Le Francaise Model 28 Military

Notes: Though this pistol was designed in 1929 specifically for French Army service by Manufrance, the French Army decided to almost completely pass on the design and relatively few were taken into service. French civilians liked the Military (also known as the "Armee"), however, and they were sold commercially until 1939. Most were made to fire 9mm Browning Long ammunition, but a few rare ones were chambered for .25 ACP or .32 ACP. Operation is by simple blowback and the empty shells are ejected by gas pressure. The Military uses a tip-up barrel that not only allows quick cleaning of the bore, but allows the shooter to load cartridges into the breech and fire them whether or not a magazine is inserted. The barrel is a full 5 inches long. The Military was a hot seller until the late 1950s, and they can still be found in France in good numbers. The biggest defect is that the Military has NO safety mechanism of any kind at all.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Military

9mm Browning Long

1.09 kg

8

$258

Military

.32 ACP

0.77 kg

8

$193

Military

.25 ACP

0.53 kg

8

$147

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Military (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Military (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Military (.25)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

MAB Model A/B

Notes: Built from 1921-65, the MAB Model A (also called the "Brequette") was essentially a French version of the Browning "Baby" M-1906. Most of these pistols were carried as self-defense weapons by civilians, though about 1130 of them were built during the Nazi occupation in World War 2 and used by the Vichy French government.

The plastic grip plates of the Model A were of better quality than the Browning with finer checkering, and construction quality was in general better than that of the M-1906. The Model A also had a manual slide catch/safety, a magazine safety, and an unlocked breech system. Until 1948, the parts of the Model A were almost entirely milled and machined; in 1948, however, the internal operating parts of the Model A were changed to stamped parts. Starting in 1954, the rifling of the barrels was done by automatic machinery instead of by manual machinery.

Built from 1932-49, the Model B was internally similar to the Model A, but externally looked more like Beretta or Walther pocket pistols of the period. The Model B had a barrel shroud that was integral with the frame, and the slide was open-topped for over half its length like many Berettas of the period. The Model B is even smaller than the Model A, including a shorter barrel and grip.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model A

.25 ACP

0.38 kg

6

$82

Model B

.25 ACP

0.31 kg

5

$81

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model A

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

3

Model B

SA

-1

Nil

0

5

Nil

3

MAB Model C/D

Notes: The Model D was essentially a clone of the Browning M-1910. It resembles the M-1910 in most respects, with a 3.5-inch barrel, but the grip of the Model C is deep – long from the front to the back of the grip. It looks strange, but allows for a surprisingly good hold on the pistol. The Model C sold mostly to civilians, though there were some police sales in France.

Alongside the Model C, MAB produced the Model D. Though designed for police use, the Model D primarily found employment in civilian hands and in the hands of the World War 2 Vichy government police in France. It is a medium-weight weapon using low-power ammunition, so barrel jump and muzzle blast are low. The Model D is similar in appearance and design to the Model C, but has a barrel length of 4 inches. Many of these pistols were built after the Nazi invasion of France; these have German Army test and acceptance stamps on them. Originally, the Model D was built using a steel frame, but later ones used a light alloy frame.

Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model D, though an old design, was still in production at the beginning of the Twilight War and was easy to find in Western Europe and Africa.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model C

.32 ACP

0.7 kg

7

$178

Model C

.380 ACP

0.89 kg

7

$216

Model D (Steel Frame)

.32 ACP

0.73 kg

9

$183

Model D (Alloy Frame)

.32 ACP

0.67 kg

9

$184

Model D (Steel Frame)

.380 ACP

0.93 kg

9

$221

Model D (Alloy Frame)

.380 ACP

0.85 kg

9

$223

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model C (.32 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Model C (.380 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Model D (.32 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Model D (.380 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

MAB Model P

Notes: A distant descendant of the Model D, the Model P is a militarized version of another descendant of the Model D, the Model R. The two primary versions of the Model P – the PA-8 and PA-15 – began manufacture in 1966 as an independent effort by MAB to introduce a new military pistol to the world market. As the French military’s MAS Mle 1950s became too worn in and spare parts became scarce in the 1970s, the French bought the PA-15 and used it until the early 1990s, when it was largely replaced by the PAMAS G1. In 1991, Zastava in Serbia was given the rights to license-produce the Model P, though it appears that Zastava never actually manufactured any Model Ps.

