ASAI onePRO

     Notes: This Swiss pistol was not introduced until 1994, yet became popular with Western European special operations forces due to its toughness and ability to digest virtually any ammunition put in it, regardless of quality (or lack of it).  The onePRO is available in .45 ACP, the unusual chambering of .400 Cor-Bon, 9mm Parabellum, or 9x21mm, and can be had with either the standard 3.8-inch barrel or a  4.5-inch barrel (in the case of the onePro 45 and 400) or a 3.1-inch barrel (in the case of the onePro 9).  The onePRO is virtually corrosion-proof, employing finishing techniques taken from the space program.  The ASAI onePro comes in alloy-framed and polymer-framed versions.  They use an unusual decocking lever mechanism which is patented and also actuates a firing pin lock when used.  Normally, the onePro is DA/SA weapon, but DAO versions are also available.  Locking is via a rotating barrel in the case of the onePro 9, or using Browning-type operation in the case of the onePro 45 and onePro 400.  Ambidextrous controls are an option.

     These pistols are also licensed for production in the Czech Republic by Caliber Prague Limited; in this guise they are known as the MTE-45, MTE-400, and MTE-9.

     Twilight 2000 Story: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

onePro 9 (Alloy Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.72 kg

10, 11, 16

$230

onePro 9 (Polymer Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.58 kg

10, 11, 16

$229

onePro 9 (Alloy Frame)

9x21mm

0.8 kg

10, 11, 16

$247

onePro 9 (Polymer Frame)

9x21mm

0.64 kg

10, 11, 16

$247

onePRO 400 (3.8” Barrel, Alloy Frame)

.400 Cor-Bon

0.93 kg

10, 15

$492

onePro 400 (4.5” Barrel, Alloy Frame)

.400 Cor-Bon

0.96 kg

10, 15

$499

onePRO 400 (3.8” Barrel, Polymer Frame)

.400 Cor-Bon

0.92 kg

10, 15

$491

onePro 400 (4.5” Barrel, Polymer Frame)

.400 Cor-Bon

0.95 kg

10, 15

$498

onePRO 45 (3.8” Barrel, Alloy Frame)

.45 ACP

0.83 kg

10, 15

$394

onePro 45 (4.5” Barrel, Alloy Frame)

.45 ACP

0.86 kg

10, 15

$401

onePRO 45 (3.8” Barrel, Polymer Frame)

.45 ACP

0.82 kg

10, 15

$393

onePro 45 (4.5” Barrel, Polymer Frame)

.45 ACP

0.85 kg

10, 15

$401

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

onePro 9 (9mm Para, Alloy/Polymer)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

onePro 9 (9x21mm, Alloy/Polymer)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

onePRO 400 (3.8”, Alloy/Polymer)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

1

3

Nil

8

onePRO 400 (4.5”, Alloy/Polymer)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

1

3

Nil

10

onePRO 45 (3.8”, Alloy/Polymer)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

onePRO 45 (4.5”, Alloy/Polymer)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

 

ASAI MTE-V

     Notes: A machine pistol designed for the NATO Personal Defense Weapon competition, this weapon was rejected early on for unknown reasons.  The MTE-V also has a variant, the MTE-VA; this weapon is identical to the MTE-V, except that the muzzle is threaded to accept a sound suppressor.  Though the weapon was rejected early as a NATO PDW, it is being aggressively marketed to police and military agencies worldwide, and apparently some sales have been made to unnamed agencies.  The MTE-V has a large magazine capacity, with an extended magazine capacity available.  The underside of the barrel has an adapter which can mount a variety of accessories, including a special handgrip ASAI has devised that is hollow and can carry an additional magazine within.  It should be noted that while the MTE-VA may be fired on automatic, this not recommended while the sound suppressor is attached, due to the damage it causes to the suppressor.  Without its suppressor, the MTE-VA is identical to the MTE-V for game purposes.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This pistol does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MTE-V

.224V

1.05 kg

16, 26

$457

MTE-VA

.224V

1.23 kg

16, 26

$492

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MTE-V

3

2

1-1-Nil

2

3

5

21

MTE-VA

3

2

1-1-Nil

2

3

4

16

 

Bugger & Thomet TP-9

     Notes: The Steyr Special Purpose Pistol (SPP) was basically a version of the Steyr TMP PDW, reworked into a rather large pistol.  This does make it a rather sturdy and reliable weapon, but in general it’s too large to attract most civilian buyers, and too limited in its applications from a police or military standpoint.  Sales have been therefore lukewarm at best. In 2004, Brugger & Thomet bought the design from Steyr, and sales have been somewhat better, especially after licensing its sales to DSA in the US.

     Like the TMP, the TP-9 uses a rotary-barrel locking system, and not the tipping-barrel system used by most pistols and many submachineguns these days.  Operation is by delayed blowback with short recoil; this method of operation does mitigate felt recoil somewhat, as does the general in-line design of the TP-9.  The TP-9 also adds a bolt hold-open feature.  The charging handle is at the rear, and though it does not look like the charging handle of an M-16, it is similar in design.  Both the upper and lower receivers are made from molded composites, reinforced where necessary by light alloy and steel.  Magazines are of high-impact plastic (and the TP-9 and TMP can also use the same magazines designed for the 9mm SMG version of the AUG).  The barrel is 5.3 inches long and tipped with a large solid flash suppressor.  The barrel itself is threaded, making the flash suppressor easy to remove and replace with a wide variety of suppressors, muzzle brakes, and silencers.  The manual safety is of the crossbolt type, and the TP-9 also uses a passive firing pin safety and a magazine safety.  The TP-9 is also able to use a wide variety of slings.  The rear sight has a wide, square notch and is adjustable for windage; the front sight is used for elevation adjustments.  (Adjusting either sight requires the use of an ordinary screwdriver – or anything that will do the same job.)  The handguard of the TP-9 is of a slightly different shape and the finger guard is more pronounced, though the design is similar. Atop the receiver there is a rail for mounting a variety of optics (though it is not a MIL-STD-1913 rail).  No provision is made on the TP-9 for a stock.  The TP-9 is easy to work on and strip, as there are only 41 total components in the weapon.  The TP-9 (and the TMP) are also known for their lack of pickiness about ammunition.

     Due to requests from customers in the US, Brugger & Thomet are developing a version of the TP-9 in .45 ACP, to be tentatively called the TP-45.  This is expected to be available by the end of 2009 or early 2010, and will be sold only through DSA in the US.  Stats below are estimates.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

TP-9

9mm Parabellum

1.29 kg

15, 20, 25, 30

$255

TP-45

.45 ACP

1.44 kg

12, 16, 20, 24

$416

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

TP-9

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

13

TP-45

SA

2

2-Nil

2

2

Nil

15

 

Hammerli X-ESSE

     Notes: This is a sporting pistol, unlike other Hammerli designs.  It has many features in common with Hammerli’s match pistols, such as a micrometer adjustable rear sight and optional anatomical grips, but it is generally designed for use as a varmint hunting weapon and for pest control.  The frame and grips are synthetic and can be had in several different colors, including yellow, blue, red, and black.  (The combination of black grips and frame and a stainless steel slide is known as the “Macho Black” pattern.)  Disassembly is said to be easy and similar to that of the Walther PP (though the weapons are not related.)

