Beholla

     Notes:  This weapon was designed for use by the German military during World War 1 (one of at least 15 pistols used by the Germans during that war).  It was made by a dozen manufacturers, but only one after World War 1: Leonhardt and Menz.  These pistols, despite their rather crude appearance, are tough and reliable and many are in the hands of European civilians to this day.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Beholla

.32 ACP

0.64 kg

7

$114

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Beholla

SA

1

Nil

0

3

Nil

6

 

Campo-Giro

     Notes:  One of dozens of pistols used by the Spanish military before World War 2, the Campo-Giro was named for its designer, the Count of Campo-Giro.  It was the predecessor of several later Astra designs.  The Campo-Giro is entirely recoil-operated, relying on a very powerful recoil spring to operate the mechanism.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Campo-Giro

9mm Largo

0.95 kg

7

 

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Campo-Giro

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

Eibar

     Notes:  The Eibar is almost exclusive to Spain.  Due to the virtually nonexistent patent laws in Spain in the early 20th century, scores of Spanish firearms makers produced copies of the Browning M-1903 and M-1906, and these copies are collectively known as “Eibars.”  Most of these gunmakers built the Eibars in response to the needs of the French and Italian armies during World War 1, but production went on until the Spanish Civil War.  The Eibars will have the same basic design, but may vary wildly in finish, materials, quality, and other details.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Eibar

.25 ACP

0.43 kg

7

$130

Eibar

.32 ACP

0.67 kg

7

$176

Eibar

.380 ACP

0.86 kg

7

$215

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Eibar (.25)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

Eibar (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Eibar (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

 

Firestorm

     Notes: Firestorm Inc. split off from Astra in the late 1990s, and has since been producing its own firearms and distributing them through SGS in the United States.  Their namesake pistol is the Firestorm, a compact DA pistol of largely steel construction.  There are some passive safeties, a decocker, a manual safety, and a manual slide release.  In addition, the Firestorm has a mechanism that locks the hammer, trigger, and firing pin with a key inserted into the grip.  Grips are anatomically-shaped rubber, and sights are 3-dot combat-type sights.  Barrel length is 3.5 inches.  Finishes may be matte black, bright nickel, matte nickel, or duo-tone (a matte black frame with either a bright or matte nickel slide).

     The Mini-Firestorm is actually about the same size as the Firestorm, and actually fires larger calibers than the basic Firestorm.  The Firestorm and Mini-Firestorm are basically the same, but the Mini-Firestorm uses white outline target-type sights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Firestorm

.22 Long Rifle

0.65 kg

10

$88

Firestorm

.32 ACP

0.71 kg

10

$120

Firestorm

.380 ACP

0.74 kg

7

$139

Mini-Firestorm

9mm Parabellum

0.69 kg

10

$147

Mini-Firestorm

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.74 kg

10

$184

Mini-Firestorm

.45 ACP

0.78 kg

7

$226

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Firestorm (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

0

2

Nil

6

Firestorm (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Firestorm (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Mini-Firestorm (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Mini-Firestorm (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Mini-Firestorm (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

 

Gabilondo Plus Ultra

     Notes: Gabilondo is an Eibar-based company founded in 1904 to produce inexpensive revolvers, and is actually the parent company of several of the other companies listed here (such as Llama and Eibar), as they soon found themselves so swamped with orders that they had to greatly expand their business as well as subcontracting their work to possibly as many as a dozen other gunmaking companies.  One of their more unusual-looking pistols was the Plus Ultra.

     The Plus Ultra was based, as many Spanish pistols of the period, on the Browning M-1903, but differed in minor details internally and externally looked quite different, and a bit strange.  Built from 1925-33, it figured heavily in the Spanish Civil War, particularly with the International Brigades.  (Rumors say that the Plus Ultra was originally designed for export to the Japanese Military, but this is considered unlikely.) Most of the Plus Ultra looks like a conventional Eibar-type M-1903 clone, but the grip is abnormally long, in order of accommodate a single-stack 20-round magazine.  Despite this unorthodox construction, it actually sold pretty well – mainly because many Spanish troops and civilians equated a pistol’s size with it’s quality – to them “big” equaled “good.”  Except for the long magazine and grip, the Plus Ultra was essentially a conventional Eibar-type M-1903 clone.  Construction is basically of steel, with bakelite pistol grip plates and a 5-inch barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Plus Ultra

