Canberra

     Notes: The initial requirement for what became the Canberra was issued in 1944 for an aircraft to replace bomber versions of the Mosquito.  The Air Ministry called for a medium bomber which had an ability to bomb from high altitude with a good level of accuracy.  The RAF received the first Canberra in 1951. The RAF, at the Canberra’s peak, had 900 Canberras; Australia also used 49 Canberras, and 403 modified forms designated B-57 Canberra were used by the US (and built by Martin in the US); other users include the Royal New Zealand Air Force and Indian Air Force. Later users of the Canberra include Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Pakistan, Rhodesia (current fate unknown), South Africa, Sweden, West Germany, Venezuela, and Peru.  The Canberra has sometimes been described as appearing to look like a scaled-up Gloster Meteor.

     English Electric deemed that the needed performance could be attained without the use of swept wings or tail.  The basic design presented to the Air Ministry, had numerous problems and several redesigns had to be carried out before the Air Ministry would accept the Canberra.  In addition, the Air Ministry seemed to have a great deal of difficulty deciding what featured they wanted in the future Canberra, also leading to several redesigns and tweaks.  Some of these were the use of uprated Avon RA 3 engines instead of the lower-rated Nene engines; the Canberra’s distinctive wingtip teardrop-shaped extra fuel tanks were added.  Early fight testing revealed instances of buffeting in the rudder and elevator; after these were corrected, pilots remarked that the Canberra handled more like a fighter than a bomber.

     The Martin B-57 Canberra will be covered in US Bombers.

 

RAF Canberras

     The first production version, the Canberra B.2, had 132 orders from the Air Ministry, in bomber, reconnaissance, and training variants.  As the advanced H2S Mk9 bombing radar meant for the B.2 was not ready for production when the B.2 was built, the B.2. had a glazed nose for a bombardier using an advanced version of the US Norden bombsight.  When the Korean War broke out, the demand for B.2s increased, with 196 more produced by English Electric, 75 by Avro and Handley Page, and 60 by Shorts.  The numbers of B.2s produced was greater than any other Canberra variant.  Many of these were stationed in Europe (largely Germany), though many were also sent to the far east, based in Japan.

     The B.2 used Rolls-Royce Avon RA 3 engines, one on each wing, developing 6500 pounds of thrust each. Each engine further drove a 6kW generator to power electrical avionics, as the engines did not provide enough power to electronics. At the rear were the two main fuel tanks; a further flexible-bag lace-supported fuel call was mounted in the forward fuselage, it’s flexible shape allowing it to fit around the bomb bay and avionics. The B.2 had ejection seats for the pilot and navigator, but the bombardier up front in the glazed nose had to release a hatchway under him, allowing him to fall free from the aircraft, along with his seat, which then separated normally.  The two bomb bays could carry a total of 4.5 tons, and in the B.2, this was limited to free-fall bombs. Underwing pylons could carry an additional 900 kilograms.  Due to the limits of its range, and its inability to carry the nuclear bombs of the time, the B.2 Canberra was generally relegated to the role of tactical comber. The PR.3 photo-reconnaissance version of the B.2 was modified by the addition of a 36-centimeter fuselage plug, forward of the wing and behind of the cockpit, to house seven types of cameras.  In addition, an additional fuel tank was mounted in the bomb bay to allow prolonged dash speeds. The PR.3 can carry stores on wing hardpoints, normally for ECM pods, though it is capable of armed reconnaissance. The Canberra T.4 trainer version of the B.2 differed primarily in being equipped with dual controls and duplication of flight instruments on both side of the cockpit, rather than having all of the navigation equipment.