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This pistol does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

X-ESSE (4.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.8 kg

10

$131

X-ESSE (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.95 kg

10

$141

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

X-ESSE (4.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

X-ESSE (6”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

ITM AT-84S

     Notes: This Swiss-made pistol started out as a license-produced version of the Czech CZ-75 pistol, but the Swiss armorers began tinkering the design, and little by little, it turned into a separate design.  The weapon was later manufactured in the US by the Action Arms Company (see US Pistols A-I).  The whole design is greatly improved over its Czech progenitor, and the parts are no longer interchangeable.  The quality of the finish is high, and the AT-84S is a far safer design to carry and shoot.  Caliber may be changed by changing the barrel and magazine. 

     Twilight/Merc 2000 Story: As Notes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AT-84S

9mm Parabellum

0.95 kg

15

$243

AT-84S

.41 Action Express

1.15 kg

12

$335

Barrel Kit

NA

0.45 kg

NA

$90

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AT-84S (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

AT-84S (.41)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

ITM AT-2000P

     Notes: This is the compact version of the AT-84S (below).  The action is the same, but the barrel is shorter. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AT-84P

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

15

$238

AT-84P

.41 Action Express

1.11 kg

12

$329

Barrel Kit

NA

0.4 kg

NA

$80

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AT-84P (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

AT-84P (.41AE)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

P-06/29

     Notes:  This is basically a better-made, domestically-produced version of the Luger P-00.  The P-06/29 was supposed to reduce the cost to the Swiss government of the Luger, but in fact the pistol was so well made that it was more expensive than imported pistols.  Nonetheless, the Swiss decided that having a source of domestically-built pistols was better than relying on foreign sources, and they ordered the P-06/29 into production.  Some 27,900 were built before production stopped in 1947. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-06/29

7.65mm Parabellum

0.9 kg

8

$201

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-06/29

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

SiG Pro SP-2340/2009/2022

     Notes: This weapon marks SiG-Sauer's entry into the polymer-frame market. It is basically a development of the P-210, with new calibers, a polymer frame and grip, fewer parts and simpler construction, optional SA/DA or DAO operation, and a decocking lever with firing pin lock that eliminates the need for a manual safety.  It was chosen by several police departments in Western Europe and the US.  The standard SP-2009 and SP-2340 has a rail molded into the frame for a laser pointer or other accessories.

     In late 2005, the SP-2022 was introduced to the SiG Pro line.  This version has a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover, and several internal changes.  The foremost of these is a powerful extractor, similar in concept and partly similar in design to Para-Ordnance’s Power Extractor; unfortunately, the claw of this extractor that it usually puts a large dent in the empty cases, making reloading virtually impossible.  The SP-2022 comes with two interchangeable grips for its polymer frame, one for large hands, and one for small ones. 

     Twilight 2000 Story: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SP-2340

.357 SiG

0.79 kg

10, 12

$263

SP-2340

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.79 kg

10, 12

$311

SP-2009

9mm Parabellum

0.71 kg

10, 12, 15

$237

SP-2022

.357 SiG

0.86 kg

10, 12, 15

$265

SP-2022

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.92 kg

10, 12, 15

$311

SP-2022

9mm Parabellum

0.83 kg

10, 12, 15

$237

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SP-2340 (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SP-2340 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SP-2009

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

SP-2022 (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SP-2022 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SP-2022 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

SiG-Sauer 1911

     Notes: Though all based on the iconic M-1911A1, SiG-Sauer’s iteration comes in a wide variety of versions.  Most are distinguishable from other SiG-Sauer 1911s by their finishes, which include Nitron (frame and slide) with checkered wood grips, a version of the Nitron with a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover, a version with a stainless steel finish for the slide and frame with black checkered hard rubber grips (and a version with a rail under the duct cover), one with an XO Black finish, one called the TTT with a black slide and a bead-blasted stainless steel frame, the STX with smooth wooden grips and a TTT finish, and the Platinum Elite with a Nitron frame, a matte stainless steel slide, matte stainless steel controls, and textured aluminum grip plates with a matte stainless steel finish (the Platinum Elite also has an adjustable rear night combat sight).  Even under the finishes, the SiG-Sauer 1911 uses a stainless steel frame and slide, and they are machined to exacting tolerances and have hand-fitted parts.  Most interior parts are match quality, as is the barrel and hammer/sear.  The rear sight is a Novak low-profile night sight, and the front sight is a low-profile blade with a tritium insert.  Frontstraps and backstraps are checkered, 25 lpi on the front and 20 lpi on the back.  The frame and slide are dehorned as much as possible, including lower-profile slide locks, and loop hammers; however, the manual safety is extended.  The grip safety has a bump to ensure positive engagement. It is essentially an M-1911A1 built better.

     Those are the “base” versions.  The 1911 Target Stainless’s barrel is a bit above match-quality, and the other match-quality parts help in this.  It has a matte stainless steel finish, custom black wood grips, adjustable target rear sights, and a dovetailed squared front sight blade.  The Target Nitron is identical, but has a Nitron finish, and uses custom walnut grips.  The Carry Nitron and Carry Stainless use the same frame, but a commander-length 4.25” barrel.  The RCS Nitron, RCS Stainless, and RCS Two-Tone are similar commander-length 1911s, but are further dehorned with less snaggable corners and projections on them.  The frames of these three are also a little shorter in the grip.  Weight has been decreased radically through the use of this shorter grip and by the use of lighter yet stronger steel as well as an alloy frame. The RCS Nitron is basically a further dehorned Carry Nitron, while the RCS Two-Tone has a Nitron-finished frame and a stainless steel slide, trigger, and hammer. Grips are gray diamondwood on the RCS Stainless, Rosewood on the Nitron, and either/or on the RCS Two-Tone.  The C3 is also similar in design for the most part, and has a two-tone finish like the RCS Two-Tone model; however, the manual safety button, slide lock, and beavertail are of stainless steel, while the front and rear sights are dovetailed in and are of a contrasting black finish.  The internal parts, trigger pack, and hammer are match quality, while the barrel is of heavy profile and match quality.  The grip plates are of rosewood with a custom cut design in them; the screws holding them on are finished in stainless steel.

     Further specializations of the SiG-Sauer 1911 are available. The Tactical Operations has a matte black Nitron finish (except for the trigger, hammer, and muzzle crown, which are bright metal).  Tolerances are tightened even further in the Tactical Operations. Though not as dehorned as the Carry or RCS or C3, the Tactical Operations is more dehorned than the base SiG-Sauer 1911.  The trigger pack has been tweaked to slightly ease the trigger pull weight and make the trigger pull a bit more crisp.  Ergonomics have been somewhat improved, including stippled rubber grip plates (also black), while retaining the checkered frontstrap and backstrap (though both are tightened to 25 lpi). The Tactical Operations uses Novak low-profile night combat sights (both of which are dovetailed in).  The safety/slide lock of the Tactical Operations is ambidextrous, and the magazine well is funneled to aid in quick reloading.  The bottom of the magazine well/grip has been modified to make the shooter’s grip on the weapon surer.  (The entire grip modifications, including the stippled rubber side plates, is called the Ergo XT grip.) Below the dust cover is a short MIL-STD-1913 rail. The 5-inch barrel is of medium weight and match quality, and grants a little more accuracy than the basic SiG-Sauer 1911; the Tactical Operations’s barrel also comes in a threaded-barrel version, and stats are provided below for use of the Tactical Operations with a silencer.  Though meant primarily for police and military use, the Tactical Operations makes a quite able competition pistol.  The Tactical Operations TB is the same pistol, but with a longer 5.5-inch barrel.

