MAG-95/98

     Notes: This Polish pistol utilizes a Western approach to pistols, such as a Browning action, double-action trigger, chrome plated barrel, and 9mm Parabellum ammunition.  In addition, these pistols have a DA/SA trigger and a decocker similar to those used on SiG-made pistols.  The MAG-95 is equally suited to right- and left-handed firers, and is well balanced.  The MAG-98 uses a recoil buffer, and has tritium inserts for its sights.  A variant of the MAG-98, the MAG-98c, has an adjustable rear sight; this version is otherwise identical to the MAG-98 for game purposes.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Most of these weapons were snapped by special ops units in Poland.  The MAG-98 is almost nonexistent, however, in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is an international best seller.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MAG-95

9mm Parabellum

1.05 kg

10, 15, 20

$244

MAG-98

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

10, 15, 20

$319

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MAG-95

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

MAG-98

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

Radom P-64

     Notes: This pistol was replaced by the P-83 in Polish service in the early 1980s.  Externally, it resembles the Makarov; internally, it more resembles the Walther PP.  The P-64 is a basic blowback pistol that can be difficult to aim due to poorly-designed sights (though the rear sight is dovetailed in and can be replaced).  It has several features inherited from its Walter PP heritage, such as a slide-mounted safety/decocker and a chamber-loaded indicator.  Oddly, while the P-64 has a slide catch, but the catch has no manual release – the shooter must pull back on the slide to release it.  The magazines are similar in design to those of the PP (though not interchangeable), and the P-64 even has a finder rest at the bottom of the grip.  The P-64 is a rather small pistol, with a short 3.3-inch barrel and only 6.1 inches in length total.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: A large number of Polish forces, particularly reserves and militia, were still equipped with this weapon during the Twilight War.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-64

9mm Makarov

0.62 kg

6

$144

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-64

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

Radom P-83 Wanad

     Notes: This pistol first entered service in late 1970s, the idea being to replace the P-64 in Polish service with a weapon that is cheaper and easier to produce.  It is generally similar to the P-64, but generally using pressings, stampings, and welding.  The weapon is usually finished in black oxide, though some have a bright or dull chrome finish.  One of the objectives was to produce a pistol equivalent to Makarov, but cheaper to produce; the real-life price is much less than a Makarov, but the P-83 also has a relatively rough appearance.  The magazines are compatible with the Makarov and vice versa.  The sights are fixed, but the rear sight is dovetailed into the slide.  The manual safety also automatically decocks the P-83, and unlike the P-64, the P-83 has a proper slide lock.  The P-83 is often called the “Wanad” after the name of the development and trials program that produced the P-83.

     The Wanad may also be fitted with a gas cartridge/blank cartridge/rubber bullet firing adapter.  This device is a muzzle attachment and when equipped with it, the Wanad is known as the P-83G.  An alternative attachment may be used for firing flares, though the nomenclature is the same when this device is attached to the Wanad.  The pistol itself is not loaded to fire this ammunition, and the caliber of the base pistol is not important for using the devices.  The muzzle attachments add 0.1 kg each to the weight of the ammunition as well as one bulk level (as the attachments are large and round.) The attachments each hold four rounds.  Gas rounds may be CS (common) or a tranquilizer gas (extremely rare). When used with blank cartridges, the P-83G is suitable for use as a starter’s pistol at sporting events (and used as such in Poland).

     The P-93 is an updated version of the P-83 described before.  The P-93 is more conducive to two-handed shooting, with a squared-off trigger guard front (for putting the index finger of the supporting hand).  The P-93 is safer to carry, with a hammer safety, and has an adjustable high-contrast rear sight and high-contrast front sight.      

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon equipped almost 50% of pistol-armed Polish forces in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  Almost none of these fired .380 ACP.  The P-93 was very rare; production was never high, and the special operations community rejected it and its cartridge in favor of the MAG-95 and others. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-83 Wanad

9mm Makarov

0.73 kg

8

$146

P-83 Wanad

.380 ACP

0.7 kg

8

$139

Muzzle Attachment

N/A

0.1 kg

4 Internal

$30

P-93

9mm Makarov

0.75 kg

8

$150

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-83 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-83 (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-83G (Gas)

SA

-1*

Nil

2

2

Nil

5

P-83G (Flare)

SA

(B25)

Nil

2

2

Nil

25

P-93

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

Radom Wz/35 (“Radom”)

     Notes: This may be the best combat pistol ever made that no one knows about.  The Wz/35 is perhaps better known by the name “Radom,” as at the time of its inception it was the best-known product of the Polish State Arsenal at Radom.  It is similar in operation to the Browning High-Power, but the mechanism makes recoil less violent than even the Browning, and also limits wear on the moving parts.  It can be cocked with the thumb, and the only safety is a grip safety, allowing quick times into action.  Pre-World War 2 Radoms are of excellent quality; during World War 2, the Germans forced the Poles to make them very quickly for the Nazis, and quality decreased dramatically.  Production stopped with World War 2, but resumed in 1994, at their former quality.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Production of the Radom never resumed in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Radom

9mm Parabellum

1.05 kg

8

$243

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Radom

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

 

WITU WIST-94

     Notes: Sometimes known by the name “Piryt” after it’s developmental name, the WIST-94 is to be the Polish sidearm of the future.  Development of the WIST-94 took a while from the first prototype in 1992, the preproduction prototype in 1994, and its choice in 1997 as the new standard Polish sidearm.  This was due to budgetary problems in Poland and dissatisfaction with the earlier prototypes by special operations units in Poland.  Therefore, full-scale production only recently began, though low-rate production has been going on for several years.  Poland has not released the number of WIST-94s built and issued so far, but they are believed to have gone to special operations and air assault units first.  WIST-94s are carried by Polish units participating in the current war in Iraq.

     The WIST-94 is a modern combat pistol using a modified Browning action.  The 4.5-inch barrel uses modern polygonal rifling that reduces barrel wear and imparts better ballistic properties to the bullet.  The trigger action is a DAO-type based on the Glock pistols, and the only safeties are an automatic firing pin safety and a trigger safety; there are no manual safeties.  The magazine catch is reversible for use by lefties.  The WIST-94 has a slide stop, and a release on the left side.  The sights are fixed and use a three-dot tritium-inlay arrangement.  The Frame is polymer, with a steel slide and working parts.

     The WIST-94L is identical, except for a small integral laser aiming module ahead of the trigger guard under the dust cover.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The WIST-94 is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

WIST-94

9mm Parabellum

0.73 kg

13

$244

WIST-94L

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

13

$644

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

WIST-94

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11