     The B.5 served as the prototype for the B.6, which differed primarily in having a solid nose along with the addition H2S Mk9 radar bombing equipment.; the bombardier remained at his station in the nose.  The B.6 moved the main fuel tanks to the wings.  A slight, 0.3-meter fuselage stretch, mainly in the forward bomb bay, gave the B.6 the ability to carry the more modern weapons available in its day (about 1953), along with the ability to carry one of smaller nuclear weapons also available at the time.  The engines were replaced by Rolls-Royce Avon RA 7 engines, which had a thrust of 7490 pounds each.  Some 106 were built for the RAF by English Electric, and Shorts and Harland both built 49 for the RAF.  English Electric also built 12 for its first export customers.

     The B.15 was an upgraded B.6, designed for low-level tactical strikes. The avionics were modernized and fittings for two cameras were also carried, though the cameras were rarely carried on operational missions.  The B.15 was also equipped with LABS.  The B.15 could use the AS.30 ASM, carried on wing pylons, though to the size of the AS.30’s fins, only one hardpoint could be used when the Canberra was carrying AS.30s.  The B.16 was a further upgraded B.15, different primarily in having slightly uprated engines, with 7510 pounds thrust; they were also easier to maintain.

     An interdictor version of the B.6, designated the B(I).6, marked the beginning of the transition of the Canberra in the RAF to a more tactical, ground support role.  In the B(I).6, the rear bomb bay was taken up with a pack of four HS-404 20mm autocannons.  The front bomb bay could also be fitted out with a rotary launcher for 36 50mm Matra SNEB unguided rockets, which could be fired singly or in sets of three, six, 10, 20, or the full 36. The B(I).8 is a further modification of the B(I).6, with the forward fuselage redone to replace the side-by-side seating with a tandem arrangement, the canopy was also offset somewhat to the left.  This also allowed the addition of new avionics (and also some which were replaced by more modern, somewhat miniaturized components.  The B(I).6 and B(i).8 were still able to conduct the nuclear strike role using its forward bomb bay.  In both cases, underwing weapons carriage was increased, with the B(I).6 and B(I).8 primarily having underwing pylons for rockets and bombs.  Both had underwing carriage for 1.2 tons of stores.  The B(I).8 operated primarily as a long-range interdictor, ranging far behind enemy lines, due to the larger fuel load it carried. Due to their ground support roles, the B(I).6 and B(I).8 were fitted with the LABS (Low-Altitude Bombing System) to increase accuracy of bombing or rocketing as altitudes of 500 meters or less. The LABS could also be used in conjunction with nuclear weapon delivery. The B(I).6 and B(I).8 also had a secondary role as interceptors, and for this role were equipped with air intercept radar, and could carry radar-homing missiles and heat-seeking missiles on their wing pylons.  The B)I).8 also had the uprated engines of the B.16.

     The B.6(RC), was a very different animal than the B.6.  It was a specialist ELINT and EW version, with an enlarged nose for a more powerful forward-looking radar and a SLAR.  The bomb bays were primarily filled with its ELINT gear, recorders for the ELINT gear, radar and radio direction finders, and large amounts of ECM gear; they also carried two specialist crewmembers to operate the ELINT/EW suite.  The B.6(RC) was part reconnaissance aircraft and part electronic warfare aircraft.  Only four were built and went into operation.

     The PR.7 variant of the B.6 was another photoreconnaissance variant.  The PR.7 had restored its rear fuselage tanks, as well as having the mid-aircraft flexible bag storage and the new wing tanks.  It used the more powerful RA 7 engines of the B (I).8 and antilock brakes. 

     The PR.9 was a greatly-modified version of the PR.7, with the fuselage stretched by 27.72 meters, wingspan was increased by 1.22 meters to improve high-altitude operations, and Rolls-Royce Avon RA 27 engines, which put out 10,030 pounds thrust each. New types of cameras were installed, as well as a primitive form of SAR and look-down radar.

     As late as 1957, Canberras stationed overseas (other than Europe) had not yet been modified to deliver nuclear ordnance.