.32 ACP

1.27 kg

20

$214

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Plus Ultra

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

 

Llama Large Frame/Small Frame Series

     Notes: This Llama series of automatic pistols is based on the Colt M-1911, but there are numerous differences internally, and the Llama series was produced in a very wide variety of sizes and calibers.  The first of this Llama series of pistols, was introduced in 1931, and the series went on from there, through the Max series (which is dealt with in a separate entry below).  They were used both by Spanish forces and exported far and wide, especially to North, Central, and South America.  (In the US, they were imported by Stoeger prior to 1993, and by Import Sports after 1993, though they are marked “Made in Spain” to comply with US regulations.)

     The Llama Large Frame models follow to a great extent the design of the M-1911, but some were built with grip safeties, and some without them.  A few are double-action weapons, but most were single-action designs like the M-1911.  Small Frames, on the other hand, were mostly simple blowback-operated pistols with considerable differences internally from the original M-1911 design.  Like the Large Frames, some do not use grip safeties, and some were not single-action designs.

     The Model I was produced starting in 1933, and manufactured until 1954.  It is considered a small-frame model, with a 3.62-inch barrel and firing a relatively small cartridge.  It does not have a grip safety.  In 1954, it was replaced by the Model I-A; this is basically the same weapon with the addition of a grip safety, and was manufactured until 1976.  (Both are identical for game purposes.)  The Model II, relatively unsuccessful due to mechanical problems, was introduced at the same time, but was discontinued in 1937.  It has no grip safety.  The Model III replaced the Model II, correcting the mechanical problems of the Model II, and was manufactured until 1954.  (The Model II and III are identical for game purposes).  The Model III-A replaced the Model III in 1955, and added a grip safety, and later a ventilated aiming rib atop the slide and checkered polymer grip plates with a thumbrest at the bottom.  Late production Model III-As were also quite a bit heavier than the early-production Model III-As; early production Model III-As are also identical to the Model II and Model III for game purposes.  Late production Model III-As were manufactured until at least 1998, though they were possibly built in small amounts until the early 2000s.

     The Model IV was not only the first of these Llama pistols (introduced in 1931, and manufactured until 1954), it was a large frame model.  Though it was not chambered for .45 ACP, it was produced in two chamberings, one of which was the powerful 9mm Largo round.  The Model IV had no grip safety.  The Model V was built specifically for export to the US; markings are in English, and it is chambered for a different round than the Model IV.  It was introduced a few months after the Model IV, and produced until 1954.  The Model VI is also virtually the same as the Models IV and V, but chambered for a different cartridge than the Model V, and it was exported to a number of countries other than the US.  In 1932, the Model VII variant of the Model IV was introduced for the powerful .38 Super round.  The Model VIII is basically a version of the Model VII chambered for three different cartridges.  It was introduced until 1935 until 1954, when it was replaced by the improved Model VIII-A. It was produced until 1976, when it was replaced by the Model VIII-C; this was simply a re-styled Model VIII-A so that it looked more like the Colt M-1911A1, but was also a physically shorter weapon and uses a large-capacity double-stack magazine. It was produced until 1992.  (All three Model VIII versions are identical, except for their chamberings, for game purposes.)  Except for the Model VIII-A and VIII-C, none of these versions have grip safeties.  The large-frame models of these pistols generally had 5-inch barrels.

     Another large-frame offering was the Model IX, produced from 1936-54.  It was originally introduced only in .45 ACP, but more chamberings were later offered.  The Model IX had no grip safety, but in 1954 it was replaced by the Model IX-A, which did have a grip safety, and was produced from 1954-76.  It was chambered only for .45 ACP.  (The Model IX-A is otherwise identical to the Model IX for game purposes.)  The Model IX-B was a modernized IX-A produced from 1976-92, and had an extended spur hammer, extended slide release, and checkered black plastic grip plates instead of the smooth wooden ones of earlier models.  In 1977, the Model IX-C was introduced; it is essentially a Model IX-B with a slightly wider grip to accommodate a larger-capacity magazine, a ventilated sighting rib atop the slide, 3-dot sights, rubber grips instead of plastic, and a slightly longer 5.125-inch barrel.  The Model IX-D was a compact version of the IX-C, with a 4.25-inch barrel and otherwise retaining the features of the Model IX-C.  The rear sights of the Model IX-C and IX-D are adjustable; the rest have fixed rear sights.