     The 1911R Scorpion is essentially a base SiG-Sauer 1911 with a rail under the dust cover for game purposes, but has a few interesting wrinkles.  The Scorpion has been designed to operate more reliably in dusty environments, and is finished in Desert Tan Cerekote.  The grip plates have been given a “snake skin/stippled” treatment, called the Hogue Piranha treatment.  The slide lock, manual safety, hammer, dovetailed front and rear sight units, and the grip safety are finished in matte black. The trigger and muzzle crown are in bright metal. The Scorpion uses a grip/magazine well design called the Hogue Magwell Grip Set.  The grip plates, mainspring housing, and funneled lower magazine well are combined into an integrated unit, and the magazines snap in place at the top and the bottom.  This makes for sure magazine insertion and removal.  Under the dust cover is a rail for attachments.

     Though the Scorpion is essentially an M-1911 under the hood except for the differences above, there are several versions of the Scorpion. The Carry Scorpion is a compact-sized pistol with a 4.2-inch barrel, though the magazine size remains at 8 rounds.  The sights are low-profile SiGLite night sights.  The Carry Scorpion can fit in any holster designed for the P-220 as well as M-1911 compact holsters.  (The full-sized Scorpions can use any 1911 holster.) The Carry Scorpion TB is similar, but the barrel is extended and threaded for use with a suppressor.  The Scorpion TB is also similar, but is a full-sized version with a 5-inch barrel extended with threads for the attachment of a suppressor. The 1911 Scorpion is the same weapon, but with no extended barrel.  It should be noted that none of the Scorpions have a guide rod, but do have higher-quality barrels than most of the SiG 1911 line.

     The 1911-22 is meant not only for plinking and pest control, it is meant to be a training counterpart to the rest of the SiG-Sauer 1911 line.  The 1911-22 uses a light alloy slide and frame, but otherwise has the same features and is built to the same dimensions as the standard 1911.  All controls and safeties work identically to the standard 1911.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These pistols do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

1911 (Base)

.45 ACP

1.06 kg

8

$408

1911 (Base, w/Rail)

.45 ACP

1.07 kg

8

$413

1911 Target Stainless

.45 ACP

1.06 kg

8

$409

1911 Carry

.45 ACP

0.98 kg

8

$400

1911 RCS

.45 ACP

0.73 kg

7

$403

1911 C3

.45 ACP

0.73 kg

7

$404

1911 Tactical Operations

.45 ACP

1.08 kg

8

$414

1911 Tactical Operations TB

.45 ACP

1.09 kg

8

$419

Silencer for 1911 Tactical Operations

N/A

0.88 kg

N/A

$175

1911-22

.22 Long Rifle

0.51 kg

10

$131

1911 Carry Scorpion

.45 ACP

1 kg

8

$403

1911 Carry Scorpion TB

.45 ACP

1.04 kg

8

$404

1911 Scorpion

.45 ACP

1.18 kg

8

$413

1911 Scorpion TB

.45 ACP

1.21 kg

8

$414

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

1911 (Base)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

1911 Target Stainless

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

15

1911 Carry

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

1911 RCS/C3

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

1911 C3

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

1911 Tactical Operations

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

15

1911 Tactical Operations (Silenced)

SA

2

Nil

3

2

Nil

10

1911 Tactical Operations TB

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

16

1911 Tactical Operations TB (Silenced)

SA

2

Nil

3

2

Nil

12

1911-22

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

1911 Carry Scorpion

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

1911 Carry Scorpion TB

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

1911 Scorpion

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

1911 Scorpion TB

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

SiG-Sauer Mosquito

     Notes: This rimfire pistol is basically a smaller version of the P-226.  It is still about 90% the size of the P-226, but fires the .22 Long Rifle round.  The Mosquito uses a polymer frame with an integral MIL-STD-1913 rail under the barrel for the attachment of accessories.  The grip plates are of composite material.  The slide, barrel, and working parts are of steel, with the slide being blued along with the exterior of the barrel and exposed part of the chamber.  The rear sight is adjustable.  The Mosquito has an automatic drop safety, a manual decocking lever, a magazine safety, and an internal lock that is actuated by inserting a key and totally locks the action.  The Mosquito is a double-action weapon.  Despite the resemblance to the P-226, the Mosquito was not intended to be a practice pistol for the P-226, but is instead meant for recreational shooting and light self-defense.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Mosquito was not introduced until 2005 and is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mosquito

.22 Long Rifle

0.7 kg

10

$119

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mosquito

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

 

SiG-Sauer P-210

     Notes: This is an updated version of the World War 2 era Model 44 series, and has also been known through the years as the Model 47/48, Model 48, Model 49, and the Neuhausen.  “P-210” is the pistol’s factory/civilian designation. It was the standard service pistol of the Swiss police and military forces for decades, being replaced by the P-220 and later SiG-Sauer designs in the late 1980s, and many P-210’s can still be found today.  In addition, the P-210 was very popular with worldwide police forces and with civilians during its production run, and thus examples of it can be found around the globe.  The P-210 is a reliable and robust weapon that can be fire three calibers by simply changing the barrel, recoil spring, slide, and magazine.

     The P-210 is considered an “Improved Browning” design, but has several departures from Browning pistols of the period.  The most obvious is the action: like the Tokarev TT-33 and most pistols made by Radom, the P-210’s action is contained in a single modular package and can be removed and replaced as one piece. The trigger pack is also a single modular pack.  This means that P-210s are very easy to update as new developments come along that may benefit the weapon, repairs can be made quickly even if the pistol’s action or trigger pack are fatally damaged, and the P-210 can be kept “fresh,” in a marketing sense.

