Price $36 per box

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.009 kg

6-round box: 0.1 kg

8-round box: 0.13 kg

30-round box: 0.44 kg

 

8mm Roth-Steyr

     Notes:  This round was designed to be fired from the Roth-Steyr automatic pistol and was never chambered in any other weapon.  It was adopted in 1907, and was a popular war trophy to be brought home by Allied troops after World War 2, but the ammunition is now manufactured only by Fiocchi, in small amounts.  It is a decent combat round, more powerful than the .32 ACP but less so than the .380 ACP.

     Nominal Size: 8x19mm

     Actual Size: 8.36x18.8mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1 kg per box of 100; Price: $32 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.008 kg

10-round clip: 0.08 kg

 

 

 

9x21mm

     Notes: This round was specifically designed for use in countries where the civilian use of “military” cartridges, such as 9mm Parabellum, is illegal.  The 9x21mm round is basically a 9mm Parabellum round with the case lengthened by 2 millimeters, but the round seated more deeply in the case, so the overall dimensions of the round are identical to the 9mm Parabellum.  The same magazines, breech faces, feed ramps, etc., that are used for the 9mm Parabellum can also be used for the 9x21mm round.  Ballistically, they are virtually identical.

     In most of the European Union, the laws in certain countries that generated the 9x21mm round are being changed.  It is likely that in the future, the conditions that created the 9x21mm round will disappear, and possibly, the 9x21mm round with it.

     Other Names: 9mm IMI

     Nominal Size: 9x21mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x21.08mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 13.5 kg per case of 1000; Price: $220 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.011 kg

8-round box: 0.16 kg

10-round box: 0.19 kg

11-round box: 0.2 kg

12-round box: 0.22 kg

13-round box: 0.24 kg

14-round box: 0.25 kg

15-round box: 0.27 kg

16-round box: 0.29 kg

17-round box: 0.3 kg

18-round box: 0.32 kg

21-round box: 0.37 kg

26-round box: 0.45 kg

 

 

 

 

9mm Action Express

     Notes: This round was designed in 1988 by Action Arms Ltd.  It is basically a .41 Action Express round necked down to take a 9mm Parabellum bullet.  It is designed to allow 9mm Parabellum pistols and carbines to take a more powerful bullet with a minimum of modifications, or allow .41 Action Express weapons to be taken down to a smaller caliber.  The 9mm Action Express has been tested in a number of existing weapons and is offered commercially in a few.  It is not being commercially manufactured at present, but is easily handloaded.

     Other Names: 9mm AE

     Nominal Size: 9x22mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x22mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 1.4 kg per box of 100; Price: $44 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.011 kg

10-round box: 0.2 kg

 

 

 

9mm Belgian Nagant

     Notes: Based on a Hungarian modification of a .380 ACP round, the 9mm Belgian Nagant uses a larger, heavier round than the .380 ACP, but not nearly enough propellant to avoid making the 9mm Belgian Nagant round a much weaker round than the .380 ACP (or for that matter, most other 9mm rounds).  The round is also rimmed, as it was designed for a revolver.  The 9mm Belgian Nagant round was for a short time considered for use in the Frommer Stop automatic pistol, but the results were unsatisfactory, and the idea dropped quickly.  The 9mm Belgian Nagant is considered obsolete, but can be made using .357 Magnum or .38 Special brass.

     Other Names: 9mm Nagant, 9mm Frommer

     Nominal Size: 9x22mm

     Actual Size: 9.47x22.3mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.39 kg per box of 100; Price: $50 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.013 kg

 

 

 

 

9mm Browning Long

     Notes: This was once a popular handgun cartridge in Europe, but was never used by US handgun manufacturers.  It was introduced in 1903 as one of the chamberings for the Browning M-1903 pistol, and thereafter used in several other pistols.  In the US, it is sort of a curiosity round, never officially adopted by any manufacturer, but sometimes used in weapons bought from Europe or seized as war trophies.  It is a decent combat round, but easily surpassed by more modern rounds.  It is basically considered obsolete, but can be handloaded, and is still manufactured in some out-of-the-way areas.

     Other Names: 9x20mmSR, 9mm Swedish m/07

     Nominal Size: 9x20mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x20.32mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.3 kg per box of 100; Price: $42 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.01 kg

7-round box: 0.13 kg

8-round box: 0.15 kg

 

 

9mm Dillon

     Notes: Still regarded as a wildcat round, the 9mm Dillon was designed Randy Shelley and Rob Leatham for IPSC competition.  Work on the round was completed in 1988, but it was not until 1991, when Rob Leatham began using it for IPSC competition, that the 9mm Dillon gained some sort of semi-acceptance.  Nonetheless, the 9mm Dillon remains a rare round, with the pistols firing it even rarer. The 9mm Dillon is essentially a 10mm Colt case necked down to accept a 9mm bullet modified from the .38 Super round.  The use of a 10mm case allows the round to produce very high pressures without failing, and the reduced-size round essentially creates a sabot-like effect.

     Other Names: 9x25mm Dillon

     Nominal Size: 9x25mm

     Actual Size: 9.07x25.15mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 1.43 kg per box of 100; Price: $52 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.013 kg

17-round box: 0.37 kg

 

 

 

9mm FAR

     Notes: Like the 10mm FAR below, the 9mm FAR is a proprietary Tanfoglio round that was used by only a few of their pistols, primarily in the Force series.  Like the 10mm FAR, the 9mm FAR is basically a hotloaded version of a .45 ACP round, with the case necked down to take a 9mm Parabellum bullet.  This gives the 9mm FAR excellent stopping power and good penetration, though not equaling the heavier 10mm FAR. The round and the pistols are no longer in production today, and those who have their pistols are generally forced to go to handloaders or handload the rounds themselves.

     Nominal Size: 9x23mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x22.8mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 1.61 kg per box of 100; Price: $58 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.015 kg

16-round box: 0.39 kg

17-round box: 0.41 kg

 

 

9mm Glisenti

     Notes: This round was first developed for the Italian M-10 Glisenti pistol, and was subsequently chambered in a variety of pistols and submachineguns, as it was the official Italian military pistol cartridge in both World War 1 and World War 2.  The size is almost identical to the 9mm Parabellum, but the powder load is not anywhere near as heavy.  9mm Parabellum can often be loaded into a weapon designed for 9mm Glisenti, but this should never be done, because the 9mm Parabellum cartridge is much more powerful and will cause a chamber explosion.  The only manufacturer now making the 9mm Glisenti is Fiocchi, but it may be easily handloaded starting with 9mm Parabellum cases.

     Nominal Size: 9x19mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x19.05mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.21 kg per box of 100; Price: $38 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.01 kg

7-round box: 0.12 kg

8-round box: 0.14 kg

 

 

9mm Largo

     Notes: This cartridge was designed in 1910 for the Danish Bergmann-Bayard pistol.  The Spanish, however, were the largest users of this round, chambering dozens of pistols and even some submachineguns for the cartridge.  This round, however, has never been manufactured in the US, and pistols chambered for the 9mm Largo round in the US and Canada are largely war trophies or military surplus items.  It is basically a longer version of the .38 Automatic round.  Handloaders will find that virtually any 9mm bullet will work in the 9mm Largo case, but results may vary wildly, of course.  The round has a good punch and decent penetration, but tends to produce a lot of muzzle blast and barrel wear.

     Other Names: 9mm Bergmann-Bayard, 9mm Bayard Long, 9mm Bayard, 9mm Astra, 9mm Bergmann #6

     Nominal Size: 9x23mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x23.11mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 14.75 kg per case of 1000; Price: $240 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.012 kg

7-round box: 0.15 kg

8-round box: 0.17 kg

10-round box: 0.21 kg

16-round box: 0.31 kg

20-round box: 0.39 kg

25-round box: 0.48 kg

30-round box: 0.57 kg

32-round box: 0.6 kg

36-round box: 0.67 kg

40-round box: 0.75 kg

 

 

9mm Makarov

     Notes: This cartridge was adopted at the end of World War 2, and has become the standard Russian pistol cartridge.  It is also used in several submachineguns.  It may have been based on an experimental German cartridge, the 9mm Ultra.  It has more power than a .380 ACP, but less than a 9mm Parabellum, and is considered underpowered.

     In recent years an attempt has been made to improve this cartridge, primarily for use in submachineguns.  This led to the 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse round.  This bullet is mildly pointed (as opposed to the rounded 9mm Makarov bullet), and the round is loaded with more propellant.  Triple all prices for this ammunition.

     Other Names: 9mm PM, 9x18mm Russian, 9mm Stechkin, 9mm Type 59

     Nominal Size: 9x18mm

     Actual Size: 9.22x18.03mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  12 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $190 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.01 kg

5-round box: 0.09 kg

6-round box: 0.11 kg

7-round box: 0.12 kg

8-round box: 0.14 kg

10-round box: 0.17 kg

12-round box: 0.2 kg

15-round box: 0.24 kg

18-round box: 0.28 kg

20-round box: 0.31 kg

22-round box: 0.34 kg

25-round box: 0.39 kg

27-round box: 0.42 kg

30-round box: 0.46 kg

32-round box: 0.49 kg

40-round box: 0.61 kg

67-round helical: 1.03 kg

 

 

 

 

9mm Mauser

     Notes: This round was developed as a alternate round for the Mauser pistol, specifically for export to Africa and South America.  The round and the version of the Mauser that chambered it had a short life and were discontinued by Mauser in 1914.  It was revived in 1933 for the Swiss Neuhausen submachinegun, and later for the Austrian Steyr-Solothurn.  Manufacture then resumed in several countries, most notably in Hungary, where it was used until well after World War 2.  However, it is not being manufactured now, and is a collector’s item.  The 9mm Mauser round is very powerful, much more so than the 9mm Parabellum, and approaching the power of the .38 Super round.  Handloaders will discover that they may have to make the cases from scratch or from .357 Magnum rounds, as they are very long cases. 

     Other Names: 9mm Mauser Pistol

     Nominal Size: 9x25mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x24.92mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.58 kg per box of 100; Price: $50 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.013 kg

20-round box: 0.42 kg

40-round box: 0.8 kg

 

 

9mm Parabellum

     Notes: Besides being the most common pistol cartridge in the world, the 9mm Parabellum is also the most common submachinegun cartridge in the world.  It was introduced in 1902 and has been adopted by practically every non-Communist country in the world since then.  Though it was quite popular from its inception worldwide, it was not popular in the US until 1951, when the first domestically-built handguns were chambered for it.  Lately, however, the 9mm Parabellum round has been criticized for its lack of stopping power; many police departments are moving to .40 or 10mm-firing handguns, and the militaries of several countries are moving back to the .45 ACP round for its special operations forces.

     A subsonic version of this cartridge is made for use with silenced weapons.  Triple all ammunition costs for this ammunition.  An armor-piercing version of the 9mm Parabellum round also exists; double all costs for this round.