     The Model X was built from 1935-54; despite being built on the large frame, it fired a rather weak cartridge -- .32 ACP.  It has no grip safety, but the Model X-A, built from 1954-76, did have a grip safety.  The two are identical for game purposes.

     The Model XI, also called the Llama Especial or Llama Special, was in many ways different from all the other pistols of this series.  Built on the large frame, it is the only pistol of this series to fire the 9mm Parabellum cartridge, and it differs in external form from the others.  The grip frame had a finger rest at the bottom; it used a “Commander” type loop hammer instead of a spur hammer; the grip plates were of vertically-grooved walnut of good quality wood; finally, the grip was extended to allow the use of a somewhat larger magazine.  While it had no grip safety, the Model XI-A, replacing the Model XI in 1954, did; another variant is the Model XI-B, which has a 4.25-inch barrel and a spur hammer.  Both use target-quality barrels.  The Model XI-A and Model XI-B are still being produced today, and they are regarded as some of the finest 9mm Parabellum pistols ever designed.

     The Model XII-B is built on the small frame, but uses a variant of the large frame’s action; it was introduced in 1990 and is still in production. 

     The Model XV is one of the smallest-caliber versions of this series; it fires .22 Long Rifle ammunition, and is built on a small frame.  Options for the Model XV abound, including different finishes, sights, and grip plates.  The Model XVI is a deluxe version of the Model XV, with engraving, a ventilated sighting rib atop the slide, adjustable sights, and ergonomic grips.  The Model XVII is even smaller, chambered for .22 Short ammunition; the grip has finger swells and is ergonomically designed primarily for those with smaller hands.  The Model XVIII variant is virtually the same as the Model XV, but chambered for .25 ACP.  The Model XVIII can be had blued, chromed, or even with a gold-plated finish.  All of these pistols were introduced in 1955, and are still in production.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model I/I-A

7.65mm Parabellum

0.54 kg

7

$126

Model II/III

.380 ACP

0.57 kg

7

$140

Model III-A (Early)

.380 ACP

0.59 kg

7

$140

Model III-A (Late)

.380 ACP

0.65 kg

7

$122

Model IV

9mm Largo

1.11 kg

7

$283

Model IV

.380 ACP

1 kg

7

$231

Model V

7.65mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

7

$204

Model VI

.380 ACP

0.98 kg

7

$231

Model VII

.38 Super

1.08 kg

7

$284

Model VIII/VIII-A

.38 Super

1.08 kg

7

$284

Model VIII/VIII-A

9mm Largo

1.08 kg

7

$283

Model VIII/VIII-A

.45 ACP

1.2 kg

7

$404

Model VIII-C

.38 Super

1.06 kg

18

$293

Model IX

7.65mm Parabellum

0.66 kg

7

$204

Model IX

9mm Largo

0.77 kg

7

$283

Model IX/IX-A

.45 ACP

0.85 kg

7

$407

Model IX-B

.45 ACP

0.86 kg

7

$407

Model IX-C

.45 ACP

1.16 kg

10

$409

Model IX-D

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

10

$400

Model X/X-A

.32 ACP

0.82 kg

7

$193

Model XI/XI-A

9mm Parabellum

0.96 kg

9

$251

Model XI-B

9mm Parabellum

0.94 kg

9

$243

Model XII-B

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.83 kg

7

$185

Model XV/XVI

.22 Long Rifle

0.48 kg

10

$89

Model XVII

.22 Short

0.46 kg

10

$81

Model XVIII

.25 ACP

0.51 kg

10

$97

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model I/1-A

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

Model II/III

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

Model III-A (Early)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

Model III-A (Late)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

Model IV (9mm Largo)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Model IV (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Model V

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Model VI

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Model VII

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Model VIII/VIII-A (.38)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Model VIII/VIII-A (9mm Largo)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Model VIII/VIII-A (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Model VIII-C

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Model IX (7.65mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