     The P-210-1 version is the standard model with wood grip plates; production stopped in 1994.  The P-210-2 is the military version with a matte finish and plastic grip plates.  The P-210-3 is basically a P-210-1 with a chamber loaded indicator.  The P-210-4 is a P-210-2 manufactured for the West German Border Guards, but otherwise identical; production stopped in 1994.  Another version, the P-210-5, is a target pistol with a 6-inch or 7-inch extended barrel.  The P-210-6 is also a target version, but built to more exacting standards; it has a micrometer adjustable rear sight, and either a 4.75” or 6” match barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-210

9mm Parabellum

0.9 kg

8

$246

P-210

7.65mm Parabellum

0.9 kg

8

$201

P-210

.22 Long Rifle

0.85 kg

8

$127

P-210-5 (6” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.96 kg

8

$257

P-210-5 (7” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.99 kg

8

$269

P-210-6 (4.75” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

8

$247

P-210-6 (6” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.97 kg

8

$260

P-210-6 (4.75” Barrel)

7.65mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

8

$204

P-210-6 (6” Barrel)

7.65mm Parabellum

0.97 kg

8

$216

P-210 Conversion Kit

NA

0.9 kg

NA

$180

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-210 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P-210 (7.65mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P-210 (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

P-210-5 (6”, 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

15

P-210-5 (7”, 9mm)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

18

P-210-6 (4.75”, 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P-210-6 (6”, 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

16

P-210-6 (4.75”, 7.65mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P-210-6 (6”, 7.65mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

SiG-Sauer P-220

     Notes: The P-220 was designed as a mechanically simpler alternative to the P-210.  In development since the late 1960s, the P-220 was introduced in 1974, and almost immediately was adopted by the Swiss Army as the P-75.  The P-220 were built in 4 calibers, but the 7.65mm Parabellum chambering was discontinued in 1992, and the 9mm Parabellum chambering in 2001.  The .38 Super chambering was always limited-production, and production was discontinued in 2003.  The .45 ACP version (designed specifically for the US market, and at first marketed as the P-220 All-American) remains in production.  A kit to convert the P-220 to fire .22 Long Rifle ammunition is also available (from several companies, including SiGArms). 

     The main design simplification of the P-220 is in the locking and unlocking system – the cam system for lowering and raising the tilting barrel is almost identical to that of the P-210, but the chamber is essentially a single squared block that rises into the ejection port for extraction.  The P-220 also uses a combination decocker/safety similar to that of the Sauer Model 38H.  The P-220 can be fired in single or double action mode, and it uses a modified Browning action with numerous internal safeties.  The barrel is 4.41 inches, making the P-220 a mid-size pistol, and uses a light alloy frame combined with other parts that are primarily of steel.  The P-220 is available with a wide variety of finishes and grip plate materials.  .45 ACP and .38 Super models, since they were meant for the US market, have their controls placed a bit differently – especially the magazine release, which is a button behind the trigger guard instead of a catch on the heel of the butt. Sights are normally high-contrast three-dot types, but tritium inlays for the sights are an option.  In addition, magazines are available with an extension of hard rubber shaped to improve the user’s grip on the pistol. (The .45 ACP models will also accept any magazine that can be used with an M-1911A1.)

     A number of specialized versions of the P-220 have also been made.  The P-220ST (Stainless Tactical) has a stainless steel frame and slide, Hogue wrap-around rubber grips, and is equipped with a tactical rail under the dust cover. (The P-220ST is normally sold in an aluminum case with a padded interior, two magazines, and a SiGArms Tactical Knife, but these are not included in the price below.)  The P-220 Sport has a frame and slide of stainless steel, and has a match-quality 5.5-inch barrel tipped with a stainless steel compensator and a counterweight.  (A less common version of the P-220 Sport uses a 4.75-inch barrel, but does not have the muzzle counterweights.)  The limited-edition P-220 Langdon Edition has a match-quality 4.41-inch barrel, checkered high-quality wood grip plates, a checkered frontstrap, an adjustable rear sight and a front sight with a fiberoptic inlay, a trigger with a shorter pull length and lighter pull weight, a slightly larger magazine capacity, a tactical accessory rail under the dust cover, and a two-tone finish featuring a blued slide.

     The then-West German police were not one of the agencies that wanted the P-220; in their minds, the P-220 was simply too big a pistol for their needs.  In addition, the Swiss police had a similar opinion.  To satisfy the requirements of the West German and Swiss police, SiG scaled down the 9mm Parabellum version of the P-220, producing the P-225 in 1975.  Mechanically, the P-225 is almost identical to the P-220, but the P-225 relies almost entirely on its double-action operation for safety features.  The dual DA/SA operation was dispensed with for the P-225, though the passive firing pin safety was also improved.  There is no manual safety on the P-225, though the decocker was retained.  The barrel is shortened to near compact dimensions (3.86 inches), the grip reshaped somewhat, and the entire design more balanced.  The standard sights are the same as those of the P-220, but they are dovetailed in and replaceable.  Most parts of the P-225 can be interchanged with those of the P-220, and many can also be used in other SiGArms 9mm Parabellum pistols.  The German military also uses the P-225 in small numbers, and the German Police call it the P-6.  That said, the P-225 is no longer in production, having been superseded by later SiGArms pistols.

     The newest iteration of the P-220 is the P-220 Super Match, which, as the name suggests, is designed for IPSC Competition as well as some other competitions.  The Super Match uses a match-quality cold-hammer-forged 5” barrel and has its front and rear sights spaced as much as possible on the slide to lengthen sight relief and increase accuracy.  The rear sight is micrometer adjustable and match-quality; the front sight is also match-quality (though not adjustable). Instead of the DA/SA trigger action found on other P-220s, the Super Match uses straight single action.  The slide/barrel combination are also engineered to contribute to muzzle control, as does the slide’s long-track recoil.  The grip safety is an extended beavertail, which also protects from the hammer bite that would otherwise be caused by the long-track slide. The grip is designed for natural pointing qualities and to guide the hand almost automatically to the correct firing position.  The Super Match has a two-tone finish, with a black hard anodized aluminum frame and a matte stainless steel slide. Grips are of hardwood, properly checkered and shaped for a sure grip.  There is no frontstrap or backstrap checkering, and the wood is a wrap-around grip.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Super Match is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-220

.22 Long Rifle

0.62 kg

10

$124

P-220

7.65mm Parabellum

0.77 kg

9

$199

P-220

9mm Parabellum

0.75 kg

9

$243

P-220

.38 Super

0.75 kg

9

$279

P-220

.45 ACP

0.73 kg

7

$403

P-220ST

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

7

$406

P-220 Sport (4.75” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.2 kg

7

$436

P-220 Sport (5.5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.25 kg

7

$443

P-220 Langdon Edition

.45 ACP

1.16 kg

7, 8

$407

P-225

9mm Parabellum

0.74 kg

8

$237

P-220 Super Match

,45 ACP

0.95 kg

8. 10

$487

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-220 (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

P-220 (7.65mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-220 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P-220 (.38 Super)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P-220 (.45 ACP)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

P-220ST

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P-220 Sport (4.75”)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

P-220 Sport (5.5”)

SA

2

2-Nil

2

2

Nil

16

P-220 Langdon Edition

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

P-225

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-220 Super Match

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

SiG-Sauer P-226

     Notes: The P-226 is a highly-modified version of the P-225, designed specifically for the US XM-9 competition.  The P-226 lost that competition in a very controversial decision – there was widespread agreement among the all branches of the US military that the P-226 was the superior pistol, and SiGArms’s bid per pistol was in fact slightly lower than Beretta’s bid per M-92 pistol.  The problem, according to the bean-counters in the Pentagon and Congress, came down to the cost of spare parts, magazines, and periodic manufacturer maintenance; Beretta’s bid for these items was much lower than SiGArms’s bid.  Therefore (once again), US troops were bitten by the old military adage, “your weapon was made by the lowest bidder.”  (The P-226 did gain acceptance with several US government agencies, however.)