     Other Names: 9mm Luger, 9x19mm, 9mm Patrone ‘08

     Nominal Size: 9x19mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x19.15mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  12.25 kg per case of 1000; Price $200 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.01 kg

6-round box: 0.11 kg

7-round box: 0.13 kg

8-round box: 0.14 kg

8-round clip: 0.08 kg

9-round box: 0.16 kg

10-round box: 0.17 kg

10-round clip: 0.1 kg

11-round box: 0.19 kg

12-round box: 0.2 kg

13-round box: 0.21 kg

14-round box: 0.23 kg

15-round box: 0.25 kg

16-round box: 0.26 kg

17-round box: 0.28 kg

18-round box: 0.29 kg

19-round box: 0.3 kg

20-round box: 0.32 kg

22-round box: 0.35 kg

24-round box: 0.38 kg

25-round box: 0.4 kg

26-round box: 0.41 kg

28-round box: 0.44 kg

30-round box: 0.47 kg

32-round box, drum, or snail drum: 0.5 kg

33-round box: 0.52 kg

34-round box: 0.53 kg

35-round box: 0.55 kg

36-round box: 0.56 kg

36-round helical: 0.57 kg

40-round box or drum: 0.62 kg

50-round box or drum: 0.77 kg

50-round helical: 0.79 kg

60-round drum: 0.92 kg

64-round helical: 1 kg

71-round drum: 1.08 kg

100-round helical: 1.56 kg

100-round C-Mag: 1.52 kg

108-round drum: 1.64 kg

 

 

9mm SPS

     Notes: Fired by the Russian SPS (formerly P-9 Gurza) pistol, Gepard SMG, and SP-2 SMG, the 9mm SPS round is a long-cased, hotloaded round that has superior penetration, range, and stopping power to most rounds in its class. It is a limited-use round that is not produced in large numbers and is used primarily by military special operations and special police units.  The SPS round is produced only by TSNIITOCHMASH in Russia.  Three versions are available; the SP-11 standard ball round (less common), and it’s armor-piercing counterpart, the SP-10 (considered the standard load). The SP-9 uses a soft lead bullet designed to reduce collateral damage by remaining primarily in the victim with little to no overpenetration; while causing more soft tissue damage. The SP-10 costs double the standard price below. 

     Other Names: 9mm Gurza, 9mm Gyurza, 9x21mm Russian

     Nominal Size: 9x21mm

     Actual Size: 9x20.8mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.45 kg per box of 100; Price: $53 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.013 kg

18-round box: 0.39 kg

20-round box: 0.43 kg

22-round box: 0.47 kg

30-round box: 0.63 kg

40-round box: 0.84 kg

 

 

 

9mm Steyr

     Notes:  Once the standard Austrian military pistol cartridge, the 9mm Steyr round was designed for use in the Steyr M-1912 pistol.  The 9mm Steyr round is very similar in size and appearance to the 9mm Largo round, and can be easily confused.  The 9mm Steyr is now making a slow comeback; however, the best source is still handloading, though Fiocchi still manufactures the 9mm Steyr.  It is a decent man-stopper, and a good combat pistol round.

     Other Names: 9mm Mannlicher

     Nominal Size: 9x23mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x22.96mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.46 kg per box of 100; Price: $46 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.012 kg

7-round box: 0.15 kg

8-round box: 0.17 kg

8-round clip: 0.09 kg

11-round box: 0.22 kg

18-round box: 0.35 kg

32-round box: 0.6 kg

 

 

9mm Ultra

     Notes: This round was first introduced for the Walther PP Super pistol in 1972.  It was designed specifically for the West German Police, and was not available on the open market until 1975.  Since then, many pistols have been chambered for 9mm Ultra, especially after surplus West German Police pistols were sold after they discontinued the use of the round.  The 9mm Ultra round was meant to allow the German Police to continue to carry the light, handy pistols they favored yet have a more powerful cartridge, but this experiment was not successful, as the 9mm Ultra really demands a heavier weapon or acceptance of a lot of recoil and muzzle blast.  (German Police eventually realized they might as well carry 9mm Parabellum weapons.)  The round is slightly more effective than the .380 ACP, and slightly less effective than the 9mm Parabellum.  Several European manufacturers still make the 9mm Ultra.

     Other Names: 9mm Police, 9x18mm Police

     Nominal Size: 9x18mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x18.29mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 8.05 kg per case of 1000; Price: $190 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.009 kg

7-round box: 0.12 kg

8-round box: 0.13 kg

13-round box: 0.2 kg

 

9mm Winchester Magnum

     Notes: The 9mm Winchester Magnum appears to have been introduced in 1977, though a decade later it was still an extremely rare round, and it was not listed in Winchester catalogs until 1988.  It was not chambered in many weapons, most notably handguns like the Wildey, Coonan, and AMT Automag III, and single shot weapons like certain Thompson/Center handguns.  It looks similar to the 9mm Mauser round, but is much bigger, and more powerful than even that round.  Unfortunately, factory rounds are difficult to find today, though handloads can be made from .357 Magnum rounds.

     Nominal Size: 9x29mm

     Actual Size: 9.02x29.46mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.89 kg per box of 100; Price: $60 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.015 kg

7-round box: 0.19 kg

8-round box: 0.22 kg

 

 

10mm Colt

     Notes: This cartridge was developed in 1983 for the Bren-Ten pistol.  The ammunition is literally chock-full of propellant and is almost like a wildcat round.  The 10mm Colt rivals the power of the .41 Magnum, and even approaches the .357 Magnum under some circumstances.  Stopping power and body armor penetration are excellent, but recoil with the round is typically high.  In addition, the long round requires a handgun with a large grip, making things difficult for small hands. 

     Other Names: 10mm Automatic, 10mm Auto, 10mm Colt Automatic, 10mm Bren-Ten

     Nominal Size: 10x25mm

     Actual Size: 10.16x25.15mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  20.38 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $330 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.016 kg

7-round box: 0.21 kg

8-round box: 0.23 kg

9-round box: 0.26 kg

10-round box: 0.28 kg

11-round box: 0.31 kg

12-round box: 0.33 kg

14-round box: 0.38 kg

15-round box: 0.41 kg

17-round box: 0.46 kg

20-round box: 0.53 kg

28-round box: 0.73 kg

30-round box: 0.78 kg

32-round box: 0.83 kg

 

 

 

10mm FAR

     Notes: A proprietary Tanfoglio round, the 10mm FAR was chambered in very few pistols, primarily in their Force line of pistols.  It did not sell well and the pistols and ammunition are rare today.  It’s sort of a .45 ACP round necked down to 10mm, though it is also more hot-loaded than the .45 ACP and has superior stopping power and penetration.  The round and the pistols are no longer in production today, and those who have their pistols are generally forced to go to handloaders or handload the rounds themselves.

     Nominal Size: 10x23mm

     Actual Size: 10.16x22.8mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 2.04 kg per box of 100; Price: $74 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.019 kg

11-round box: 0.35 kg

 

 

10mm Magnum

     Notes: The 10mm Magnum round is essentially a 10mm Colt cartridge with a stretched case, more propellant, and a somewhat heavier bullet (though of the same size as the 10mm Colt’s bullet).  The idea was partially experimentation, but also partially to approximate .41 Magnum performance in a cartridge suitable for automatic pistols.  The 10mm Magnum round is in fact much more powerful than the 10mm Colt, but it was also basically a limited-production niche round – the only production weapon to fire it was a version of AMT’s Automag produced by IAI, the Automag IV.  Most other weapons to fire the 10mm Magnum are specially modified versions of existing pistols and revolvers, done by tinkering gunsmiths.  Ammunition was once made in small lots by Sierra, but production ended over a decade ago, and the 10mm Magnum is very much the realm of handloaders these days.

     Nominal Size: 10x32mm

     Actual Size: 10.16x31.8mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.27 kg per box of 100; Price: $82 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.021 kg

7-round box: 0.26 kg

 

 

 

10.4mm Italian Ordnance

     Notes: Originally developed for the Model 1874 service revolver, the 10.4mm Italian Ordnance was also used in the Bodeo M-1889 (also known as the Glisenti Revolver).  It was found as a blackpowder and a smokeless powder round.  They were common war trophies in World Wars 1 and 2, along with the ammunition for them, but today, the ammunition is available only in small amounts from Fiocchi.

     Other Names: 10.4mm Italian Revolver, 10.35mm Italian Revolver, 10.35mm Glisenti

     Nominal Size: 10.4x23mm

     Actual Size: 10.72x22.61mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  2.04 kg per box of 100; Price: $66 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.016 kg

 

 

 

 

10.6mm German Ordnance

     Notes: Primarily produced for the Models 1879 and 1883 Reichsrevolver (and therefore often called the 10.6 Reichsrevolver), this round was produced in that late 1800s period when it was felt that handguns were best made to fire high-caliber, low-velocity ammunition.  This was because the gunpowders available at the time generally had less power than today’s ammunition, leading to the mistaken belief that it was best to make the ammunition to fire larger calibers.  However, most firearms manufacturers had already begun to realize that such large calibers were unnecessary, and the 10.6mm German Ordnance round was essentially obsolete even as it was being introduced.  The 10.6mm German Ordnance round is believed to be a development of the .44 Russian round.

     Other Names: 10.6mm Reichsrevolver (or Reichs Revolver), 10.6mm Service Ordnance, 10.55mm German

     Nominal Size: 10.6x25mm

     Actual Size: 10.43x24.64mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.85 kg per box of 100; Price: $67 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.017 kg

 

 

 

 

11.35mm Schouboe Auto

     Notes: This round was designed by Danish Army officer Jens Torring Schouboe specifically for use in his Model 1907 pistol.  He wanted to design a more powerful version of his .32 ACP Model 1903 firing the then-new .45 ACP round, but found that the Model 1903 did not scale up well to handle the more powerful round, and therefore designed a custom round for it, working with the designers at the German firm of DWM.  The odd caliber of course doomed the design from the start, and only 50 Model 1907s were built.  Today, the 11.35mm Schouboe Auto round is almost impossible to find; most such rounds today are handloaded only by very skilled handloaders, and there are few Model 1907s left to fire them.  The bullets are very light at 55 grains, since they have a wooden core with a thin steel jacket.  This greatly limits penetration, but the bullet flies far and flat and the pistol is quite accurate.  Furthermore, the round has only 10.4 grains of powder in it, a very light load to match the light bullet and further decrease stress on the mechanism and frame. Later iterations of this round used a thicker aluminum alloy jacket for the bullet instead of steel, making the bullet heavier, but not really increasing performance.

     Other Names: 11.35mm Dansk Schouboe, 11.35mm DRS Schouboe

     Nominal Size: 11.35x18mm

     Actual Size: 11.35x18.14mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 0.4 kg per box of 100; Price: $74 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.004 kg

6-round box: 0.12 kg

 

 

 

12.3mm UDAR

     Notes: The 12.3mm UDAR round is similar in many respects to the 12.5mm DOG round, as both revolvers were designed for the same purpose.  The UDAR round is much longer than the DOG round, but slightly smaller in caliber, and is also a necked-down 32-gauge brass shell round.  Costs below are for a standard ball round.  The low-recoil ball round costs 1.2 times normal, AP costs double, and irritant gas triple.  Other round types are normal cost.