     The Canberra U.10 (later redesignated D.10) were B.2s converted to maneuvering target drones.  18 conversions were made.  The U.14 (later D.14 were six B.2s converted for the same role for the Royal Navy. These versions will not be otherwise covered here.

     T.17s were B.6(RC)s designed for training ELINT/EW crews.  An additional seat was added for an instructor.  Despite their training role, they are able to function as normal EW/ELINT aircraft, though they have updated components.  Unlike most Canberra trainers, the PR.9s do not have dual controls, the crewmembers being trained were the EW/ELINT crewmen. The T.17 were T.19s converted back into conventional training aircraft.

     Most T.x Canberras are training aircraft, and have dual controls.  They do have functioning weapon bays and have hardpoints typical for Canberras of their time period, to allow the trainees to practice bombing and rocketing.

     Four  B.2s were sold to the US; these were used to develop the Martin B-57 Canberra, and Martin received a license to build further B-57s in the US. However, not all B-57s were built by Martin.

 

RAAF Canberras

     After World War 2, the Royal Australian Air Force initiated Plan D, which called for a massive reorganization of the Air Force, including the replacement of propeller-driven aircraft by jets.  The acquisition of the Canberra was one of the first jets acquired; the first Canberras they got were based on the B.2, (designated B.20) followed soon thereafter by the B.5 (designated the B.50).  All of the Australian Canberras (48 in total) were built under license in Australia at the Government Aircraft Factories (GAF). One of the features the Australians requested was the capability for nuclear delivery, though the Australian Canberras never carried nuclear weapons and the Australians kept no nuclear weapons on their soil. Australian B.20s had additional fuel tanks in their wings, while B.50s retained their two rear fuel tanks.  Australian Canberra B.2s and B.5s had a single BDAR film camera to the rear of their rear weapons bay.

     Australian Canberras saw much combat use, including during the Malaysian Emergency (along with RZNAF and RAF Canberras), and in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War, where they deployed eight Canberras for the ground support role.  While their USAF counterparts were usually armed with a pack of M3 .50-caliber or 20mm autocannons, Australian Canberras were not so equipped and were strictly low-level bombers or rocketing aircraft.  In addition, Australian Canberras have been modified with the addition of an autopilot and enhanced navigation equipment, including allowing the use of radar beam navigation, TACAN, and the ability to home on a friendly radio or radar beam.  They also had updated navigation equipment and bombing equipment, including bombing radar and the H2S Mk9 equipment. Australian Canberras assigned to Vietnam (or for that matter, US B-57s) could not drop napalm canisters from their weapons bays, but could carry them on their hardpoints.

     As early as 1954, it was recognized that the Canberra was becoming obsolete. In particular, the Canberra did not have the range for targets in Indonesia, and it was judged that the Canberra would not fare well even against relatively aged aircraft like the MiG-17, Australia evaluated the (cancelled) BAC TSR.2, Dassault Mirage IV, F-4 Phantom II, and A-5 Vigilante, and even looked at the Vulcan and Victor, before settling on a modified version of the F-111C..Despite the procurement of the F-111, the Canberra remained in service until 1982. (Supposedly, if the RAAF had its way, it would have gone with the TSR.2, but the British seemed intent on cancelling the project.)

     The Australians used a small number of PR.7 (designated PR.17s)., The PR.7s saw extensive use in the Malaysian Emergency and over Indonesia, due to its increased range.

 

RZNAF Canberras

     New Zealander Canberras are B(I).8s modified by the addition of an autopilot and enhanced navigation including updated to allow radar beam navigation, TACAN, and the ability to home on a friendly radio or radar beam. 

