The magazines presented here are based on light alloy magazines.  For steel magazines, increase weight by 2%; for plastic or synthetic magazines; decrease weight by 8 percent.

 

.17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire

     Notes: This is a powerful rimfire round, quite adequate for the hunting of small game at up to medium range.  It approaches the power of the larger .22 Hornet round, and the velocity is exceptional, as is the penetration for a round of its small size.  The .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire also shoots very flat, and this improves the accuracy of the round.  The round has a polymer tip (usually red in color) that causes the round to expand greatly in soft tissue.  (Hornady calls this a “V-Max” bullet.)  The .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire round is rapidly picking up steam, and is becoming quite popular, with many pistols, revolvers, and rifles being designed for it.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This round does not exist.

     Other Names: .17 Hornady Rimfire Magnum, .17 HMR

     Nominal Size: 4.32x27mm

     Actual Size: 4.32x26.72mm

     Case Type: Necked Rimfire

     Weight: 4.88 kg per case of 1000; Price: $80 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.004 kg

5-round box: 0.04 kg

9-round box: 0.06 kg

10-round box: 0.07 kg

25-round belt: 0.1 kg

50-round belt: 0.2 kg

100-round belt: 0.39 kg

 

 

.22 BB Cap

     Notes: This round is one of the oldest self-contained cartridges still available.  It is a “gallery” round, designed for indoor shooting at very short-range targets.  The round was made by many companies around the world until just before World War 2, but the kind of social shooting that spawned the .22 BB Cap went out of style at that point.  Originally, the .22 BB Cap has a round bullet in a short case and was propelled only by the primer, but later designs has a small powder charge and a conical bullet.  Today, the round is still occasionally used for indoor shooting, but it is also useful as a pest control round.  However, not many firearms are still chambered for the .22 BB Cap, and RWS of Germany is the only company still making the round.

     Other Names: .22 Bulleted Breech Cap

     Nominal Size: 5.6x7mm

     Actual Size: 5.64x7.21mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight: 0.23 kg per box of 100; Price: $6 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0014 kg

 

 

 

 

.22 CB Cap

     Notes: This round is basically a more powerful version of the .22 BB Cap, officially first appearing in ammunition catalogs in 1888, but probably invented before that time.  The .22 CB Cap is no more accurate than the .22 Short and slightly less powerful, and it is useful only for gallery shooting or pest control.  American companies stopped making the .22 CB Cap in 1942, but European companies such as CCI occasionally make lots of them, and RWS offers it on a regular basis and lists it in its catalogs. 

     Other Names: .22 Conical Bullet Cap, 6mm Flobert

     Nominal Size: 5.6x10mm

     Actual Size: 5.64x10.67mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight: 2.63 kg per case of 1000; Price: $40 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0021 kg

 

 

 

 

.22 Long

     Notes: This is forerunner of the .22 Long Rifle round.  The .22 Long round has a smaller bullet than a .22 Long Rifle round, similar to that of the .22 Short bullet, in a case similar to that of the .22 Long Rifle.  The propellant charge is smaller than that used in the .22 Long Rifle round, resulting in slightly less power.  Many believe that the .22 Long round has basically outlived its usefulness, and should be considered obsolete, but many modern manufacturers still make the round.  As with the .22 Short, most bolt-action, pump-action, and lever-action weapons chambered for .22 Long Rifle will also be able to fire the .22 Long round, but most .22 Long Rifle semiautomatics cannot.

     Nominal Size: 5.7x14mm

     Actual Size: 5.66x15.11mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight:  3.25 kg per case of 1000; Price $50 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.003 kg

5-round box: 0.03 kg

6-round box: 0.03 kg

7-round box: 0.03 kg

10-round box: 0.05 kg

12-round box: 0.05 kg

20-round box: 0.09 kg

 

 

.22 Long Rifle

     Notes: This round was originally developed as a blackpowder cartridge in 1887.  It successfully made the jump to smokeless powder, and is now one of the most common rounds in the world.  Though today it’s most popular use is in target matches and biathlon competitions, it is also one of the most common varmint and small game cartridges.  Many a youngster cut his teeth on a .22 Long Rifle-firing rifle, and we even used them for indoor target practice in ROTC.  It is, however, unreliable at killing anything larger than a rabbit; if fired out of a pistol-sized weapon, it is even less reliable.  Another use is with a silencer (and a very careful aim) for game culling, and as a silenced pistol round for assassination.  The main reason that the .22 Long Rifle round (and other rimfire rounds) can be so dangerous is that many people regard .22s as mere playthings, forgetting that any weapon can be lethal.