     Twilight 2000 rounds: The UDAR round is very rare in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Nominal Size: 12.3x50mm

     Actual Size: N/A

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 6.35 kg per box of 100; Price: $238 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.059 kg

 

 

 

 

12.5mm DOG

     Notes: Designed specifically for the Russian DOG-1 revolver, the 12.5mm DOG cartridge is a huge round made by converting 32-gauge brass shotshells and necking them down to take the 12.5mm round.  Despite the large side of the cartridges, the weight and size of the various rounds fired give the 12.5mm DOG a relatively short effective range.  The 12.5mm DOG round comes in several different types; the costs below are for a standard ball round.  An armor piercing round in this caliber costs double; an irritant gas round costs triple.  Other rounds are normal cost.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This round does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Nominal Size: 12.5x35mm

     Actual Size: N/A

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 4.73 kg per box of 100; Price: $172 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.043 kg

 

 

 

 

12.5mm Gnom

     Notes: Used only by the OTs-20 Gnom special purpose revolver, this is another round made from a modified 32-gauge brass shotshell.  It is, however, longer and slightly more powerful than the 12.5mm DOG cartridge.  It fires some of the same sort of rounds as the 12.5mm DOG, but with a bit more power (unfortunately, not necessarily measurable in game terms, except for the buckshot round).  Like the DOG, the heavy size and weight of the rounds and loads gives the 12.5mm Gnom cartridge a relatively short range, though the extra propellant in the cartridge and the longer length of the barrel of the revolver that fires it make it more effective.  The costs below are for a standard ball round or buckshot round; AP rounds cost twice as much.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is an extremely rare round in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Nominal Size: 12.5x40mm

     Actual Size: N/A

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 5.4 kg per box of 100; Price: $196 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.049 kg

 

 

 

 

.25 ACP

     Notes: This is one of the primary cartridges of those infamous “Saturday Night Specials” that criminals and punks like so much.  It was introduced in 1908 with the Colt Vest Automatic Pistol, and in Europe with the FN-Browning Baby.  Since then, over a dozen companies have made pistols chambered for this round.  The velocity of the .25 ACP is surprising, however, it also has surprisingly little stopping power, due to the light weight of its bullet.  Though it is good for little more than a backup or self-defense weapon, it is better than nothing at all.

     Other Names: .250 Automatic Colt Projectile, .25 Auto, .25 Automatic, 6.35mm Auto

     Nominal Size: 6.35x15.5mm

     Actual Size: 6.38x15.75mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 5 kg per case of 1000; Price $80 per case (C/S)

Magazines:

Per round: 0.004 kg

5-round box: 0.04 kg

6-round box: 0.05 kg

7-round box: 0.05 kg

8-round box: 0.06 kg

9-round box: 0.06 kg

10-round box: 0.07 kg

 

 

.25 NAA

     Notes: This round was designed in 1999 specifically for the North American Arms (NAA) Guardian series of pocket pistols.  The idea was simple: to put more power into the .25 ACP cartridge.  JB Wood therefore used a .32 ACP case and necked it down to take the .25 ACP’s bullet.  The result provides somewhat more power than a .25 ACP, but subtracts slightly from the range in the short barrels of the NAA Guardian.  (A longer barrel might yield better results.)  The ammunition is made by Cor-Bon, but was not produced commercially until 2002.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This cartridge is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Nominal Size: 6.35x17mm

     Actual Size: 6.38x17.27mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 6.88 kg per case of 1000; Price: $110 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.006 kg

6-round box: 0.06 kg

 

 

 

.32 ACP

     Notes: The .32 ACP round was introduced in 1899 for use in John Browning’s first successful automatic pistol design.  However, the .32 ACP did not really come into its own until Colt license-produced another John Browning design, the M-1903 Pocket Hammerless.  Since then, it has become one of the most popular pistol cartridges ever produced, though interest has steadily waned since the end of World War 2 in favor of larger-caliber rounds.  Nonetheless, virtually every pistol company that now exists or has ever existed has at some time or another produced a pistol chambered for .32 ACP, and some revolvers have also been chambered for the round.  In Europe, the .32 ACP round is still relatively popular; however, in the US, the .32 ACP is usually relegated to backup or self-defense weapons.  .32 ACP is considered pretty much the minimum-power round for any serious self-defense potential.  Several different loadings of the .32 ACP are made, and it is still a very common factory-made cartridge worldwide; it is also easy to handload, as brass and bullets are readily available.

     A subsonic version of the .32 ACP round is made for special applications (generally for use in silenced weapons).  Triple all costs for this version of the .32 ACP.

     Other Names: 7.65mm Browning, 7.65mm Automatic, .32 Auto, .32 Automatic, 7.65mm Auto

     Nominal Size: 7.65x17mm

     Actual Size: 7.85x17.27mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 7.37 kg per case of 1000; Price: $130 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.067 kg

5-round box: 0.07 kg

6-round box: 0.08 kg

7-round box: 0.09 kg

8-round box: 0.1 kg

9-round box: 0.11 kg

10-round box: 0.12 kg

11-round box: 0.13 kg

12-round box: 0.14 kg

13-round box: 0.15 kg

15-round box: 0.17 kg

20-round box: 0.22 kg

33-round box: 0.35 kg

 

 

 

 

.32 H&R Magnum

     Notes:  This round was introduced in 1984 for use in H&R’s Model 504, 532, and 586 revolvers.  It was soon followed by a number of other companies, and became popular.  Though H&R went out of business in the late 1980s (it returned in 2000, but is not producing handguns), Federal produces factory loads for .32 H&R Magnum.  The .32 H&R Magnum is basically longer version of the .32 Smith & Wesson Long.  (Revolvers chambered for the .32 H&R Magnum will also accept .32 Smith & Wesson and .32 Smith & Wesson Long.)  It is a decently-powered round, more powerful than the .38 Special round.

     Other Names: .32 Harrington & Richardson Magnum

     Nominal Size: 7.9x27mm

     Actual Size: 7.92x27.43mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  13.5 kg per case of 1000; Price: $220

Magazines:

Per round: 0.011 kg

4-round box: 0.09 kg

 

 

 

.32 Long Colt

     Notes: This is simply a longer version of the .32 Short Colt round, developed at the same time, and using the same bullet.  The notes are basically the same as the .32 Short Colt, though it is a little more effective.  Chilean and Indian police still use revolvers that fire this round.

     Other Names: .320 Revolver

     Nominal Size: 8x23mm

     Actual Size: 7.95x23.37mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 11.63 per case of 1000; Price: $190 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.009 kg

 

 

 

 

.32 NAA

     Notes: Similar in concept to the .25 NAA round, the .32 NAA is made by necking down a .380 ACP case to accept a .32 ACP bullet.  It was made specifically for the NAA Guardian and has not as yet been chambered in any other weapons.  The ammunition is made by Cor-Bon.  It is a bit more powerful than the .32 ACP round, yet produces less recoil, and approaches the power of the .380 ACP cartridge.

     Nominal Size: 7.65x17mm

     Actual Size: 7.85x17.27mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 10.5 kg per case of 1000; Price: $170 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.008 kg

6-round box: 0.09 kg

 

 

 

.32 Short Colt

     Notes: This round was originally a blackpowder round introduced in 1875.  The .32 Short Colt was actually more popular in Europe in its blackpowder form, where a large number of revolvers were chambered for it.  The round has decent stopping power, but accuracy is not good.  Winchester was still manufacturing this round until recently, though some Cowboy Shooting enthusiasts have demanded its return.  It is easily handloaded starting with a number of similar rounds, like the .32 Smith & Wesson Short or .32 Smith & Wesson Long.

     Other Names: .320 Revolver, .32 Police Positive

     Nominal Size: 8x16mm

     Actual Size: 7.95x16mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 8 kg per case of 1000; Price: $130 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.006 kg

 

 

 

 

.32 Smith & Wesson

     Notes: This is a very old cartridge, originally a blackpowder round, which appeared in 1878.  It is largely a revolver round, and is almost never found in other types of firearms.  It is small, light, cheap, and, you basically get what you pay for, as it is considered minimal for self-defense.

     Other Names: .32 Smith & Wesson Short, DWM202, GR930

     Nominal Size: 7.65x16mm

     Actual Size: 7.92x15.5mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 7.63 kg per case of 1000; Price: $120 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.006 kg

 

 

 

 

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

     Notes: This cartridge was designed as a revolver round in 1903.  It then had a flat-nosed bullet, and was called the .32 Colt New Police.  Later the bullet was given its present ogive profile.  The primary use these days for the .32 Smith & Wesson Long cartridge is in free pistol target shooting.  It is the smallest revolver cartridge that is considered adequate for US police officers.

     Other Names: .32 Colt New Police, .32-44 Target, GR-391, 7.65x32mmR

     Nominal Size: 7.65x24mm

     Actual Size: 7.92x23.62mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  11.63 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $190 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.009 kg

5-round box: 0.09 kg

6-round box: 0.1 kg

10-round box: 0.16 kg

 

.38 Casull

     Notes:  This round was designed to provide a cartridge equal to the .357 Magnum, while fitting in a 1911-type frame.  In this case Dick Casull succeeded: in 1998, he created the .38 Casull round.  It uses what looks like a .45 ACP case necked down to .38 caliber, but is actually a new case that takes advantage of the necked design.  So far, only the CA-3900 fires the .38 Casull.

     Nominal Size: 9x24mm

     Actual Size: 9.09x23.88mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 1.55 kg per box of 100; Price: $50 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.012 kg

8-round box: 0.18 kg

 

 

 

.38 Long Centerfire

     Notes: This round began as a blackpowder rimfire cartridge that was quickly replaced by a centerfire round, and was therefore renamed .38 Long Centerfire.  It was chambered in a number of single shot rifles and a few revolvers, but by 1900, was considered obsolete, even in its smokeless powder form.  It began to be manufactured again in very small lots (at first after the 1993 film Tombstone for the reproduction of the 1873 Colt used in that movie), and is now still made (again, in very small lots) for the Cowboy Shooting crowd, mostly in the form of empty cases.  The .38 Long Centerfire is also easily handloaded.

     Other Names: .38 Long CF

     Nominal Size: 9x26mm

     Actual Size: 9.53x26.16mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.86 kg per box of 100; Price: $60 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.015 kg

 

 

 

 

.38 Long Colt

     Notes:  The official US military handgun cartridge before the advent of the M-1911A1 and the .45 ACP round, the .38 Long Colt was also in common use by police forces in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  This means that quite a few weapons chambered for .38 Long Colt are still around.  Ballistically, the .38 Long Colt is almost the equal of the .38 Special.  Some old .38 Long Colt-firing revolvers will also chamber .38 Special or .357 Magnum cartridges, but this is a sign of extreme wear and these weapons should not be fired, especially with .357 Magnum ammunition.  (This would probably destroy the revolver and injure the firer and anyone nearby.)  Remington is now manufacturing .38 Long Colt ammunition again, as is Black Hills ammunition, in response to the demands of the Cowboy Shooting enthusiasts.