     Despite having lost the XM-9 competition, many police, military, and government agencies around the world had been watching the XM-9 competition, and also knew the P-226 was superior to the Beretta M-92; in fact, a lot of these agencies and military units were in the US.  SiGArms had enjoyed lots of sales to police departments around the world, as well as some government agencies in various countries; the P-226 is also quite popular on the civilian market.  The P-226 is one of the service pistols used by the FBI, Secret Service, ATF, and the US Marshal’s Service; reportedly, the CIA has also acquired an unknown number of P-226’s.  The British and the Australian SAS are known users of the P-226, along with New Zealand’s Army and Navy, the Japanese Self-Defense Forces, the French GIGN, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The P-226 is also said to be popular with many other special operations units in the world.  Since Swiss law can be extremely restrictive with regard to the export of firearms (particularly for the civilian market), many P-226s (and other SiGArms weapons) are exported through the German company of JP Sauer & Sohn.  More recently, SiGArms has also been able to avoid Swiss export laws by manufacturing many of its weapons in its facility located in Exeter, New Hampshire in the US.

     The basic P-226 is mechanically almost identical to the 9mm Parabellum version of the P-225.  Differences include a reversible magazine release and a slightly wider grip to allow the use of a double-column magazine that nearly doubled the magazine capacity compared to the P-225.  (Extended magazines are also available.)  Barrel length remains at 4.41 inches, though the composition of the steel in the P-226’s barrel makes the barrel somewhat stronger than that of the P-225.  Early versions of the P-226 had problems accepting some aftermarket grip plates; these problems were quickly traced to the screws that came with some of these aftermarket grip panels, which put undue pressure on the magazine housing and/or firing mechanism, and SiG quickly corrected this problem.  Regardless of the caliber or intended market, the magazine release is found on the frame behind the trigger guard instead of the heel.  The sights are derived from the P-225, though they have a more high-contrast design; tritium inlays are also an option.  Originally, a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover was also an option (with those versions being designated the P-226R); since 2003, the rail has been a standard P-226 feature and the P-226R designation is no longer used.  Factory-installed Crimson Trace Lasergrips have been an option since 2004 (this version of the P-226 is called the P-226 Crimson Trace).  Original production P-226s used standard double-action lockwork, but the P-226 is now available in both DA and DAO versions.  The P-226 was first offered only in 9mm Parabellum, but .357 SiG and .40 Smith & Wesson chamberings were later added in 1996.  The basic P-226 models may be had with alloy or steel frames.

     The US Navy SEALs are notable users of the P-226; the SEALs (particularly what was then called SEAL Team Six, and now called DEVGRU) became disenchanted with the M-9 almost immediately.  Like most special operations units, the SEALs conduct large amounts of live-fire training, and in the space of six months after they were issued the M-9, three slide fractures occurred in training (not simply cracks, but actual breakage of the slides into pieces), resulting in serious injuries to the shooters (two requiring facial stitches, and one that required facial stitches and considerable dental work).  In the same time period, Army special operations units were reporting repeated slide cracking and fracturing as well.  The SEALs were not about to send their operators into combat with a pistol that might blow up in their faces, and they insisted that their M-9s be replaced by P-226s.  The P-226s used by the SEALs had slight modifications – special aftermarket ergonomic grips, a phosphate-based corrosion-resistant coating on the exterior and internal parts, high-contrast sights with tritium inlays, and a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover.  They are identical to the 9mm P-226R for game purposes.

     Out of the SEAL variant of the P-226 grew what would become the Mk 25.  Though the Navy and some other US military units have been using the Mk 25 for some 25 years, it has only since late last year that the US military has given SiG the OK to offer it to civilians. The Mk 25 has SIGLITE 3-dot night sights and a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover.  (SiG first put a proprietary rail on early Mk 25s, but outcry from the users and supply personnel got them to change to MIL-STD-1913 rails, as well as send out retrofit kits.)The grip is highly ergonomic, as are the controls, some of which are also ambidextrous. Slides are machined from stainless steel, and have an external extractor.  Finish for the aluminum frame is black Nitron, and the slide in black phosphate.  Most internal parts are nickel-plated or phosphate-finished, and are largely carbon steel.  The barrel and firing pin are made from stainless steel. The Mk 25 is now manufactured in SiG-USA’s plant in Exeter, New Hampshire.

     Variants include two sporting versions of the P-226, both in 9mm Parabellum.  The P-226 Sport II (The P-220 Sport is considered the “Sport I”) appeared in 1998 and has an alloy frame and a stainless steel slide.  The P-226 Sport II uses a stainless steel bull barrel with lengths of 4.41, 4.96, and 5.47 inches (though the 4.96-inch barrel version was discontinued in 1999), and adjustable target sights.  In 1999, the P-226 Sport II SL was introduced.  The original P-226 Sport II SL uses a stainless steel slide and frame, a 4.41-inch bull barrel, adjustable target sights, extended controls, and a barrel weight under the muzzle similar to that of the P-220 Sport.  Many shooters disliked the barrel weight, which prompted SiGArms to make a P-226 Sport II SL version without the barrel weight.  In 2002, a version with a 5.47-inch barrel was introduced (both with and without barrel weights); Aristocrat long-range target sights were also made an option at this time.

     The P-226R DAK is a fairly-new redesign of the P-226 pistol to incorporate new features and some other calibers.  The most obvious redesign is the trigger mechanism; the P-226 retains its DAO (Double-Action Only) configuration, but the trigger pull is greatly lightened to allow quicker first shots and follow-up shots.  It also allows for a smoother trigger pull when aiming, especially when a careful aim is important.  SiG did this primarily by adding leverage to the trigger system.  An additional refinement was the addition of an accessory rail under the barrel (it’s short, considering the size of the pistol, but it is useful for some light accessories).  Improvements in reliability and extraction has also been made.  The DAK series was first seen at the Trexpo-East Law Enforcement Exposition in August of 2003, but the first large-scale orders were not made until a year later, when the US Department of Homeland Security chose the DAK series (as well as the P-239) as its standard sidearm, placing an order for nearly 65,000 pistols.  (For game purposes, the P-226R DAK shoots the same as a standard P-226.)