The Model P uses a complicated mechanism, featuring a rotating-barrel lock with several internal and external safety features. Operation is based on a very old design, the Savage-Searle system, dating back to 1905. The Model P is therefore very reliable and safe, but when a Model P breaks, it really breaks. In addition, the complicated mechanism is difficult and expensive (in real-life terms) to manufacture. The PA-8 and PA-15 are essentially the same pistols except for their magazine capacities and the width of their grips, with each having 4.5-inch barrels. A further version, the PA-PF1, is a target model with a 5.5-inch barrel and micrometer-adjustable sights. The PA-PF1 is still popular with the French military competition shooting team.

Merc 2000 Notes: As these weapons were also built by Zastava of Yugoslavia, it is inevitable that they ended up all over the planet.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PA-8

9mm Parabellum

1.06 kg

8

$241

PA-15

9mm Parabellum

1.08 kg

15

$243

PA-PF1

9mm Parabellum

1.13 kg

15

$257

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PA-8

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

PA-15

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

PA-PF1

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Manurhin 22 Sport

Notes: This light pistol grew out of French manufacture of the Walther PP series of pistols shortly after World War 2 (Walther was prohibited from making firearms until 1955). Manurhin continued to make PP-series weapons until 1985 (sending them to Walther after manufacture for sale), and during that time, developed the Manurhin 22 Sport pistol. This weapon is basically a Walther PP with longer barrels.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Manurhin 22 Sport (6" Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.64 kg

8

$139

Manurhin 22 Sport (7.5" Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.67 kg

8

$156

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Manurhin 22 Sport (6")

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Manurhin 22 Sport (7.5")

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

MAS Mle 1935

Notes: After World War 1 the St Etienne Arsenal was asked by the French government to design a new service pistol for the French military. A Swiss designer working for St Etienne, Charles Petter, took an existing Browning design and modified it by making the firing mechanism a removable module, changing the recoil spring housing, and adding magazine and slide safety catches. This became the Mle 1935A. The first Mle 1935As were delivered to the French Army in 1937, but less than 11,000 had been built by the time of the French surrender to the Nazis in 1940, and far less were actually issued to French troops. The Nazis kept the Mle 1935A in production, issuing it to police and collaborators as well as occupying Nazi troops, and called it the P-625(f). Under Nazi occupation, almost 24,000 were built. After World War 2, the Mle 1935A remained in production until 1950, and were issued to French troops and the Foreign Legion alike. Captured examples were encountered by American troops throughout the Vietnam War; in addition, due to wide use by the Foreign Legion in Algeria, the Mle 1935A also worked its way into most of North Africa, where some are still in use today. French police themselves also used the Mle 1935A well into the 1980s. The plans for the Mle 1935A were also sold to SiG in the late 1930s, and the Mle 1935A’s influence can be seen in the P-210.

After World War 2, the Mle 1935A was modified later by greatly simplifying the method of locking, reshaping the butt, and a few other changes, becoming the Model 1935S. (These changes were made primarily to quicken and simplify production, but also made the Mle 1935S a more modern pistol.) The pistol also got a little heavier and the barrel was made a bit longer. In addition, production was transferred from MAS (which had suffered a lot of damage during World War 2, to Manufrance while MAS got back on its feet. Manufrance built about 10,000 themselves, after which production was transferred to Chautellerault, and later to SACM. (This allowed those firms to work on their own projects while still maintaining production of the Mle 1935S.) Chautellerault and SACM also made parts kits, which were assembled at the Tulle Arsenal.