     Nominal Size: 9x26mm

     Actual Size: 9.07x26.16mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  16.88 per case of 1000; Price: $270 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.014 kg

 

 

 

 

.38 Smith & Wesson

     Notes: This old round was first designed for Smith & Wesson’s hinged-frame revolvers in 1877.  The .38 Smith & Wesson has been used all over the world, once being the most prevalent handgun cartridge in the world.  It is well-suited to lightweight pocket revolvers, with relatively little recoil.  At short range, the stopping power is excellent, but range falls off rapidly.  Remington still manufactures .38 Smith & Wesson ammunition.

     Other Names: .38 Webley, .38 Colt New Police, .38 Super Police, .38 Smith & Wesson Short, DM203, GR932, .380/200

     Nominal Size: 9x20mm

     Actual Size: 9.12x19.81mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 13 kg per case of 1000; Price: $210 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.01 kg

 

 

 

 

.38 Special

     Notes: This round was developed for the Smith & Wesson Military & Police revolver of 1902.  It was originally a military-only cartridge, replacing the unsatisfactory .38 Long Colt.  The police soon picked up on it, and it became the most common police revolver round for many decades.  It is considered one of the best handgun cartridges ever made, with a combination of range, low recoil, and with proper barrel length, ability to penetrate body armor.  It should be noted that any revolver that is chambered for the .357 Magnum cartridge can also chamber and fire the .38 Special cartridge (but not vice versa); the bullets and shells are the same size, but shorter.

     Other Names: .38-44 Target, .38-44 High Velocity, .38 Smith & Wesson Special, .38 Colt Special

     Nominal Size: 9x29mm

     Actual Size: 9.07x29.46mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 19 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $300 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.015 kg

10-round box: 0.27 kg

16-round box: 0.4 kg

33-round box: 0.8 kg

 

.38 Super

     Notes: This round was introduced in 1929 to improve upon the .38 Automatic round.  It is almost identical to the older round, but uses a more powerful propellant loading.  It was a curiosity for many decades, but then many manufacturers at once seemed to pick up on the virtues of the round and began chambering pistols for them.  The .38 Super has a flat trajectory at most ranges and performs better than a 9mm Parabellum round at the same ranges.  It penetrates body armor better than a .45 ACP, but has inferior stopping power in most cases.

     Other Names: .38 Super Automatic, .38 Super ACP

     Nominal Size: 9x23mm

     Actual Size: 9.09x22.86mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  14.88 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $240 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.012 kg

7-round box: 0.15 kg

8-round box: 0.17 kg

9-round box: 0.19 kg

10-round box: 0.21 kg

12-round box: 0.24 kg

15-round box: 0.3 kg

16-round box: 0.32 kg

30-round box: 0.57 kg

 

 

 

 

.40 Smith & Wesson

     Notes: This round began as an experiment of a joint venture between Winchester and Smith & Wesson in 1989.  The FBI was working with 10mm Colt-firing pistols and felt that while the stopping power and penetration of the 10mm cartridge was excellent, the round was too big and hot for everyday use, especially by female agents.  They were therefore looking for a smaller round with comparable power.  The power of the .40 Smith & Wesson rivals that of the .45 ACP, but the chamber pressures can be so great that a pistol has to be made especially to withstand it.

     Other Names: .40 Smith & Wesson Auto

     Nominal Size: 10x21mm

     Actual Size: 10.16x21.59mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  17.5 kg per case of 1000; Price $280 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.014 kg

5-round box: 0.14 kg

6-round box: 0.16 kg

7-round box: 0.18 kg

8-round box: 0.2 kg

9-round box: 0.22 kg

10-round box: 0.24 kg

11-round box: 0.27 kg

12-round box: 0.29 kg

13-round box: 0.31 kg

14-round box: 0.33 kg

15-round box: 0.35 kg

16-round box: 0.37 kg

22-round box: 0.5 kg

25-round box: 0.57 kg

30-round box: 0.67 kg

35-round box: 0.78 kg

 

 

 

 

.41 Action Express

     Notes: The .41 Action Express round is a magnum-type round developed to give 9mm handguns much more power without having to do a large amount of modifications to them.  The first factory loads were made in Israel in 1986.  Handloading the .41 Action Express is difficult, since the case cannot be readily formed by modifying any other cases, though with extensive work, a .41 Magnum case can be used.  The performance of the .41 Action Express round is similar to that of the .41 Magnum, though it is more pleasant to shoot and it is primarily a pistol rather than a revolver round.

     Other Names: .41 AE, 10.4mm Action Express, 10.4mm AE

     Nominal Size: 10.4x22mm

     Actual Size: 10.41x22mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  18.75 kg per case of 1000; Price: $300 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.015 kg

6-round box: 0.17 kg

7-round box: 0.19 kg

8-round box: 0.22 kg

9-round box: 0.24 kg

10-round box: 0.26 kg

11-round box: 0.28 kg

12-round box: 0.31 kg

15-round box: 0.38 kg

20-round box: 0.49 kg

28-round box: 0.67 kg

32-round box: 0.77 kg

 

.41 Long Colt

     Notes: Originally a blackpowder round designed for the Colt Lightning revolver, the .41 was for a while at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries chambered in several revolvers, and was soon made into a smokeless propellant round.  However, no production revolvers have been chambered for .41 Long Colt since the early 1930s.  The .41 Long Colt is a lengthened .41 Short Colt round, designed at the same time as that round.  The .41 Long Colt was quite popular during the time it and its revolvers were produced, but it has long been obsolete. Stopping power (with smokeless powder) almost matches the .38 Special round, though it uses a slow, heavy bullet, and does not have the .38 Special’s range or accuracy.  Except for a small batch Winchester made in 1970, the .41 Long Colt has been out of production, and is in the realm of handloaders today.

     Nominal Size: 10.2x29mm

     Actual Size: 10.19x28.7mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.06 kg per box of 100; Price: $75 per box

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.019 kg

 

 

 

 

.41 Magnum

     Notes:  This has been a controversial cartridge since its inception in 1964.  Many wonder what the need is for this round, since we already have the .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum.  Greater stopping power can be put into the .357 Magnum by using heavier bullets, and the .41 Magnum cannot hope to approach the .44 Magnum in power or range.  However, some people want something bigger than the .357, but do not want to have to deal with the blast and recoil of the .44 Magnum.  The .41 Magnum is for them.  However, it was never a very popular round, and few guns chamber it today.

     Other Names: .41 Remington Magnum

     Nominal Size: 10.4x31.8mm

     Actual Size: 10.41x32.51mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  27.63 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $440 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.022 kg

7-round box: 0.28 kg

9-round box: 0.35 kg

 

 

.41 Short Colt

     Notes: This round was developed in 1877 for use in Colt’s new double-action revolver, and it was later used in half a dozen other revolvers.  It is basically a longer version of the .41 Short Colt, and was originally a blackpowder round.  Conversion to smokeless powder came later.  It was popular for many years, though it’s performance is not that different from the .38  Special round, and it eventually became obsolete in favor of that round.  Though Winchester produced a small run in 1970, there has been no large-scale manufacturing of the .41 Long colt in decades, and most such rounds today are handloaded.  Some were produced in the mid-1990s after the movie Tombstone, but this was a very small number.

     Nominal Size: 10.2x29mm

     Actual Size: 10.19x18.7mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.34 kg per box of 100; Price: $49

Magazines:

Per round: 0.019 kg

 

 

 

 

.44 AMP

     Notes: This round was developed in 1971 specifically for the AutoMag 44, later marketed by High Standard, then AMT.  At the time, no one could figure out how to reliably make an automatic pistol function using .44 Magnum ammunition.  This special round was therefore created; it was made by simply cutting off .30-06 or 7.62mm NATO cases until they were 1.3 inches and then trimming.  After the demise of the pistol, ammunition was for a time made in Mexico, then in Sweden.  However, no one now, other than handloaders, is making the .44 AMP (AutoMag Projectile) round.

     Other Names: .44 AutoMag Projectile

     Nominal Size: 10.9x32.9mm

     Actual Size: 10.9x32.97mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  3.08 kg per box of 100; Price $98 per box

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.025 kg

7-round box: 0.32 kg

 

 

 

.44 Colt

     Notes: This was originally a blackpowder cartridge used as a standard service round by the US Army in the early 1870s.  The round was later used with smokeless powder, and loaded commercially until 1940.  The Revolvers that fire this round have become very rare, and original rounds in this caliber even rarer.  Most rounds of this type are handloaded, usually for SASS shooters.  It has pretty decent power for a handgun cartridge.

     Nominal Size: 10.9x28mm

     Actual Size: 11.25x27.94mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.78 kg per box of 100; Price: $88 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.022 kg

 

 

 

 

.44 Magnum

     Notes: This cartridge was a joint development of Smith & Wesson and Remington, designed for a new heavy-frame revolver.  It was meant to beat the .357 Magnum in power, in a case of pure one-upsmanship.  It proved to be enormously popular, and was for a while the most powerful handgun round.  Police like is for its ability to penetrate body armor and vehicles, hunters like it (in rifles) for its range and ability to bring down big game.  However, most police and civilians shy away from .44 Magnum handguns due to their power and recoil.

     A subsonic version of the .44 Magnum cartridge is made.  These rounds are for specialist applications with silenced rifles, and few guns use them.  Triple all ammunition prices for these rounds.

     Other Names: .44 Remington Magnum

     Nominal Size: 11.2x32.8mm

     Actual Size: 10.9x32.77mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  30.63 kg per case of 1000; Price $490 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.025 kg

3-round box: 0.16 kg

8-round box: 0.35 kg

 

 

.44 Smith & Wesson American

     Notes: Introduced in 1869, the .44 S&W American was one of the earliest centerfire revolver cartridges.  It was first designed for blackpowder, but during most of its lifespan it was manufactured in smokeless powder.  Few revolvers were actually designed for the .44 S&W American, but the enormous popularity of the Colt Single Action Army revolver ensured that it stuck around until 1940, and many still handload it today.  The bullet is almost identical to the .44 S&W Russian, but slightly larger and heavier, and the cases can be made by reworking .44 Magnum cases.  Suitable primers are still made.  Most loads are low-powered as the revolvers for which it was designed are largely blackpowder revolvers, and power is similar to the .41 Long Colt.

     Nominal Size: 11x23mm

     Actual Size: 11.02x23.11mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.94 kg per box of 100; Price: $70 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.018 kg

 

 

 

 

.44 Smith & Wesson Russian

     Notes:  This round was designed by Smith & Wesson for the revolvers it sold to the Russian military in 1870.  A civilian version of this revolver was sold starting in 1878.  It was originally a blackpowder round, but made the transition to smokeless powder.  It was a favorite handgun round of Buffalo Bill Cody.  It was a decent handgun round, but made obsolete by the .44 Special round, which is better suited to modern propellants.  A weapon chambered for .44 Special or .44 Magnum will also fire the .44 Smith & Wesson Russian.  It can be easily handloaded starting with .44 Special cases, and Fiocchi and Black Hills sell it.