Model IX (9mm Largo)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

13

Model IX/IX-A/XI-B (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

14

Model IX-C

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Model IX-D

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Model X/X-A

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Model XI/XI-A

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Model XI-B

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Model XII-B

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Model XV/XVI

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

Model XVII

SA

-2

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

Model XVIII

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

 

Llama Max Series

     Notes: The Max series is essentially a modern version of the Large Frame/Small Frame series above.  One of the biggest alternations to the original weapons (at least externally), is that they have been re-shaped to look even more like the M-1911A1.  In addition, a skeleton hammer similar to that fitted to the earliest versions of the M-1911 was added to most versions, they have extended manual safeties as well as a larger beavertail grip and grip safety, and for most models, the rear sight is adjustable, with a blade front sight.  Grip plates are of black rubber, and construction is otherwise of steel.  The external metal is made of blued carbon steel or stainless steel, though they can also be had with a blued carbon steel slide and a stainless steel frame.

     The Max-I L/F is Llama’s equivalent of the full-sized M-1911A1; it has a slightly longer barrel than the M-1911A1 at 5.125 inches.  The Max-I comes primarily in .45 ACP, but is also available in 9mm Parabellum, and from 2001 onward, .40 Smith & Wesson.  There is also a Max-I Compensator version; this is a standard Max-I L/F with a three-port compensator added to the muzzle, and a rear sight which is micrometer-adjustable.  A Max-I C/F (Compact Frame) version is also made, which has a 4.25-inch barrel and a Commander-type loop hammer, but is otherwise identical to the Max-I L/F.  The Max-I L/F and C/F were introduced in 1995, but the Compensator version waited until 1996.  The C/F stopped production in 2001, but it picked up again in 2003.  All three are still being manufactured.

     1996 also brought the Mini-Max, a more compact version of the Max-I with an even shorter 3.5-inch barrel.  The shorter grip contains a smaller magazine.  Sights are fixed, the grip plates are of checkered rubber, and the front of the trigger guard is squared to allow the shooter to use the finger of his nonfiring hand to help steady the weapon.  Finish of the exterior metal is the same as the Max-I, with the addition of a satin stainless steel finish (or a duo-tone finish with the frame in satin stainless steel).  The 9mm Parabellum was not produced after 1997; the other two chamberings are still in production.  In 1999, the Mini-Max Subcompact was introduced; this model has only a 3.14-inch barrel, but uses a double-stack magazine with an astounding capacity for a weapon of its small size.  In addition, 1999 brought the Mini-Max II, which uses the Mini-Max Subcompact’s double-stack magazine, but is otherwise identical to the Mini-Max.

     In 1997, the Max series equivalent of the former small frame Llama pistols was introduced; this pistol is called the Micro-Max.  The Micro-Max fires smaller calibers than the Mini-Max, and has a 3.6-inch barrel.  The Micro-Max uses a Commander-type loop hammer, 3-dot-type fixed sights, and black polymer grip plates along with a grip having a thumbrest shaped into the bottom.  The external metal is finished blued or satin chromed.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: None of these pistols are available in .40 Smith & Wesson in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  All of these pistols are quite rare in the Twilight 2000 timeline, with the Max-I Compensated and the Mini-Max being especially rare.  The Mini-Max Subcompact and the Mini-Max II are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Max I L/F

9mm Parabellum

0.81 kg

9

$249

Max I L/F

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.91 kg

8

$322

Max I L/F

.45 ACP

1.02 kg

7

$408

Max I C/F

9mm Parabellum

0.76 kg

9

$240

Max I C/F

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.86 kg

8

$314

Max I C/F

.45 ACP

0.96 kg

7

$399

Max I Compensated

9mm Parabellum

0.95 kg

9

$299

Max I Compensated

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.07 kg

8

$373

Max I Compensated

.45 ACP

1.19 kg

7

$458

Mini-Max

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

9

$232

Mini-Max

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.88 kg

8

$306

Mini-Max

.45 ACP

0.99 kg

7

$392

Mini-Max II

.45 ACP

1 kg

10

$399

Mini-Max Subcompact

.45 ACP

0.88 kg

10

$388

Micro-Max

.32 ACP

0.6 kg

8

$121

Micro-Max

.380 ACP

0.65 kg

7

$140

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Max I L/F (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Max I L/F (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Max I L/F (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Max I C/F (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Max I C/F (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Max I C/F (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Max I Compensated (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