 

Indian Air Force Canberras

     In 1972, the US sold the Indians a small number of Standard ARMs, later followed by Shrike ARMs.  The sale also included an unknown number of the then-new Paveway I laser-guided bombs, along with laser designators. This undisclosed sale included avionics for use of the missiles and ECM pods; it was not publicly acknowledged until the Indians retired their Canberras in 2007.  The Indians used B(I).5s (modified to B(I).6 standards), which were designated B(I).58s, and they bought 54 of them; six were modified for Wild Weasel duty, but used the same designation, The Wild Weasels were further modified with chaff and flare dispensers In Wild Weasels, the bombardier also functions as the EW officer, and has a downlinked TV viewer to spot the targets.  He also operates the EW gear and the ARMs. The Indians also bought eight PR-57 photo reconnaissance versions, and six T.4 training variants. Indian Air Force Canberras had autopilots and updated navigation gear, as per the RAAF Canberras above.

 

South African Canberras

     South African Canberras were B(I).8s, and were mostly used for armed reconnaissance.. with the gun pack and rocket pack in the weapons bays and rockets on the wing hardpoints., They were also modified with enhanced navigation gear and had an autopilot.  Radios had an encryption/decryption system (essentially a more clumsy system of secure radios).  Essentially, with different makes of avionics, they are the same as RZNAF Canberras.

 

Swedish Canberras

   The Swedish bought two B.2s in 1960, and then had them modified to T.11 trainers.  However, this was a ruse; in Sweden, the two Canberras were re-modified into EW/ELINT versions, similar to the B.6(RC), though with a more advanced ELINT suite.  They were officially designated as would be a training aircraft, with the designation of Tp.52, and referred to as “testing” aircraft. These aircraft were used primarily to eavesdrop on Soviet, Polish, and East German radio and radar emissions.  The modifications were not admitted to for ten years.

 

     Twilight 2000 v1/v2/v2,2s: The Canberra was primarily used in the Twilight War by Britain for reconnaissance, though it was sometimes used for attack, and other countries also used it for bombing.

     Twilight 2013: Few flying examples exist; most of these are employed In research (such as by NASA and the USGS).

     Merc 2000:Some Merc organizations looking for a non-descript bomber or jump aircraft (the paratroopers being carried in the weapons bays) employ Canberras

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

B.2

$7,135,859

JP-A

5.44 tons

20.86 tons

3

41

None

Enclosed

PR.3

$15,285,386

JP-A

900 kg

21.26 tons

3

49

Cameras (7)

Enclosed

B.6

$9,844,437

JP-A

6.06 tons

20.86 tons

3

41

Radar (100 km), Radar Bombing (60 km)

Enclosed

B(I).6

$17,259,665

JP-A

1.2 tons

21.38 tons

3

43

Radar (100 km), Radar Bombing (60 km)

Enclosed

B(I).8

$17,333,201

JP-A

1.2 tons

22.45 tons

3

44

Radar (100 km), Radar Bombing (60 km)

Enclosed

B.15

$11,024,374

JP-A

6.06 tons

20.96 tons

3

42

Radar (120 km), Radar Bombing (70 km)

Enclosed

B.16

$11,024,928

JP-A

6.08 tons

20.96 tons

3

42

Radar (120 km), Radar Bombing (70 km)

Enclosed

B.5(RC)

$20,628,875

JP-A

1.2 tons

24.7 tons

5

51

Radar (150 km), SLAR (150 km)

Enclosed

PR.7

$25,459,710

JP-A

1.2 tons

27.33 tons

3

52

Radar (150 km), SLAR (150 km)

Enclosed

PR.9

$43,026,595

JP-A

1.2 tons

28.7 tons

3

55

Radar (165 km), SLAR (165 km), Passive IR (35 km)

Enclosed

T.17

$31,769,147

JP-A

1.2 tons

24.9 tons

6

56

Radar (165 km), SLAR (165 km), Passive IR (35 km)

Enclosed

B.20

$8,288,111

JP-A

5.44 tons

21.06 tons

3

42

Bombing Radar (60 km)

Enclosed

B.50

$10,351,937

JP-A

6.06 tons

21.06 tons

3

42

Radar (100 km), Radar Bombing (60 km)