     Other Names: .44 Short, .44 Russian, DWM242, GR960

     Nominal Size: 11.2x25mm

     Actual Size: 10.9x24.64mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  2.3 kg per box of 100; Price: $74 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.018 kg

 

 

 

 

.44 Special

     Notes: The .44 Special round was originally a blackpowder cartridge, that went smokeless after the introduction of smokeless powder.  The smokeless propellant, with its greater powder, enabled it to achieve greater power than the .44 Smith & Wesson Russian round it replaced.  A variety of American, Spanish, and other European revolvers were chambered for the .44 Special shortly after its introduction in 1907, but interest waned until the past few decades.  It is a very accurate cartridge, but was never developed to its potential until recently.  A revolver that can fire .44 Magnum cartridges can also fire .44 Special cartridges (but not vice versa).

     Other Names: .44 Smith & Wesson Special, GR-964

     Nominal Size: 11.2x29.5mm

     Actual Size: 10.9x29.46mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  27.5 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $440 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.022 kg

 

 

 

 

.44 Webley

     Notes: This round was designed for the Webley RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) revolver in 1868.  As with many rounds of this period, it was originally designed to use blackpowder, but was later converted for use with smokeless powder.  It was, for a time, quite popular for use in pocket revolvers and other self-defense weapons.  It is a short-range round with decent stopping power due to its large, heavy bullet.  The round is long obsolete, the original cartridges collectors’ items, and any new rounds found today probably handloaded.

     Other Names: .442 RIC, .442 Revolver Centerfire, 10.5x17Rmm, .442 Kurz, DWM 221

     Nominal Size: 10.5x17mm

     Actual Size: 11.07x17.53mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.69 kg per box of 100; Price: $54 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.014 kg

 

 

 

 

.45 ACP

     Notes: This round was developed by John Browning himself in 1905 and was adopted as the official US military pistol cartridge in 1911, along with the M-1911 pistol.  Despite having fairly high recoil and being difficult to master, the .45 ACP round is the preferred pistol round of Western special operations forces, due to its knockdown power.  It is, unfortunately, a heavy, slow round with little ability to penetrate body armor, but the even the blunt trauma will produce significant wounds.  Lately, interest has spiked in revolvers firing the .45 ACP round. The .45 is also the preferred pistol round of US Special Operations forces, due to the high stopping power and the fact that it is naturally subsonic and is therefore quieter when used in a silenced weapon.

     A rimmed version of the .45 ACP also exists, called the .45 AutoRim.  Costs and weights are identical to the .45 ACP round for game purposes, although there are no High-Lethality and Extreme High-Lethality versions of the .45 AutoRim.

     The military uses several special versions of the .45 ACP round.  The .45 High-Lethality Round is packed with a bit more propellant and has a pointed bullet for more range, power, and penetration.  The .45 Extreme-Lethality Round is a virtual wildcat round packed with as much propellant at possible, using a lighter steel-cored bullet for even more increased power and penetration.  The .45 High-Lethality Round costs 30 times normal; the .45 Extreme-Lethality Round costs 45 times normal.  They are normally available only in 100-round box form. The High-Lethality round has a one-step increase in penetration and one-point increase in damage; the Extreme Lethality round has a two-step increase in penetration and a two-point increase in damage.  Note that only certain very well-constructed weapons can fire the High-Lethality and Extreme High-Lethality rounds; most of these are military.

     Other Names: .45 Colt Automatic Pistol, .45 Automatic Colt Projectile, .45 Automatic, .45 Auto, .45 Auto Colt, 11.43x23mm Norwegian Colt

     Nominal Size: 11.43x23mm

     Actual Size: 11.48x22.81mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  23.63 kg per case of 1000; Price $380 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.019 kg

5-round box: 0.18 kg

6-round box: 0.21 kg

7-round box: 0.24 kg

8-round box: 0.27 kg

9-round box: 0.3 kg

10-round box: 0.33 kg

12-round box: 0.39 kg

13-round box: 0.42 kg

14-round box: 0.44 kg

15-round box: 0.47 kg

16-round box: 0.5 kg

18-round box: 0.56 kg

20-round box: 0.62 kg

25-round box: 0.76 kg

27-round Taylor Drum: 0.82 kg

30-round box: 0.91 kg

36 round box: 1.08 kg

40-round drum: 1.2 kg

50-round drum: 1.49 kg

60-round drum: 1.78 kg

100-round drum: 2.93 kg

108-round drum: 3.16 kg

 

 

.45 GAP

     Notes: The .45 GAP cartridge was actually not invented by Glock, as many people think, but by Winchester.  It was, however, invented at the request of Glock in 2003, for a then-pending pistol which shortly became the Glock 37.  It essentially allows virtually the same performance as the .45 ACP round, but in a smaller package; this is because while the .45 GAP round is about 3.18mm shorter than the .45 ACP round, it contains the same bullet and about the same propellant charge.  (The .45 ACP case has always had more room for propellant than is actually loaded within the case; if you shake a .45 ACP round near your ear, you can actually hear that there isn’t really much propellant in the case, relative to the length of the case.) 

     AP rounds are available for the .45 GAP cartridge (known as LEO, or Law-Enforcement-Only rounds); these are made only by Winchester, and cost 10 times the normal costs listed below.  Frangible bullets also exist for the .45 GAP; these are normal cost.  Except for the AP rounds, Speer and Hodgdon make .45 GAP rounds.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .45 GAP does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline (nor does any weapon which fires it).

     Other Names: .45 Glock Auto Pistol

     Nominal Size: 11.43x19mm

     Actual Size: 11.48x19.05mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 17.38 kg per case of 1000; Price: $320 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.016 kg

6-round box: 0.18 kg

7-round box: 0.2 kg

8-round box: 0.23 kg

9-round box: 0.25 kg

12-round box: 0.32 kg

15-round box: 0.4 kg

 

 

.45 Hirtenberger

     Notes: The .45 Hirtenberger was developed for only one purpose – to provide a .45 ACP-like round that could be used by Italian civilians.  Italy has very strict laws against civilians using firearms that fire “military” rounds, so from mid-1985 and mid-1987, Hirtenberger Munitions of Austria produced this round.  The .45 Hirtenberger round was produced by shortening a .45 ACP case just enough to satisfy Italian law.  The bullet is essentially the same as a .45 ACP round, but as the case is a little shorter and pressures a little higher, the muzzle velocity is just a little higher (a little over 10 meters per second higher).  Performance is therefore almost identical to that of the .45 ACP round.  The .45 Hirtenberger was not a sales success, was not produced in large lots, and is not being produced now, so it is a rather rare cartridge these days.  It is, however, easily made by handloaders.

     Other Names: .45 HP, .45 Hirtenberger Patronen

     Nominal Size: 11.4x21.7mm

     Actual Size: 11.48x30.99mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.57 kg per box of 100; Price: $103 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.026 kg

13-round box: 0.57 kg

 

 

 

.45 Long Colt

     Notes: This is a very old cartridge, introduced in 1873 for Colt’s Peacemaker single-action revolver.  The cartridge (and the revolver) were adopted by the US Army in 1875, and remained the official military handgun cartridge until 1892.  The .45 Long Colt was originally a blackpowder cartridge that was later converted to smokeless powder.  There is a certain amount of romance associated with the round, given its reputation as the round that “won the West.”  The .45 Long Colt is still a favorite of American revolver aficionados, especially in replicas of Old West revolvers.  The stopping power of the cartridge is greater than that of the .45 ACP.

     Other Names: .45 Colt

     Nominal Size: 11.43x33mm

     Actual Size: 11.53x32.77mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  34.25 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $550 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.027 kg

 

 

 

 

.45 S&W Schofield

     Notes: This is a very old cartridge first developed for the US Army’s Smith & Wesson Schofield revolver.  It was used until 1892, when replaced by a .38 Special-firing revolver.  The round was loaded commercially until about 1940, then discontinued by virtually all manufacturers; in 1997, the cartridge was again loaded commercially by Black Hills Ammunition in response to demand from Cowboy Shooting enthusiasts.  The .45 Smith & Wesson Schofield was designed because the .45 Long Colt did not fit into the new revolver (it was too long).  Revolvers that fire .45 Long Colt can almost always fire .45 Smith & Wesson Schofield, but the reverse is almost never true.  Handloaders who load the .45 Smith & Wesson cartridge should remember that the round was designed for blackpowder, so only a small amount of smokeless powder should be used in the .45 Smith & Wesson Schofield round.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Factory-made rounds are not available.

     Other Names: .45 Smith & Wesson Schofield, .45 Smith & Wesson

     Nominal Size: 11.5x28mm

     Actual Size: 11.53x27.94mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.91 kg per box of 100; Price: $94 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.023 kg

 

 

 

 

.45 Super

     Notes:  Developed in 1988 by the Gun World magazine editor Dean Grennell, the .45 Super is essentially a hot-loaded .45 ACP round using stronger brass.  The .45 ACP’s dimensions were chosen to fit properly in the M-1911’s operating system and to fit the relatively low efficiency of smokeless powder at the time; with modern propellants, the case of the .45 ACP does in fact contain a lot of empty room when it contains a standard-power propellant load.  As .45 ACP brass is relatively thin-walled, Grenell chose to work from the .451 Detonics round, which was also built for a more powerful propellant load but has almost the same dimensions as the .45 ACP round.  Though almost any pistol designed for .45 ACP can chamber the .45 Super, this can be anywhere from unwise to dangerous – at a minimum, you will dramatically shorten the life of the action of the pistol, and at worst, cause a chamber explosion.  At present, only two companies, both in the US, make factory-loaded .45 Super ammunition.

     Other Names: .45 Super Auto

     Nominal Size: 11.43x23mm

     Actual Size: 11.48x22.73mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.07 kg per box of 100; Price: $75 per box

Per round: 0.019 kg

7-round box: 0.24 kg

8-round box: 0.27 kg

13-round box: 0.41 kg

 

.45 Webley

     Notes: The .45 Webley originated as a blackpowder round in about 1874, but did not appear in catalogs until 1876.  It is similar to the .450 Revolver case, but is longer.  A revolver designed for the .450 Revolver round will generally be able to fire .45 Webley ammunition (and vice versa).  Late in the round’s history, it was changed to smokeless powder.  The last known manufactured ammunition was made in 1939 by Winchester.  Any present today is handloaded or a collector’s item.

     Nominal Size: 11.5x21mm

     Actual Size: 11.48x20.83mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.15 kg per box of 100; Price: $68 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.017 kg

 

 

 

 

.45 Winchester Magnum

     Notes: This cartridge was first introduced in 1979.  Winchester didn’t do anything with it, but Wildey chambered for its heavy Magnum semiautomatic pistol, and Thompson/Center put it in one of their Contender single-shot target/hunting pistols.  The .45 Winchester Magnum is basically a long version of the .45 ACP round, with appropriate increases in power and penetration.  It remains, however, a rare chambering.