     Introduced in 2005, the P-226 X-Five is a P-226 redesigned as a competition pistol.  The first noticeable modification is the weight; the frame is of stainless steel instead of light alloy, to increase weight and therefore reduce recoil and barrel climb.  The magazines are high-capacity, larger than those of the P-226.  The magazine well is large and beveled to facilitate quick reloading, and the magazines have a base extension which ensures proper seating of the magazine.  The magazine release is extended and grooved; there are some complaints that it is too sensitive and positioned in such a manner (directly behind the trigger on the left side) so that it can release a magazine by accident.  The barrel is lengthened to 5 inches and is of match-quality.  The grip is designed to virtually force a high grip, which is best for accurate pistol shooting and is more comfortable for prolonged shooting matches; the grip plates are of specially-shaped high-quality Nill wood.  The trigger guard is squared off for those who like to put a finger of the off-hand there.  The rear sight is, of course, fully adjustable; the front sight is an undercut post, but has none of the “sighting dots” that other pistols have, though it is black in color.  It is also dovetailed.  The trigger is also fully adjustable, with a very light pull.  The slide has front cocking serrations added to it.  The P-226 X-Five Competition is a variant that was designed specifically for IPSC competition; it does not come in a .357 SiG chambering.  The barrel of the P-226 X-Five Competition is also 5-inches long and match-quality, but it is also cold hammer-forged; the trigger action is single-action instead of double-action, which made a manual safety button (on the frame behind the trigger guard) necessary.  The grips are of black polymer and have a more ergonomic shape than those of the standard P-226 X-Five.  The P-226 X-Five Tactical is available only in 9mm Parabellum; the 5-inch barrel is also match-quality.  Under the dust cover is a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The trigger action of the P-226 X-Five Tactical is also single-action, but the manual safety is ambidextrous.  Sights are of the 3-dot type and are high-contrast.  The grips are polymer and stippled to allow the shooter a better hold on his weapon.  The finish is of black Ilaflon.  Standard magazines for the P-226 X-Five Tactical are of different capacities, but other 9mm Parabellum P-226 series magazines are also useable.

     The P-226 Tactical is an updated version of the 9mm Parabellum P-226 model that was submitted to the US military’s XM-9 competition.  Changes include a 4.41-inch barrel with the muzzle protruding from the end of the slide and having threading for the attachment of a silencer.  Under the dust cover is a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The sights used are special low-light combat sights called SiGLight Night Sights.  Balance is improved, the grip has a bit of a more ergonomic shape, and the grip plates, frontstrap, and backstrap are stippled.  The finish is black Nitron.  The P-226 SCT is similar, but is chambered for 9mm Parabellum and .40 Smith & Wesson, and the front sight is a Truglo TFO and the rear is a SiGLight Night sight.  The P-226 SCT’s barrel does not protrude from the slide and is not threaded, and the weapon is designed for SiG’s newest high-capacity magazines with a finger extension at the bottom of the magazine. (Other P-226-compatible magazines of the appropriate caliber are also useable.)  For game purposes, the P-226 Tactical and P-226 SCT shoot the same as a standard P-226 of the appropriate caliber.

     The new P-226 TACOPS (TACtical OPerationS) features a much larger beavertail, allowing for better balancing of the pistol in one’s hand, and also making the P-226 more friendly to smaller hands.  The redesigned magazine well allows for a larger magazine while still allowing the P-226 TACOPS to sit better in a smaller hand despite the use of large-capacity magazines.   The P-226 TACOPS has front cocking serrations, a black hard-anodized aluminum frame, a stainless steel slide (also finished in matte black), fiberoptic inlays for the front and rear sight as well as tritium dots inlays, the SRT (Short Reset Trigger), and a threaded muzzle to allow the mounting of a suppressor (though the threading is under the end of the slide, allowing SiG to keep the barrel length down and not have to extend the barrel). Under the dust cover is a MIL-STD-1913 rail.

     Other versions of the P-226 differ other versions of the P-226 primarily in the materials used (and all use only steel in their metalwork), sights, finishes, chamberings available, and other relatively minor details.  For game purposes, the Two-Tone, Elite Two-Tone, and Elite Stainless are identical to the late-production P-226s.  The Equinox identical to the late-production P-226 for game purposes, except that it is chambered only for .40 Smith & Wesson; the Navy is also identical except that it is chambered only for 9mm Parabellum.  The P-226 E2 has improved ergonomics, with a reduced-circumference grip, reduced-reach Short Reset trigger, snap-on grip size units, and grips with an improved-grip texture.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The following models of the P-226 do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline: P-226 Crimson Trace, P-226 Sport II SL, P-226 DAK, P-226 X-Five, P-226 E2, and the P-226 SCT.  In addition, MIL-STD-1913 rails are only found on the base P-226s whose owners had them installed as an option or aftermarket accessory.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-226 (Steel Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

10, 15

$242

P-226 (Alloy Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

10, 15

$243

P-226 (Steel Frame)

.357 SiG

0.9 kg

10, 12

$269

P-226 (Alloy Frame)

.357 SiG

0.83 kg

10, 12

$271

P-226 (Steel Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.99 kg

10, 12

$315

P-226 (Alloy Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.91 kg

10, 12

$317

P-226R (Steel Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.87 kg

10, 15

$245

P-226R (Alloy Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.8 kg

10, 15

$246

P-226R (Steel Frame)

.357 SiG

0.91 kg

10, 12

$272

P-226R (Alloy Frame)

.357 SiG

0.84 kg

10, 12

$274

P-226R (Steel Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

1 kg

10, 12

$319

P-226R (Alloy Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.92 kg

10, 12

$321

Mk 25

9mm Parabellum

0.98 kg

10, 15

$246

P-226 Crimson Trace

9mm Parabellum

0.89 kg

10, 15

$645

P-226 Crimson Trace

.357 SiG

0.93 kg

10, 12

$672

P-226 Crimson Trace

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.03 kg

10, 12

$719

P-226 Sport II (4.41” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.73 kg

10, 15

$247

P-226 Sport II (4.96” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.74 kg

10, 15

$252

P-226 Sport II (5.47” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.75 kg

10, 15

$258

P-226 Sport II SL (4.41” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

1.2 kg

10, 15

$246

P-226 Sport II SL (4.96” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

1.22 kg

10, 15

$252

P-226 Sport II SL (5.47” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

1.24 kg

10, 15

$257

P-226 Sport II SL (4.41” Barrel, with Weights)

9mm Parabellum

1.25 kg

10, 15

$247

P-226 Sport II SL (4.96” Barrel, with Weights)

9mm Parabellum

1.27 kg

10, 15

$253

P-226 Sport II SL (5.47” Barrel, with Weights)

9mm Parabellum

1.29 kg

10, 15

$258

P-226R DAK

9mm Parabellum

0.8 kg

10, 15

$246

P-226R DAK

.357 SiG

0.87 kg

10, 12

$273

P-226R DAK

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.87 kg

10, 12

$320

P-226 X-Five

9mm Parabellum

1.22 kg

10, 15, 19

$252

P-226 X-Five

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.28 kg

10, 12, 14

$327

P-226 X-Five Competition

9mm Parabellum

1.21 kg

10, 15, 19

$253

P-226 X-Five Competition

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.27 kg

10, 12, 14

$328

P-226 X-Five Tactical

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

10, 15, 20

$252

P-226 Tactical

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

10, 15

$246

P-226 SCT

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

10, 15, 20

$246

P-226 SCT

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.99 kg

10, 12, 14, 15

$320

P-226 TACOPS

9mm Parabellum

0.96 kg

10, 15, 20

$246

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-226/P-226R (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P-226/P-226R (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P-226/P-226R (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Mk 25

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

P-226 Sport II (4.41”)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P-226 Sport II (4.96”)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

P-226 Sport II (5.47”)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

P-226 Sport II SL (4.41”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

P-226 Sport II SL (4.96”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

P-226 Sport II SL (5.47”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

P-226 X-Five (Both, 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

P-226 X-Five (Both, .40)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

16

P-226 X-Five Tactical

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

P-226 TACOPS

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

SiG-Sauer P-228/229/239

     Notes: The P-228 was designed in response to requests from users worldwide; they liked the reliability and strength of the P-226, but the P-226 was too large to easily conceal or for plainclothes carry.  Users include police agencies worldwide, and civilians have also taken quickly to the P-228 as a self-defense weapon for concealed carry.  Military use is rare, but the US has type-standardized the 9mm Parabellum version of the P-228 as the M-11; it is in use by the criminal investigation divisions of the Army, Navy, and Air Force (CID, NCIS, and OSI respectively, and is also standard issue to US Air Force pilots and Coast Guard personnel.  In addition, many FBI agents carry the P-229 in its .40 Smith & Wesson chambering.