Enclosed

B(I).58

$15,589,853

JP-A

6.06 tons

21.08 tons

3

43

Radar (100 km), Radar Bombing (60 km)

Enclosed

B(I).58 (Indian Wild Weasel)

$39,301,130

JP-A

4.86 tons

21.09 tons

3

52

Radar (165 km), SLAR (165 km), Passive IR (35 km)

Enclosed

Tp.52

$42,510,004

JP-A

1.2 tons

25 tons

5

53

Radar (165 km), SLAR (165 km), Passive IR (35 km)

Enclosed

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Mnvr/Acc Agl/Turn

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Ceiling

Armor

B.2

1626

455 (87)

NA  19  6/4  60/40

10500

2642

15000

FF6  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

PR.3

1596

447 (87)

NA  19  6/4  60/40

15876

2642

18288

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B.6

1869

524 (87)

NA  22  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B(I).6

1824

511 (87)

NA  22  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B(I).8

1742

488 (87)

NA  21  6/4  60/40

12570

3050

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B.15

1860

517 (87)

NA  22  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B.16

1864

518 (87)

NA  22  6/4  60/40

11500

3050

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B.5(RC)

1580

439 (87)

NA  19  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15240

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

PR.7

1437

399 (87)

NA  17  6/4  60/40

18501

3050

15240

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

PR.9

1865

518 (77)

NA  22  5/4  50/40

19758

3050

17000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

T.17

1574

437 (87)

NA  19  6/4  60/40

11500

3050

15240

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B.20

1611

448 (87)

NA  19  6/4  60/40

11500

2642

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B.50

1852

514 (87)

NA  22  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B)I).58

1850

514 (87)

NA  22  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

B(I).58 (Indian Wild Weasel)

1849

514 (87)

NA  22  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

1562

434 (87)

NA  19  6/4  60/40

11500

3044

15000

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

Tp.52

2568

435 (87)

NA  19  6/4  60/40

13500

3044

15500

FF8  CF7  RF6  T5  W5

 

Vehicle

Combat Equipment

Minimum Landing/Takeoff Zone

RF

Armament

Ammo

B.2

IFF, Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Advanced Norden Bombsight, LORAN, Radar Beam Riding, Radio Beacon Detection

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+1

2xInternal Weapons Bay, 2 Hardpoints*

PR.3

IFF, RWR, Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Cameras (Four Film Cameras, Three IR Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), ECM 1

1020/805m Hardened Runway

Nil

2 Hardpoints*******

 

B.6

IFF, RWR, Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), LORAN

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2xInternal Weapons Bay, 4 Hardpoints**

 

B(I).6

IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, Optic Gunsight, LABS, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), LORAN, ECM 1

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2xInternal Weapons Bay (One w/4x20mm Gun Pack, One with 36-round Matra Rocket Pod), 4 Hardpoints***

2880x20mm HS404, 36x50mm Matra Rockets.

B(I).8

IFF, RWR ,Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, Optic Gunsight, LABS, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), Radar Beam Riding Navigation, LORAN, ECM 1

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2xInternal Weapons Bay (One w/4x20mm Gun Pack, One with 36-round Matra Rocket Pod), 4 Hardpoints***

2880x20mm HS404, 36x50mm Matra Rockets.

B.15

IFF, RWR, Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, Optic Gunsight, LABS, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), Radar Beam Riding Navigation, LORAN, ECM 1, One Film Camera, One IR Camera

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2 Weapon Bays, 4 Hardpoints****

 

B.16

IFF, RWR, Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, Optic Gunsight, LABS, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), Radar Beam Riding Navigation, LORAN, ECM 1, One Film Camera, One IR Camera

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2 Weapon Bays, 4 Hardpoints*****

 

B.5(RC)

IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, RDF, Radar Direction Finder, Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), Radar Beam Riding Navigation, LORAN, ECM 2, ELINT 2, Two Film Cameras, Two IR Cameras