     Nominal Size: 11.6x30mm

     Actual Size: 11.46x30.43mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  3.14 kg per box of 100; Price:  $100 per box

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.025 kg

6-round box: 0.028 kg

8-round box: 0.36 kg

12-round box: 0.51 kg

 

.50 Action Express

     Notes: This round was developed in 1988 by Action Arms for a new version of the Desert Eagle heavy pistol.  The round was designed to allow IMI to adapt the Desert Eagle to the new cartridge with as little modification of the pistol as possible, so it was based on the .44 Magnum round.  It is a powerful magnum round that has almost too much power for a handgun; handguns chambered for .50 Action Express are necessarily huge.

     Other Names: .50 AE

     Nominal Size: 12.7x34mm

     Actual Size: 12.7x32.64mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  41.38 kg per case of 1000; $660 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.033 kg

5-round box: 0.32 kg

7-round box: 0.42 kg

10-round box: 0.58 kg

14-round box: 0.78 kg

 

 

 

 

.50 GI

     Notes:  This round is an original design of Guncrafter industries, a relatively new firearms company in Huntsville, Arkansas.  It was meant to bring .50-caliber performance to the M-1911-type weapon, and is therefore very close in size and shape to the .45 ACP round – short and fat; in fact, the rim is rebated and the same diameter as that of a .45 ACP round, making conversions of weapons rather easy.  The .50 GI round was designed from the ground up, however, and is not just a sized-up .45 ACP round.  The walls or the cartridge are thinner but made of stronger metal, and it was designed to operate at lower pressures and lower velocities than the .45 ACP round.  It provides striking power slightly greater than the .45 ACP however.  Right now, since the company is just starting up, the round and the pistol which fires it (the Guncrafter Industries Model 1) are relatively rare; time will tell whether this is just another interesting M-1911 variant, or something which is more widely accepted.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This round does not exist.

     Other Names: .50 Guncrafter Industries

     Nominal Size: 12.7x23mm

     Actual Size: 13.08x22.81mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 3.06 kg per box of 100; Price: $96 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.025 kg

7-round box: 0.31 kg

 

 

 

.224 BOZ

     Notes: The .224 BOZ round is a little-known and little-used round; Civil Defence Supply in England, who makes the round and the weapons which fire them, has seen little sales for these products.  Only two weapons are designed to fire the round, a modified Glock 20 pistol (the G-224) and a modified MP-5 submachinegun (the MP5-224).  The .224 BOZ is a 10mm Colt round necked down very heavily to accept a 5.56mm NATO armor-piercing bullet, and is quite hot-loaded.  The round is powerful and produces high chamber pressures in the weapons involved, so much so that they need to be strengthened to handle the wear and tear that firing the .224 BOZ produces (especially in the Glock 20 frames and the MP-5 chambers and barrel extensions).  The round offers high penetration and damage similar to an assault rifle, even when fired from a G-224.  Though it has been tested by military and police forces, no orders beyond rounds for test models for various agencies have been produced as of yet.  It is conceivable that the .224 BOZ could be easily handloaded, though no call for this has arisen; problems with civilians getting AP bullets could also be a problem.  The .224 sort of resembles a short magnum round for a rifle, though it is much shorter than any short magnum round.  CDS absolutely refuses to sell the rounds, its modified weapons for the .224 BOZ round, or any of the tooling or dies for the rounds or weapons, to civilians, and they check police and military concerns very closely.  However, the round is in fact more powerful than the typical pistol or submachinegun round, and has more penetration than most magnum rounds.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .224 BOZ is a very rare round in the Twilight 2000 timeline, as are the weapons which fire it. Most of the few such weapons in use are firing handloaded rounds.

     Nominal Size: 5.56x23mm

     Actual Size: 5.69x23mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 0.64 kg per box of 100; Price: $56 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.006 kg

10-round box: 0.1 kg

12-round box: 0.12 kg

20-round box: 0.19 kg

30-round box: 0.28 kg

 

 

 

 

.224 Harvey Kay-Chuk

     Notes: The .224 Harvey Kay-Chuk is the product of firearms expert Jim Harvey, who developed it in 1956.  It is still considered a wildcat, though it does have broad appeal among a lot of handgun hunters, due to its flat trajectory, low recoil, and surprising power for its size.  Few revolvers have been designed for the .224 Harvey Kay-Chuk, and the round was never produced in anything but a few small lots; it is probable that even the standard 100-round box lots I use as a standard are not available.  The case is based on the .22 Remington Jet, along with one of the lighter versions of the .22 Jet’s bullets.

     Nominal Size: 5.7x33mm

     Actual Size: 5.69x33.51mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 0.94 kg per box of 100; Price: $17 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.009 kg

 

 

 

 

.224V

     Notes: Though currently fired only by the Swiss ASAI MTE-V and MTE-VA pistols, the .224V round was actually developed in the Czech Republic by the Caliber Prague Organization.  The .224V round is essentially a 7.62mm Tokarev round necked down to accept a shortened 5.56mm NATO bullet.  The intent was to provide PDW-type ammunition that combined the flat trajectory of the 7.62mm Tokarev round with the low recoil and higher penetration of a 5.56mm bullet, and also to increase the muzzle velocity due to using a relatively large powder charge to fire a smaller bullet.  Though the rounds and the pistols are still being shopped around, they have yet to see any large sales.  (The market is getting more and more glutted with PDW-type designs, so the future of this round may be in doubt.)

     Other Names: 5.56V

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .224V round is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Nominal Size: 5.56x23.5mm

     Actual Size: 5.69x23.5mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 4.8 kg per box of 100; Price: $19 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.005 kg

16-round box: 0.13 kg

26-round box: 0.2 kg

 

 

.320 Revolver

     Notes:  Though the .32 Short and Long Colts are often called .320 Revolver in Britain, this .320 Revolver round is actually the round that inspired the .32 Short and Long Colt rounds, and is considered the real .320 Revolver cartridge.  It was first used in the Webley revolver in 1870 as a blackpowder round, but was later chambered in several European pocket revolvers.  It is no longer being manufactured by any big companies, though until recently Fiocchi offered it.  It has ballistics and effects similar to the .32 Short Colt – reasonable for self-defense, but not accurate.

     Nominal Size: 8x16mm

     Actual Size: 8.05x15.75mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 0.8 kg per box of 100; Price: $26 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.006 kg

 

 

 

 

.327 Federal

     Notes: The .327 Federal is a new magnum round introduced in 2007 by Ruger for use in a new version of its SP-101 revolver.  The idea was to produce a round which improves on the .32 H&R Magnum, and possibly to provide a round with the power of a .357 Magnum in a smaller package with less kick.  The .327 Federal is an improvement on the .32 H&R Magnum, but does not achieve the goal of providing .357 Magnum power.  Since its introduction, several other revolvers have been designed to fire the .327 Federal round, most notably the Charter Arms Patriot, which is currently chambered only for .327 Federal; some gunsmiths have also chambered the .327 Federal in other revolvers on an experimental basis with good results.  The .327 Federal is the same diameter as the .32 H&R Magnum, but with a stretched case that holds more propellant.  The bullets themselves are the same as in the .32 H&R Magnum.  Recoil is not nearly that of the .357 Magnum if fired from a revolver of the same size and weight, but is more than that of the .32 H&R Magnum.  Performance is, in fact, similar to that of the .32-20 Winchester rifle round in a revolver.  Though it has not been done yet, it is believed that it is only a matter of time before lever-action rifles and carbines are offered chambered for .327 Federal.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .327 Federal does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  .327 Federal ammunition is currently made by Federal Cartridges, Ruger, and Fiocchi.

     Other Names: .327 Federal Magnum

     Nominal Size: 8x30mm

     Actual Size: 7.92x30.43mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 15 kg per case of 1000; Price: $240 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.012 kg

 

 

 

 

.356 TSW

     Notes:  The .356 TSW round  was introduced in 1995, and was designed by Lew Horton and Team Smith & Wesson specifically for IPSC competition.  It was designed to provide a cartridge with ballistics superior to the .357 SiG and .357 Magnum rounds (but not necessarily more power).  It is essentially a hotloaded 9mm-class round – many say unnecessarily so.  The only production handgun to use the .356 TSW cartridge was Smith & Wesson Super 9 version of the Model 900 series.  The round failed in the sales department quickly; reasons cited were its hot loading and that the round was not marketed to shooters that might have liked it the best – hunters.

     Other Names: .356 Team Smith & Wesson

     Nominal Size: 9x21.5mm

     Actual Size: 9.04x21.48mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.21 kg per box of 100; Price: $44 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.011 kg

15-round box: 0.28 kg

 

 

 

.357 AMP

     Notes: This is a .44 AMP case necked down to .357 caliber.  It was not as popular as the .44 AMP round-firing Automag, and it did not appear until 1973.  The rounds were manufactured in the US for a while, then in Mexico and Sweden, but are now made only by handloaders or special orders.  Like the .44 AMP, the .357 AMP is quite a bit more powerful than its .357 Magnum counterpart.  As a pistol hunting round, the .357 AMP is pretty good, but it’s a bit overpowered for self-defense (though it will bring a man down pretty easily).

     Other Names: .357 Auto Magnum Projectile, .357 AutoMag, .357 Auto Magnum

     Nominal Size: 9x33mm

     Actual Size: 9.07x32.97mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 2.11 kg per box of 100; Price: $68 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.017 kg

7-round box: 0.22 kg

 

 

 

.357 Magnum

     Notes: This lengthened, hot-loaded .38 Special cartridge was introduced in 1935 by Smith & Wesson for its heavy-frame revolvers.  It was the most powerful handgun cartridge in the world until the advent of the .44 Magnum in 1955.  Virtually every revolver maker has chambered a revolver for the .357 Magnum round, and some semiautomatic pistols are also made to fire it.  It rivals the .38 Special for ubiquity in police revolvers.  It can also be used in rifles, where it has brought down game as big as grizzly bears.  Some countries’ special operations forces still use revolvers chambered for the .357 Magnum round, considering them to be superior to pistols.

     Other Names: .357 Smith & Wesson Magnum

     Nominal Size: 9x33mm

     Actual Size: 9.07x32.77mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  21.13 kg per case of 1000; Price $340 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.017 kg

5-round box: 0.16 kg

7-round box: 0.22 kg

9-round box: 0.27 kg

 

.357 Maximum

     Notes: This round is the result of a collaboration between Remington and Ruger in 1983.  The first weapon to chamber the round was a modified Ruger Blackhawk revolver, followed by a Dan Wesson design and the Thompson/Center Contender single-shot target/hunting pistol.  The .357 Maximum is basically a longer version of the .357 Magnum cartridge, with appropriate increases in propellant and power.   The first weapons to fire the round were modified from .357 Magnum-firing weapons, but it was found that even these tough weapons could not handle the new round and wore out quickly.  A weapon therefore has to be designed specifically to fire the .357 Maximum.  It has been said that the best application of the .357 Maximum would be in a rifle, but none have as of yet been designed to fire it. 

     Other Names: .357 Remington Maximum, .357 SuperMag

     Nominal Size: 9x40mm

     Actual Size: 9.07x40.39mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  2.61 kg per box of 100; Price:  $42 per box

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.021 kg

 

 

 

 

.357 SiG

     Notes: This is a .40 Smith & Wesson case necked down to accept a 9mm bullet.  The idea was to achieve .357 Magnum ballistics (but not necessarily power) from semiautomatic pistols.  It is a compact round that offers good performance in a small package.  These rounds tend to be loaded with a large amount of propellant, and this gives them their high velocity.  The .357 SiG round is slowly becoming more popular in the world, and some police departments have adopted it.