     Nominal Size: 5.7x17mm

     Actual Size: 5.66x15.11mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight:  3.75 kg per case of 1000; Price $60 per case

Magazine:

Per round: 0.003 kg

2-round box: 0.02 kg

4-round box: 0.02 kg

5-round box: 0.03 kg

5-round clip: 0.02 kg

6-round box: 0.03 kg

7-round box: 0.04 kg

8-round box: 0.04 kg

9-round box: 0.05 kg

10-round box: 0.05 kg

10-round clip: 0.03 kg

10-round cassette: 0.03 kg

11-round box: 0.06 kg

12-round box: 0.06 kg

15-round box: 0.08 kg

16-round box: 0.08 kg

20-round box: 0.1 kg

25-round box: 0.12 kg

28-round box: 0.14 kg

29-round box: 0.14 kg

50-round box: 0.24 kg

50-round helical: 0.29 kg

100-round helical: 0.57 kg

165-round pan: 0.76 kg

176-round pan: 0.81 kg

177-round pan: 0.82 kg

220-round pan: 1.02 kg

275-round pan: 1.27 kg

 

.22 Extra Long

     Notes:  This obsolescent round actually predates the .22 Long Rifle round, being introduced in 1880 as a blackpowder round.  It was used in several rifles of various types, as well as some Smith & Wesson revolvers, but has not been listed in any major ammunition catalogs since 1935.  This round will not chamber in .22 Long Rifle-firing weapons due to the length, but one can usually get .22 Short, .22 Long, or .22 Long Rifle rounds to chamber in weapons designed for the .22 Extra Long cartridge.  In power, the .22 Extra Long, if loaded with smokeless powder, exceeds that of the .22 Long Rifle only by a tiny degree.

     Nominal Size: 5.6x19mm

     Actual Size: 5.66x19.05mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight: 0.48 kg per box of 100; Price: $16 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0038 kg

 

 

 

 

.22 ILARCO

     Notes: The .22 ILARCO was designed in 1987 as an experimental round for the American-180 rimfire submachinegun.  It is basically a hot-loaded .22 Long Rifle round, with the heavier bullet of the .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire round and a strengthened .22 Long Rifle case with much more propellant.  This was done to increase the power of the American-180, which could not chamber the longer .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire round, without having to redesign the action and magazines.  The power is almost the same as that of the .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire.  The .22 ILARCO round never went into large-scale production, and the sale of the American-180 patent ensured this.  The .22 ILARCO is now a collector’s item.

     Other Names: .22 Short Magnum Rimfire, .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire Short

     Nominal Size: 5.7x17mm

     Actual Size: 5.69x15.11mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight: 4.84 kg per box of 100; Price: $15 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0038 kg

165-round pan: 0.86 kg

177-round pan: 0.92 kg

220-round pan: 1.14 kg

275-round pan: 1.43 kg

 

 

 

 

.22 Short

     Notes: This is the oldest American modern-style cartridge, having been in production since 1857.  The round was originally intended for self-defense, but rapidly proved inadequate for that purpose, and was converted to a gallery round – one that is intended for short-range target shooting, mostly indoors.  It is still used in some Olympic and other international target competitions.  Most bolt-action, pump-action, and lever-action weapons chambered for .22 Long Rifle will also be able to fire the .22 Short round, but most .22 Long Rifle semiautomatics cannot.  The .22 Short round is ideal for varmint or small bird hunting, but velocity drops off rapidly after about 50 meters. 