     The P-228 is mechanically almost identical to the P-226, except for the changes necessary for the smaller dimensions.  Barrel length is reduced to 3.86 inches, though the butt is only a little shorter, and the P-228 still has a large-capacity magazine.  The P-228 can also use 15-round 9mm Parabellum P-226 magazines, though they project below the grip.  The frame is of light alloy, and the slide is of stamped carbon steel.  The P-228’s trigger guard is curved instead of being squared off like that of the P-226. 

     Though parts for the P-228 are still manufactured in SiGArms’s US facility, the P-228 has been superseded in production by the P-229.  The P-229 is basically the same as the P-228, except for some changes in the slide contours (a flatter top) and having the sights dovetailed in.  .40 Smith & Wesson is considered standard for the P-229, but the 9mm Parabellum or .357 SiG caliber is just as common.  .40 Smith & Wesson versions and .357 SiG versions may be converted to one another simply by changing the barrel.  The P-229 uses an alloy frame, but the slide is milled from a one-piece solid steel billet for greater strength. 

     Chambered only in .357 SiG, the P-229 Sport uses a 4.8-inch match-quality barrel tipped with a muzzle compensator.  The slide and frame are of stainless steel, and the rear sight is micrometer adjustable, with the front and rear sight being dovetailed in.

     The P-229R DAK is the P-229 counterpart to the P-226R DAK, above.  The same sorts of improvements were made to the P-229 series to produce the P-229R DAK.  The P-229 SAS (SiG Anti-Snag) is a dehorned version of the P-229R DAK (sharp and projecting surfaces removed as much as possible), with some other improvements, such as a beveled magazine well, low-profile sights, a front sight with a tritium inlay, a grooved trigger, a slightly longer barrel, and wrap-around, extended wooden grips.  All versions of the P-229R DAK are identical for game purposes, except for some minor weight differences; also for game purposes, they shoot the same as standard P-229s.

     SiG-Sauer makes a rimfire conversion kit for the P-229, allowing it to fire .22 ammunition.  It consists of a new slide, barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide.  They also sell the P-229 in a base .22 form, which can be converted to centerfire ammunition with appropriate conversion kits.  Barrel length is 4.56 inches.

     The P-239 is essentially a version of the P-229 designed for smaller hands and for those who need a slimmer pistol; the barrel length is the same, but the grip is narrower, holding a single-stack magazine.  Initially intended only to be built in a .357 SiG model, other chamberings were quickly added due to market demand.  Despite the smaller weight and size, the P-239 shoots the same as the P-229 for game purposes.

     The P-229 E2 has improved ergonomics, with a reduced-circumference grip, reduced-reach Short Reset trigger, snap-on grip size units, and grips with an improved-grip texture.

     The P-229 Scorpion, introduced in 2011, is a version of the P-229 which is built with most of the same styling as the 1911R Scorpion; it has a light rail under the dust cover has been designed to operate more reliably in dusty environments. It is finished in Desert Tan Cerekote.  The grip plates have been given a “snake skin/stippled” treatment, called the Hogue Piranha treatment.  The slide lock, manual safety, hammer, dovetailed front and rear sight units, and the grip safety are finished in matte black. The trigger and muzzle crown are in bright metal. The Scorpion uses a grip/magazine well design called the Hogue Magwell Grip Set.  The grip plates, mainspring housing, and funneled lower magazine well are combined into an integrated unit, and the magazines snap in place at the top and the bottom.  This makes for sure magazine insertion and removal.  Under the dust cover is a rail for attachments.  Sights are SiGLite Night Sights.  The barrel length is shorter than its 1911 cousin at 3.9 inches, though it still falls into the Compact category.  Like the 1911R Scorpion, the P-229 Scorpion uses a barrel of better quality than other P-229s, though this does not always translate into game terms. The Scorpion uses SiG’s Short Reset Trigger; this is because the P-229 Scorpion is a DAO pistol, while the 1911 Scorpion is a single-action pistol.  It also has more external safety features, including two slide locks (one manual, one passive/manual), and a standard push-button manual safety.  The styling is like the 1911, though internally the P-229 Scorpion is still a P-229. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P-229R DAK, P-229 E2, Scorpion, and P-229 SAS do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  The P-239 is a very rare weapon.

     Merc 2000 Notes: All these pistols do exist in the Merc 2000 timeline, but none are built in the US.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-228

9mm Parabellum

0.83 kg

13

$237

P-229

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

13

$237

P-229

.357 SiG

0.91 kg

12

$265

P-229

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.96 kg

12

$312

P-229

.22 Long Rifle

0.71 kg

10

$125

P-229 Sport

.357 SiG

1.24 kg

12

$326

P-229R DAK

9mm Parabellum

0.8 kg

10, 13

$240

P-229R DAK

.357 SiG

0.84 kg

10, 12

$268

P-229R DAK

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.84 kg

10, 12

$315

P-229 SAS

9mm Parabellum

0.87 kg

10, 13

$240

P-229 SAS

.357 SiG

0.91 kg

10, 12

$268

P-229 SAS

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.91 kg

10, 12

$315

P-239

9mm Parabellum

0.78 kg

8, 10

$231

P-239

.357 SiG

0.82 kg

7, 10

$261

P-239

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.82 kg

6, 10

$308

P-229 Scorpion

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

10, 15

$240

P-229 Scorpion

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.96 kg

10, 12

$313

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-228

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-229 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-229 (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P-229 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P-229 (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

P-229 Sport

SA

3

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

14

P-229 Scorpion (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P-229 Scorpion (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

SiG-Sauer P-230

     Notes: A lightweight, easily concealable automatic pistol, the P230 has found its way into a number of European police arsenals. Some Luftwaffe flight crews also carry it.  Two versions are available, the standard one with a light alloy frame, and a heavier stainless steel model.  The P-230 originally came in .32 ACP, .380 ACP, and 9mm Ultra chamberings, but the .32 ACP version was dropped from production in 1994, and the 9mm Ultra version was dropped in 1996.  There is, however, a training version chambered for .22 Long Rifle ammunition.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-230 (Light Alloy)

.22 Long Rifle

0.37 kg

10

$88

P-230 (Stainless Steel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.48 kg

10

$88

P-230 (Light Alloy)