     Nominal Size: 9x22mm

     Actual Size: 9.07x21.97mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 14.25 kg per case of 1000; Price $230 per case (S/R)

Magazines:

Per round: 0.011 kg

7-round box: 0.15 kg

9-round box: 0.18 kg

10-round box: 0.2 kg

12-round box: 0.23 kg

13-round box: 0.25 kg

14-round box: 0.27 kg

15-round box: 0.29 kg

 

.380 ACP

     Notes: This round was introduced in the Colt Pocket Automatic series in 1908.  Several governments have adopted it as their official military pistol cartridge, and many others have adopted it as a secondary standard.  Virtually all pistol manufacturers have, at one time or another, chambered a pistol to fire the .380 ACP round.  It has more stopping power and range than the .32 ACP, but is in essence an overgrown version of the .32 ACP.  It is considered the minimum pistol cartridge for offensive work.

     Other Names: 9mm Short, 9mm Kurz, 9x17mm, 9mm Browning Short, .380 Automatic Colt Projectile, .380 Auto, .380 Automatic

     Nominal Size: 9x17mm

     Actual Size: 9.04x17.27mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  11.13 kg per case of 1000; Price:  $180 per case

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.009 kg

5-round box: 0.09 kg

6-round box: 0.1 kg

7-round box: 0.11 kg

8-round box: 0.13 kg

9-round box: 0.14 kg

10-round box: 0.16 kg

11-round box: 0.17 kg

12-round box: 0.18 kg

13-round box: 0.2 kg

14-round box: 0.21 kg

15-round box: 0.22 kg

16-round box: 0.24 kg

17-round box: 0.25 kg

18-round box: 0.26 kg

19-round box: 0.28 kg

20-round box: 0.29 kg

22-round box: 0.32 kg

30-round box: 0.43 kg

32-round box: 0.45 kg

36-round box: 0.51 kg

40-round box: 0.56 kg

60-round drum: 0.84 kg

108-round drum: 1.49 kg

 

.380 British Service

     Notes: The .380 British Service round is a slightly modified version of the .38 Smith & Wesson round, developed in 1922 primarily to take advantage of smokeless powder and to fit the unique dimensions of British service revolvers of the time.  Another major difference was that the .380 British Service used a heavier bullet of a softer lead alloy; later this was issued with a lighter jacketed bullet and called the .380 Revolver IIz round. Measurements are only minimally different from the .38 Smith & Wesson round, but enough that the two are not interchangeable.

     Other Names: .38/200, .380/200 Revolver Mk I, .38 British, .380 British Revolver, .380 Revolver Ml IIz,

     Nominal Size: 9x20mm

     Actual Size: 9.09x19.38mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  1.11 kg per box of 100; Price: $40 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.01 kg

 

 

 

 

.380 Revolver

     Notes: This round was designed for the Webley revolver after it was discovered that most people simply couldn’t handle the recoil and power of the .455 Webley Mk I, and that such a powerful cartridge was not necessarily needed in a handgun cartridge (or so it was thought at the time).  It was designed in 1868 as a blackpowder round, then changed to smokeless powder.  The .38 Short Colt is largely a copy of the .380 Revolver round, and most revolvers designed for the .380 Revolver round will also chamber and fire the .38 Short Colt without a problem.  Currently, the only company loading the .380 Revolver round is Fiocchi.

     Other Names: .380 Webley Revolver

     Nominal Size: 9x18mm

     Actual Size: 9.53x17.78mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.26 kg per box of 100; Price: $40 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.01 kg

 

 

 

 

.400 Cor-Bon

     Notes: This is a .45 ACP cartridge necked down to 40 caliber.  It was designed partially to boost .40-caliber performance; however, the main reason it was designed is that most existing .40 and .45 Caliber pistols can be modified to fire .400 Cor-Bon simply by changing the barrel and feed ramp.  The .400 Cor-Bon produces a round of higher power than .40 caliber rounds, with less recoil than the .45 ACP.  It is an excellent self-defense round, approaching the 10mm Colt in stopping power.

     Nominal Size: 10x23mm

     Actual Size: 10.1x22.8mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 18.25 per case of 1000; Price: $290 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.015 kg

7-round box: 0.19 kg

10-round box: 0.26 kg

 

 

.440 Cor-Bon

     Notes: This relatively-new cartridge was designed in 1997 by necking down a .50 Action Express cartridge to .429 caliber.  It is designed more for pistol hunting than anything else, but lends itself to self-defense in heavier weapons such as the Tromix Jackhammer due to the lower recoil than the .50 Action Express and superior stopping power than other pistol cartridges normally used in submachineguns.  The ballistics are comparable to those of the .454 Casull.

     Nominal Size: 10.9x33mm

     Actual Size: 10.9x32.51mm

     Case Type: Necked

     Weight: 30.38 kg per case of 1000; Price: $490 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.024 kg

7-round box: 0.31 kg

10-round box: 0.42 kg

15-round box: 0.61 kg

 

.445 SuperMag

     Notes: Designed by Elgin Gates and later popularized in Dan Wesson’s revolver designs, the .445 SuperMag is still considered a semi-wildcat round today.  Dan Wesson is the only one who has designed a production revolver firing the .445 SuperMag, though some tinkerers have modified weapons to fire the round.  The .445 SuperMag is essentially a stretched .44 Magnum round, using the same bullets.  Starline is the only company that ever produced lots of cases, and that was some time ago.  Every so often, a company will produce small lots of .445 SuperMag, with the latest being the Dan Wesson company (under the CZ-USA umbrella), but it is by no means a cartridge in large-scale production.  The .445 SuperMag produces a large amount of muzzle blast and recoil, and revolvers designed for it are generally large and heavy.

     Nominal Size: 11x41mm

     Actual Size: 10.97x40.64mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 3.38 kg per box of 100; Price: $123 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.031 kg

 

 

 

 

.450 Revolver

     Notes: This was the British Army’s first centerfire revolver cartridge, adopted in 1868.  It was originally a blackpowder cartridge, but was later adapted for smokeless powder.  It was never a satisfactory military round, but had a surprisingly long period of use, still being used in reserve weapons until World War 1.  The .450 Revolver round can be fired from revolver designed for .455 Webley ammunition without a problem (but not vice versa).  It has long been considered obsolete, but Fiocchi still makes lots of this ammunition from time to time.

     Other Names: .450 Adams, .450 Webley Revolver, .450 Short, .450 Colt, .450 Mk III

     Nominal Size: 11.5x17mm

     Actual Size: 11.56x17.53mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 1.84 kg per box of 100; Price: $58 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.015 kg

 

 

 

 

.451 Detonics Magnum

     Notes: Introduced in 1983, the .451 Detonics Magnum round was designed to allow a 1911-type pistol to take a more powerful round with performance similar to the .45 Winchester Magnum; the .45 Winchester Magnum itself is too long to fit into a 1911-type pistol without redesigning the weapon to the point that you essentially have a new pistol.  Pistols firing the .451 Detonics Magnum (primarily certain limited-production Detonics pistols of the 1980s and early 1990s), however, do require some modification (primarily to chamber length and some strengthening), and pistols that can chamber the .45 ACP cannot chamber the .451 Detonics Magnum (though pistols chambered for the .451 can chamber the .45 ACP round).  The .451 Detonics Magnum round also uses a case with thicker walls and a greater propellant charge.  Bullets for the .451 Detonics Magnum are also lighter than the typical 230-grain .45 ACP bullet.  The .451 Detonics Magnum is no longer being manufactured (and never were in large quantities), except by handloaders.

     Other Names: .451 Detonics, .451 Det/Mag

     Nominal Size: 11.43x24mm

     Actual Size: 11.48x24.08mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.19 kg per box of 100; Price: $80 per box

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.02 kg

6-round box: 0.22 kg

7-round box: 0.26 kg

8-round box: 0.29 kg

 

.454 Casull

     Notes: This round was developed in 1957 for Dick Casull’s 454 Casull revolver.  The round is essentially a stretched .45 Long Colt round.  This round has not been chambered in many revolvers and is still a rather rare round.  It is easily more powerful than the .45 Long Colt round, and is even more powerful than the .44 Magnum.  The bullets are unusually hard and have good penetrative power.  A revolver that is chambered for the .454 Casull round can also fire .45 Long Colt ammunition; however, the cylinders must be carefully cleaned before firing .454 Casull again, or the revolver can be damaged beyond repair due to fouling.

     Nominal Size: 11.5x35mm

     Actual Size: 11.48x35.31mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight:  3.65 kg per box of 100; Price:  $116 per box

Magazines: 

Per round: 0.029 kg

 

 

 

 

.455 Webley Automatic

     Notes: This is a semi-rimmed round adapted from the Webley revolver rounds, and first used in the 1912 Webley self-loading pistol.  It is a low velocity round (even lower than that of the .45 ACP), and has a very blunt nose that cause it to lose speed quickly.  It was retired from British service (along with the pistol that fired it) at the end of World War 1.  Though many of the pistols were sold on the surplus market all over the world, very little of the ammunition exists today, and most of it is handloaded.

     Other Names: .455 Webley Auto

     Nominal Size: 11.5x24mm

     Actual Size: 11.56x23.62mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.48 kg per box of 100; Price: $80 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.02 kg

7-round box: 0.25 kg

 

 

 

.455 Webley Revolver Mk I

     Notes: This round was designed by the British in 1892 to replace several older revolver rounds.  It was at first designed to be a blackpowder round, but in 1894 was re-designed to use smokeless powder.  The last company to commercially load this round was Colt in 1930, until Fiocchi began offering the round again in recent years.  As a revolver round, it has basically adequate stopping power despite its low velocity.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Factory-made rounds are not available.

     Other Names: .455 Enfield, .455 British Service, .455 Colt, .455 Revolver Mk I

     Nominal Size: 11.5x22mm

     Actual Size: 11.56x22.1mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.33 kg per box of 100; Price: $74 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.019 kg

 

 

 

 

.455 Webley Revolver Mk II

     Notes: This is an updated version of the .455 Webley Revolver Mk I (a round originally designed for blackpowder).  It was used until World War 2, then the revolvers that fired them were sold on the open market at cut-rate prices.  The .455 Webley Revolver Mk II is a very low-velocity round that does not have much striking power despite its large size.  Fiocchi still makes the cartridge, but it is essentially obsolete except to collectors.