Both versions had modern features like a chamber-loaded indicator, a magazine safety, and simple checkered black plastic grips plates. The Mle 1935A uses a 4.3-inch barrel; the Mle 1935S’s barrel is a tad longer at 4.4 inches. The Mle 1935 is rarely seen outside of France, but the pistol is not the problem. The Mle 1935 fired the weak and unusual 7.65mm Longue cartridge (sort of an imperfect version of the .30 Pederson cartridge); few other countries wanted the weapons that actually fired it.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mle 1935A

7.65mm Longue

0.68 kg

8

$204

Mle 1935S

7.65mm Longue

0.77 kg

8

$207

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mle 1935A

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Mle 1935S

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

MAS Mle 1950

Notes: The standard French military service pistol until 1988, and then again in the early 2000s, the Mle 1950 essentially combined the Mle 1935A with the improvements of the Mle 1935S, upsized to take the 9mm Parabellum round. In addition, the magazine release was relocated from the butt to behind the trigger. Many Mle 1950s were sold or given to former French colonies in Africa during the 1950s, and remain in service in those countries until this day.

As said, the Mle 1950 is essentially an older pistol upsized to take the 9mm Parabellum round and with some other improvements. This makes the Mle 1950 heavier than either the Mle 1935A or Mle 1935S. A few other minor improvements were also made, but the mechanism is still essentially that of the Mle 1935.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mle 1950

9mm Parabellum

0.89 kg

8

$242

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mle 1950

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

PAMAS G1

Notes: This is a Beretta M-92G made under license by Giat in France. Most of the pistol is a virtual copy of the M92G, except for the safety/decocking lever combination. And that’s the problem: The French military encountered the same slide cracking problems as the US military, and temporarily brought the MAS Mle 1950s back out of storage in the early 2000s. French Army and Navy special operations units switched to the SiG-Sauer P-226 and the Heckler & Koch USP, while much of the rest of the military and police re-armed with the SiGPro 2022 in 2002. The PAMAS is still used in limited quantities by the Gendarmerie and the French Air Force.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PAMAS G1

9mm Parabellum

0.96 kg

15

$248

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PAMAS G1

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Unique Bcf-66 Police

Notes: This pistol was introduced in 1954 for police forces. It is similar to many Beretta designs of the period, and has several safeties to help insure that the weapon cannot be fired accidentally. These include a manual safety, a magazine safety, and a half-cock safety. The magazine release is on the heel of the grip, as with many pistols of the period. There is no external slide catch, but the slide still remains to the rear after the magazine is emptied. Production of this weapon stopped in 1980.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Bcf-66 Police

.32 ACP

0.71 kg

9

$183

Bcf-66 Police

.380 ACP

0.79 kg

8

$221

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Bcf-66 Police (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Bcf-66 Police (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Unique Model D/E

Notes: Depending on the exact type of one of these pistols, the Unique Model D and E are small-caliber pistols for plinking, recreational use, or target shooting. They were introduced in 1954. The Model D2 is a plinker’s weapon; it has a 4.25" barrel, an interchangeable front sight, and a laterally-adjustable rear sight. The D2 is still in production. The Model D4 is a target pistol with a barrel of 8.5 inches, a muzzle brake, provision for a barrel counterweight of up to 425 grams, and an interchangeable front sight and laterally-adjustable rear sight. Production of the D4 stopped in 1974. The D6 is a weapon that is normally for recreational shooting, but has the accuracy for target shooting; it has a 6-inch barrel, with the same sights as the D2. The D6 is still in production. The Model E4 is designed for rapid-fire shooting competitions; it fires .22 Short, has an 8.5" barrel with a muzzle brake, and the same sights as the other versions. The E4 was manufactured until 1975.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model D2

.22 Long Rifle

0.68 kg

10

$122

Model D4

.22 Long Rifle

0.79 kg

10

$215

Model D6

.22 Long Rifle

0.72 kg

10

$139

Model E4

.22 Short

0.74 kg

6

$200

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model D2

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Model D4

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

16

Model D6

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Model E4

SA

-2

Nil

2

2

Nil

17

Unique Rr-51 Police/Fr-51 Police

Notes: These are two police pistols introduced in 1951. They look identical, and somewhat misshapen, with a short slide and frame and relatively long grip. Both have a magazine release on the frame, as well as a safety catch. They were both used by French police at one point; however, neither is anymore. The Fr-51 stopped being manufactured in 1975, but the Rr-51 is still being made.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Rr-51

.32 ACP

0.75 kg

9

$175

Fr-51

.380 ACP

0.83 kg

8

$213

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Rr-51

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Fr-51

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8