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

4 Hardpoints*****

 

PR.7

IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Cameras (Four Film Cameras, Three IR Cameras, One Radar Camera), Radio Beacon Detection Optic Gunsight, (100 km), ECM 2

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

4 Hardpoints*******

 

PR.9

IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Cameras (Four Film Cameras, Two Panoramic Film Cameras, Two Panoramic IR Cameras, Primitive SAR (10 km), Three IR Cameras, Two Radar Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection, Optic Gunsight, (100 km), ECM 2

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

4 Hardpoints*******

 

T.17

IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, RDF, Radar Direction Finder, Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), Radar Beam Riding Navigation, LORAN, ECM 2, ELINT 2, Two Film Cameras, Two IR Cameras

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

4 Hardpoints*******

 

B.20

IFF, Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, LORAN, TACAN, Radar Beam Riding, Radio Beacon Detection, Autopilot

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2xInternal Weapons Bay, 2 Hardpoints*

 

B.50

IFF, RWR, Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, LABS, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), LORAN, TACAN, Autopilot

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2xInternal Weapons Bay, 2 Hardpoints*

 

B(I).58

IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, Optic Gunsight, LABS, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), LORAN, TACAN, ECM 1, Autopilot

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

2 Weapon Bays, 4 Hardpoints*****

 

B(I).58 (Indian Wild Weasel)

IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Two 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, Radar Bombsight, Optic Gunsight, LABS, Cameras (Two Film Cameras), Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), RDF, Radar Direction Finder, LORAN, TACAN, ECM 2, Flare Chaff (6/10), Laser Rangefinder/Designator, Autopilot

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+3

2 Weapon Bays, 4 Hardpoints*******

2 Standard ARMs or 4 Shrike ARMs

Tp.52

Advanced IFF, RWR, Secure Radios (Three 300 km, One AM), Transponder, Gyrocompass, Barometric Altimeter, RDF, Radar Direction Finder, Radio Beacon Detection (100 km), Radar Beam Riding Navigation, LORAN, ECM 2, IRCM 1, ELINT 2, Two Film Cameras, Two IR Cameras, Flares/Chaff (6/6)

1020/805m Hardened Runway

+2

  4 Hardpoints*****

 

*Hardpoints may carry only 900 kilograms; weapons bays may carry then 4.54 tons if the hardpoints are filled.

**Hardpoints may carry 1200 kilograms; weapons bays may then carry 4.86 tons if the hardpoints are filled.

***Hardpoints may carry 1200 kilograms, If the forward weapons bay is not taken up with a rocket launcher, the bay may carry up to 3.03 tons of other ordnance.

****Though the B.15 can carry 1200 kg on its hardpoints; however, if it does so, the Canberra may carry only 4.86 tons in its weapon bays   Though the B.15 has four hardpoints, the fins of the AS.30 are large enough that only two AS.30s may be carried.

*****Though the B.16 can carry 1200 kg on its hardpoints; however, if it does so, the Canberra may carry only 4.88 tons in its weapon bays   Though the B.16 has four hardpoints, the fins of the AS.30 are large enough that only two AS.30s may be carried.

******The B.5(RC) can carry 1200 kg on its hardpoints

.

*******These aircraft can carry bombs and rockets on their hardpoints, and are capable of conducting armed reconnaissance. However, their hardpoints, when used, are normally taken up with ECM pods or chaff and flare pods.  The PR.3 can carry 900 kg; the PR.7, PR.9, and T.17 may carry 1200 kg.           

********The Indian Wild Weasels can carry ARMs on their hardpoints.  Standard ARMs are too big and heavy to carry more than two on the hardpoints.  Four  Shikes, however, may be carried.  ARMs may not be carried in the weapon bays (they normally carried HE bombs to “finish the job.”).  If ARMs are not carried  (the Wild Weasel may carry 6.06 tons in its Weapon Bays.