     Other Names: .455 Revolver Mk II

     Nominal Size: 11.5x19mm

     Actual Size: 11.53x19.56mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.04 kg per box of 100; Price: $66 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.016 kg

 

 

 

 

.460 Rowland

     Notes: The .460 Rowland was designed specifically to out-perform the .45 Super round yet be usable in 1911-type pistols with only a small conversion kit, and to have the power of a .44 Magnum round in a cartridge designed for a semiautomatic pistol.  (Clark Custom Guns does caution that not all 1911-type pistols are suitable for conversion to .460 Rowland.)  Designed by John Rowland in 1996, Rowland contracted with Clark Guns to develop the conversion kit utilizing the .460 Rowland round.  Some gunsmiths have also independently developed conversions to allow the .460 Rowland to be fired from the Ruger Blackhawk and Smith & Wesson 25 and 625 revolvers, and a Mech-Tech kit exists to convert a .460 Rowland-firing 1911 into a carbine.  Complete cartridges, bullets, and brass are primarily made by Georgia Arms and sold through Clark Custom Guns; .460 Rowland brass is also available from Starline; bullets are also available from Remington, Sierra, Speer, and Hornady.  Though case length is longer, the complete cartridge is the same length as that of the .45 ACP.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .460 Rowland is an extremely rare custom round in the Twilight 2000 timeline, fired from a few custom-built pistols.

     Nominal Size: 11.68x25mm

     Actual Size: 11.46x24.38mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.21 kg per box of 100; Price: $80 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.02 kg

7-round box: 0.26 kg

8-round box: 0.29 kg

 

 

.460 Smith & Wesson Magnum

     Notes: The .460 Smith & Wesson Magnum is essentially a longer, blown-out version of the .454 Casull round; physically, it dwarfs that round.  It was designed primarily for use in handgun hunting, and can take down even large game such as an elk or bear. Revolvers that can fire the .460 S&W Magnum can usually also fire the .454 Casull round and the .45 Long Colt round, but the reverse is not usually true – the pressures produced by the .460 round are much too high for anything but a specially-designed weapon to handle.  The .460 Smith & Wesson Magnum is even close to the .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum for stopping power, range, and penetration, and revolvers designed for the .500 S&W Magnum round can often be easily converted to fire .460 S&W Magnum.  The .460 S&W Magnum is so powerful that Smith & Wesson absolutely insists that a revolver chambered for it be fired with the shooter using ear protection – the sound is so loud that it can damage hearing within firing a few rounds.  Today, most major ammunition makers produce versions of the .460 Smith & Wesson Magnum.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .460 Smith & Wesson Magnum does not appear in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Other Names: .460 Smith & Wesson, .460 S&W Magnum, .460 S&W

     Nominal Size: 11.5x45mm

     Actual Size: 11.53x45.47mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 47.5 kg per case of 1000; Price: $760 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.035 kg

 

 

 

 

.475 Linebaugh

     Notes: This round was produced by John Linebaugh in 1988 in the never-ending quest to develop the world’s most powerful handgun cartridge. (It was, for a short time.)  The .475 Linebaugh is based on a cut-down .45-70 Government cartridge, with a heavy bullet and chock-full of propellant.  Its best use is hunting, self-defense against large animals, target shooting, and for bragging rights.  Only the company of Buffalo Bore produces factory lots, but not in large quantities.

     Nominal Size: 12x38mm

     Actual Size: 12.07x38.1mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 4.36 kg per box of 100; Price: $140 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.038 kg

 

 

 

 

.475 Wildey Magnum

     Notes: This round was the second cartridge designed to be chambered in the huge Wildey Magnum pistol, after the .45 Winchester Magnum.  It is based on the .284 Winchester rifle cartridge, shortened greatly and necked out to handle the large-caliber bullet involved.  The .475 Wildey Magnum is best used as a hunting and target-shooting cartridge; the heavy recoil and questionable accuracy unless carefully aimed mean that it is not truly useful as a defensive or offensive weapon, though the round could probably bring down Andre the Giant.  Manufactured lots are available in the US, in small numbers.

     Other Names: .475 Wildey

     Nominal Size: 12x33mm

     Actual Size: 12.07x32.89mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 3.76 kg per box of 100; Price: $120 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.03 kg

8-round box: 0.43 kg

 

 

 

.476 Enfield

     Notes: This British military revolver round had a relatively short military history, from 1881 to 1891, when it was replaced by the first of the .455 Webley rounds.  The Mk III version is the version of the .476 Revolver round that used smokeless powder; earlier marks used blackpowder.  It too was an unsatisfactory round and quickly became obsolete, and the province of handloaders.

     Other Names: .476 Enfield Mk III, .476 Eley, .455/476, .476 Revolver

     Nominal Size: 12x22mm

     Actual Size: 11.99x22.1mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 2.5 kg per box of 100; Price: $80 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.02 kg

 

 

 

 

.480 Ruger

     Notes:  This round was originally designed to be chambered in a special 50th-anniversary Ruger Super Redhawk to bear Bill Ruger’s name.  The round itself was an experiment and not intended to break any power records – it basically falls between the .44 Magnum and .454 Casull in terms of power.  It was more intended to offer a power increase over the .44 Magnum, but without the recoil increase of the .454 Casull.  The case is a cut-down and modified .45-70 round.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This round does not exist.

     Nominal Size: 12x32mm

     Actual Size: 12.07x32.64mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 37.38 kg per case of 1000; Price: $600 per case

Magazine:

Per round: 0.03 kg

 

 

 

 

.500 Linebaugh

     Notes: This was another result of John Linebaugh’s search for the most powerful handgun cartridge possible.  It is based on the .348 Winchester case, cut down and necked up to .50 caliber.  It was originally designed to be fired from a modified Ruger Bisley revolver, but has since been chambered in other revolvers.  The .500 Linebaugh is so powerful that it can even take down African game with the proper revolver (and if you can get close enough).  It will kill most North American animals straight away.  Handloading this round can be a problem due to the dearth of .348 Winchester cartridges. 

     Nominal Size: 13x36mm

     Actual Size: 12.95x35.81mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 4.72 kg per box of 100; Price: $150 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.038 kg

 

 

 

 

.500 Maximum

     Notes: John Taffin says that with the .500 Maximum, cartridge manufacturers have indeed come up with the biggest and most powerful (and legal) cartridge available for a handgun.  The .500 Maxiumum, as one of its alternate names would indicate, a stretched and strengthened version of the .500 Linebaugh (already a powerful cartridge).  The power and recoil is, to say the least, heavy, and assuming you can get close enough, the round could easily take down even huge game like an Elephant (or obliterate a human head…).  The .500 Maxium is largely handloaded, though manufactured cartridges are available in small lots.  Cases are generally re-formed .348 Winchester rifle rounds, though Ben Forkin also makes fully formed brass suitable for the .500 Maximum, and the heavier bullets useable in the .500 Linebaugh will work in the .500 Maximum.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .500 Maximum is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Other Names: .500 Linebaugh Long

     Nominal Size: 13x41mm

     Actual Size: 12.95x40.89mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 4.74 kg per box of 100; Price: $$172 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.043 kg

 

 

 

 

.500 Smith & Wesson Magnum

     Notes: Developed by Cor-Bon for Smith & Wesson, the .500 Smith & Wesson was introduced along with its Model 500 X-Frame revolver in 2003.  The round is perhaps the most powerful handgun round in the world today, though newer loads such as the .500 Wyoming Express have also been given that title.  The .500 Smith & Wesson makes a .44 Magnum round look like a pipsqueak by comparison; it’s a massive round over 2 inches long with a round over a half an inch in diameter, and very thick cartridge walls.  Handguns designed for the .500 Smith & Wesson are usually equipped with rather large muzzle brakes to help tame the massive recoil, and are usually built on massive frames (Smith & Wesson used it’s X-Frame, which is otherwise used only by the Smith & Wesson 460XVR).  More recently, some manufacturers have been making carbines and rifles chambered for .500 Smith & Wesson.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum round does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Other Names: .500 Smith & Wesson, .500 Magnum

     Nominal Size: 13x41mm

     Actual Size: 12.7x41.28mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 45.98 kg per case of 1000; Price: $840 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.042 kg

 

 

 

 

.500 Smith & Wesson Special

     Notes: Shooters really liked the new .500 handguns chambering the .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum cartridge, and they wanted to keep the power of that round – but for many shooters, even experienced ones, repeated shooting of the .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum, to attain and keep proficiency with the revolver, was a bit overwhelming, and the real-life cost of the .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum round is also an issue.  Smith & Wesson kept getting requests for a less powerful version of the .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum, and some handloaders were actually making them.  In 2004, Smith & Wesson asked Cor-Bon to design such a round, which they called (in the usual pattern) the .500 Smith & Wesson Special.  It is essentially the same bullet(s) as found in a .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum, but put into a shorter case and using less propellant.  Unlike the .38 Special and .44 Special, though, the .500 Special came after the .500 Magnum instead the .500 Magnum being developed from it.  The result is a .500 round which has power similar to the .357 Magnum – much easier on the shooter.  Smith & Wesson and some other manufacturers have hinted that they may develop some revolver designed only for the .500 Special round (and not the capable of firing the .500 Magnum), but none have confirmed this as of yet.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: the .500 Smith & Wesson Special round does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Other Names: .500 Special

     Nominal Size: 13x37mm

     Actual Size: 12.7x37.11mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 47 kg per case of 1000; Price: $750 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.038 kg

 

 

 

 

.500 Wyoming Express

     Notes: Not to be outdone in the power department by the .500 Smith & Wesson Magnum, the .500 Wyoming Express was designed by the armorers at Freedom Arms specifically for its Model 83 revolver.  The cartridge features thick walls and is belted to make sure headspacing is correct in the Model 83 revolver.  The .500 Wyoming Express was designed on a computer in order to get the optimum combination of powder capacity, case volume, bullet weight, and pressure capability – and then it was tweaked further through testing.  Freedom Arms does not recommend hotloading or reduced loadings, as these can damage the revolver firing the round.  It also does not recommend loading the .500 Wyoming Express with excessively light or heavy bullets, as the same can result.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .500 Wyoming Express does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Other Names: .500 WE

     Nominal Size:  12.7x35mm

     Actual Size: 12.7x34.8mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 3.88 kg per box of 100; Price: $141 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.035 kg

 

 

 

 

.510 GNR

     Notes: The .510 GNR round was designed in 2007 as a participant in the never-ending competition for the biggest, baddest handgun and cartridge.  Though it is not a physically huge round, it has great power due to the heavy bullet it uses and the sheer amount of propellant it is loaded with, as well as its huge caliber.  It was designed by Gary Reeder, the famed firearms expert and designer (GNR = Gary N. Reeder). The caliber is so big, for example, that it is illegal in California and some other jurisdictions in both the US and some other countries that otherwise allow for powerful rounds. (A bit of an overreaction in my book – I don’t think the average person needs to own a cannon, but even an above-average crook isn’t going to be using something like a Reeder 510 Hunter either.)  As with most such rounds, its best use is in handgun hunting, and the .510 GNR is quite adept at that – even a short-barreled Reeder 510 Hunter can bring down medium game, and a longer-barreled one can take down large game like charging bears.  So far, the only weapon chambered for the .510 GNR is the Reeder 510 Hunter, and only Reeder makes the ammunition.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .510 GNR is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Nominal Size: 13x33mm

     Actual Size: 12.98x33.27mm

     Case Type: Straight

     Weight: 3.87 kg per box of 100; Price: $141 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.035 kg