     Nominal Size: 5.7x11mm

     Actual Size: 5.66x10.74mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight:  2.75 kg per case of 1000; Price $50 per case

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0022 kg

5-round box: 0.02 kg

6-round box: 0.02 kg

7-round box: 0.03 kg

8-round box: 0.03 kg

10-round box: 0.04 kg

12-round box: 0.05 kg

20-round box: 0.07 kg

 

.22 Winchester Auto

     Notes: This round was used only in the Winchester M-1903 semiautomatic rifle.  It had a long life, but was finally dropped from production in the 1970s, even though it was pronounced obsolete in 1932. It was designed at a time when blackpowder rounds were still somewhat common, and meant to be able to be used with nothing but the then-new smokeless powder.  It is roughly the same in power with the .22 Long Rifle, but never really offered more than the fact that it used exclusively smokeless powder.  It is now almost impossible to find, and the rifle that fires it is a collector’s item.

     Other Names: .22 Winchester Automatic, .22 Winchester Auto Smokeless

     Nominal Size: 5.6x17mm

     Actual Size: 5.64x16.89mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight: 4.25 kg per box of 100; Price: $14 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.0034 kg

 

 

 

 

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

     Notes: Though many see this round as a magnum version of the .22 Long Rifle, the .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire round is actually based on the old .22 Winchester Rimfire round.  The .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire was perhaps the first of the “hyper-velocity” rimfire rounds, and quickly became very popular.  The magnum loading means that weapons have to be specially modified or designed to fire the cartridge.

     Other Names: .22 Magnum, .22 Magnum Rimfire

     Nominal Size: 5.7x24.5mm

     Actual Size: 5.69x26.72mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight:  6.75 kg per case of 1000; Price: $110 per case

Magazine:

Per round: 0.0054 kg

2-round box: 0.03 kg

3-round box: 0.04 kg

4-round box: 0.04 kg

5-round box: 0.05 kg

7-round box: 0.07 kg

9-round box: 0.09 kg

10-round box: 0.09 kg

10-round cassette: 0.07 kg

12-round box: 0.11 kg

15-round box: 0.14 kg

 

 

.22 Winchester Rimfire

     Notes: This (not to be confused with the Winchester Magnum Rimfire) round was introduced in 1890 for the Winchester 1890 pump-action rifle.  Originally, Winchester used a flat-nosed bullet, and Remington used a round-nosed bullet and called it the .22 Remington Special; later, this distinction was lost as Winchester went to a round-nosed bullet.  It was chambered in many pump-action, single-shot, and bolt-action rifles after its introduction, but has long been out of production, except for a special one-time production run in 1986 by Winchester.  The Winchester Rimfire has more power than the .22 Long Rifle, but not as much as the .22 Winchester Rimfire Magnum.  The .22 Winchester Rimfire will chamber and fire in most weapons that will chamber the .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire; .22 Short, Long, and Long Rifle round will not work in a .22 Winchester Rimfire weapon, because they are narrower than the .22 Winchester Rimfire and fit too loosely.

     Other Names: .22 Remington Special

     Nominal Size: 5.7x24mm

     Actual Size: 5.69x24.36mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight: 6.25 kg per box of 100; Price: $20 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.005 kg

 

 

 

 

.44 Henry Rimfire

     Notes: Though the .44 Henry Rimfire was one of the early cartridges in firearms history (it was developed for the original Henry rifle, and was originally a blackpowder round), it is now considered obsolete for most purposes and is chambered only in a few older revolvers which are no longer in production and in some newer reproductions. It was manufactured from 1860-1934 (with later production using modern propellants as well as blackpowder), but is now in the realm of handloaders, and they find it tricky to load.  The .44 Henry Rimfire is not considered a particularly powerful round, and is barely adequate for bringing down even medium game.  Large game is definitely out of its class.  It’s principal advantage is its short length, which allowed a rifle to carry many rounds within the tubular magazines of the lever-action rifles it was primarily chambered in during the late 1800s.  The .44-40 Winchester round is a heavily-updated and improved version of the .44 Henry Rimfire round.

     Other Names: .44 Henry Flat

     Nominal Size: 11.3x22mm

     Actual Size: 11.33x22.23mm

     Case Type: Straight Rimfire

     Weight: 1.97 kg per box of 100; Price: $36 per box

Magazines:

Per round: 0.018 kg