Max I Compensated (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Max I Compensated (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Mini-Max (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Mini-Max (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Mini-Max (.45)/Mini-Max II

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Mini-Max Subcompact

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Micro-Max (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

Micro-Max (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

 

Llama Omni Series

     Notes: The Omni was a rather interesting pistol in many ways; externally, it looked like another loose M-1911 clone, but internally, the mechanism was quite different.  The Omni was double-action, with the slide mounted on roller bearings.  This was combined with a standard Colt/Browning breech lock/link.  The steel construction was finished in blue, and the rear sight was adjustable; the front sight was a blade mounted on a low rib.  The barrel was 4.25 inches, and the trigger guard was squared-off to help the non-firing hand stabilize the pistol.  The hammer is shrouded. The Omni was produced in three versions, with the Omni I being by far the most common.  They were produced from 1982 to early 1986.

     The M-82 was a highly-modified Omni; it did away with the roller bearings and used a dropping wedge breech lock based partially on the Walther P-38 and partially on the Beretta M-92.  The barrel was also fixed into the frame.  This increased reliability of both operation and extraction/ejection.  The safety was combined with the slide lock, and was made ambidextrous.  Sights were fixed and of the 3-dot-type.  Finish was satin or bright chromed, and civilian versions could be had with a steel or alloy frame.  The M-82 was adopted by the Spanish Army in 1985, but was not sold on the commercial market until 1988; it was manufactured primarily until 1992, though a few were built to replace worn out Spanish Army M-82s after that.  The M-87 is a competition version of the M-82, built only with a steel frame and with a 6-inch barrel tipped with a combination counterweight/compensator.  The magazine release and slide lock/safety are extended and ambidextrous, and the magazine well is beveled. The rear sight is adjustable, and the frond sight is dovetailed into the slide.  The trigger is adjustable length and weight of pull.  The M-87 was introduced in 1989, and primarily built until 1992, though some were built after that by special order.  The M-87 ISU Match is a rare variant of the M-87, with no compensator/counterweight, micrometer-adjustable sights, and 10-round magazines to comply with the regulations of certain pistol matches (though they can still accept the 14-round magazines of the M-87, and vice versa).

     Twilight 2000 Notes: It was quite common for Spanish military officers to acquire M-87s in place of their M-82s in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Omni I

.45 ACP

1.13 kg

7

$399

Omni II

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

9

$240

Omni III

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

13

$242

M-82 (Steel Frame)

9mm Parabellum

1.11 kg

14

$242

M-82 (Alloy Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

14

$243

M-87

9mm Parabellum

1.24 kg

10, 14

$310

M-87 ISU Match

9mm Parabellum

1.16 kg

10, 14

$261

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Omni I

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Omni II/III

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

M-82 (Steel Frame)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

M-82 (Alloy Frame)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

M-87

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

15

M-87 ISU Match

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

Mugica Perfect

     Notes: Jose Mugicar was an Eibar-based gunsmith who, in addition to having arrangements to build and sell certain Llama designs on the civilian market (most notably the Large Frame/Small Frame series above), also built a number of pistols based on the ubiquitous “Eibar” design.  One of these was the Perfect; it was of better quality than the Eibar, but still of rather cheap quality.  The Perfect looks like what it is – a somewhat better-quality version of the Eibar, designed for small calibers.  The barrel is 4 inches, and the construction is largely of steel of fair quality.  The markings are also unusual; though most have the word “PERFECT” stamped into the bakelite grip plates, and the appropriate places have the caliber stamped on them, they may or may not carry serial numbers, and could be marked “MUGICA”, “MUGICA – EIBAR,” “MUGICA – MADE IN SPAIN,” or nothing stamped on the slide, and these markings could be on the left side, right side, or top of the slide, and not necessarily on the same place on each pistol.  The Perfect was built primarily from the mid-1920s to mid-1930s, and sold reasonably-well.  However, due to their poor construction, working and reliable versions are somewhat difficult to find today.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Perfect

.25 ACP

0.45 kg

7

$101

Perfect

.32 ACP

0.7 kg

7

$125

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Perfect (.25)

SA

-1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

Perfect (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9