.32 ACP

0.43 kg

8

$120

P-230 (Stainless Steel)

.32 ACP

0.55 kg

8

$120

P-230 (Light Alloy)

.380 ACP

0.46 kg

7

$139

P-230 (Stainless Steel)

.380 ACP

0.59 kg

7

$139

P-230 (Light Alloy)

9mm Ultra

0.47 kg

7

$144

P-230 (Stainless Steel)

9mm Ultra

0.6 kg

7

$143

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-230 (Light Alloy, .22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

P-230 (Stainless Steel, .22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

P-230 (Light Alloy, .32)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

8

P-230 (Stainless Steel, .32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

P-230 (Light Alloy, .380)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

9

P-230 (Stainless Steel, .380)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

P-230 (Light Alloy, 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

9

P-230 (Stainless Steel, 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

 

SiG-Sauer P-232

     Notes: This is basically a product-improved P-230, replacing that pistol in production, with first deliveries in 1997.  The P-232 comes in four versions: the standard P-232 with an all-blued finish and a light-alloy frame; the P-232 B&W, which is specifically designed to fire blanks; the P-232SL, which is made from stainless steel, and the P-232DAO, which has a light alloy frame and is double-action only.  (The B&W version will not be covered here.)  As with many SiG products, the standard sights are of the high-contrast 3-dot type, but tritium inlays are available upon request.  Normal grip plates are of textured plastic, but textured rubber grip plates are also available, as well as textured wrap-around rubber grips.  Checkered or smooth wooden grip plates are also an option.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P-232 is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-232

.32 ACP

0.52 kg

8

$121

P-232SL

.32 ACP

0.66 kg

8

$120

P-232DAO

.32 ACP

0.51 kg

8

$121

P-232

.380 ACP

0.5 kg

7

$140

P-232SL

.380 ACP

0.64 kg

7

$140

P-232DAO

.380 ACP

0.49 kg

7

$140

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-232 (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

P-232SL (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

P-232DAO (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

P-232 (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

9

P-232SL (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

P-232DAO (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

9

 

SiG-Sauer P-238

    Notes: The P-238 is a line of pocket pistols, most of which differ only in finish and grip plate composition.  Finishes include two-tone anodized frame with stainless steel slide, SiG-Sauer’s proprietary Nitron, rainbow titanium (visually very impressive, if not really tactical – though the titanium-plated finish is very tough), the HD with an all stainless steel frame and slide (and heavier than the rest), the Liberty Edition with a Nitron finish and gold-inlaid engraving (designed specifically for the US market, as near the muzzle is the engraving “We the People”), and the Copperhead with a desert tan frame, Nitron slide, and gold inlaid engravings of a copperhead snake atop the slide in front of the rear sight and “Copperhead” near the muzzle. Other versions include the dehorned SAS, the P-238 Tactical Laser with, of course, a laser aiming module under the dust cover in front of the trigger guard, and the Equinox, with extra safety features and a Nitron frame, brushed stainless steel slide, and dark wood grips.  Most versions (except the Equinox, Tactical Laser, and HD) can be had with rosewood grips or polymer grips. The hammer is of the loop type, with a short beavertail (to prevent hammer bite, as the P-238 has no grip safety). Barrel length is a short 2.7 inches.  Operation is single-action.  Trigger pull is a bit heavy at 7.5-8.5 pounds, though the pull length is short.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P-238 is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-238

.380 ACP

0.43 kg

6

$131

P-238 HD

.380 ACP

0.57 kg

6

$131

P-238 Tactical Laser

.380 ACP

0.46 kg

6

$531

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-238/Tactical Laser

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

6

P-238 HD

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

 

SiG-Sauer P-224

     Notes: The P-224 is a commander-sized pistol, similar to the P-229, but in smaller calibers. The usual optional finishes and grip plates are available, as well as tritium inlays for the 3-dot sights. Operation is by DAO. The P-224 is primarily designed primarily for the US market (and to some extent Canada and Mexico), it is partially manufactured in SiGArms’ facilities in the US, and sold exclusively through SiGArms USA.  Currently, the P-224 is offered only in .40 Smith & Wesson, but by this time next year (September 2014), versions in 9mm Parabellum and .357 SiG will be available.  The magazines are small and the grips short; the magazines to not include a finger rest, so getting a good firing grip on the gun can be problematic.  However, the grip panels are a honeycomb pattern, and the frontstrap and rearstrap are finely checkered to aid in grip.  The controls are also heavily checkered and extended.  Due to the DAO operation, there is no slide lock and no grip safety; the hammer is exposed, but not spurred or checkered.  It does have internal safeties, such as a magazine safety, and firing pin safety.  The sights are called SiGLite sights, and are basically low-profile sights with 3-dot tritium inlays and white spots.  The P-224 is designed for concealment, and has a short 3.5-inch barrel.  The frame is finished to look like polymer, but it is actually light alloy; the slide is carbon steel, and the whole is finished in Nitrite with the frame having a hard anodized finish. The standard magazines hold 10 rounds, but the P-224 can use most P-229 magazines as well.

     Variants include the SAS (SiG Anti-Snag, which uses exclusively double-stack magazines and is largely dehorned, and itself can be had with a DAK trigger or a SRT (Short Reset Trigger.)  The Nickel is basically the same as the standard P-2243, but has a nickel-plated slide.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-224

9mm Parabellum

0.62 kg

10, 12, 13

$234

P-224

.357 SiG

0.66 kg

10, 12

$261

P-224

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.72 kg

10, 12

$531

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-224 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

P-224 (.357)

SA

3

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

P-224 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

SiG-Sauer P-245

     Notes: This compact pistol was designed for those who favored a heavier caliber, firing .45ACP.  It is a heavily-modified P-220 using the .45 ACP round.  Designed primarily for the US market (and to some extent Canada and Mexico), it is partially manufactured in SiGArms’ facilities in the US, and sold exclusively through SiGArms USA.  The standard magazines sold with the P-245 are single-stack magazines holding 6 rounds, but it can also use M-1911-type magazines and even a double-stack 10-round magazine.  Normal operation is DA/SA, but a DAO version is available upon request.  The usual optional finishes and grip plates are available, as well as tritium inlays for the 3-dot sights.

     Twilight 2000 Story: This pistol does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-245

.45 ACP

0.78 kg

6, 7, 8, 10

$230

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-245

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

 

SiG-Sauer P-250

     Notes: The P-250 (also known as the P-250DCc) is one of SiGArms’ newest products.  One of the purposes of the P-250 is to incorporate a number of “mature innovations” into a pistol, some of are in fact quite unusual and innovative.  Most of these innovations are internal and complicated to explain, so I hope you will forgive me if I simplify (and in some cases, oversimplify) many of these features.

     The “frame” of the P-250 is more than just a frame; virtually the entire lower portion of the P-250 is, in fact, a single piece of shaped, high-strength composite polymer.  This includes checkered front and backstraps as well as side stippling (the frontstrap is actually checkered and ribbed), a thumb rest at the top of the grip, a dust cover with a molded-in MIL-STD-1913 rail, and a beveled magazine well.  The grips can further be modified for size with three add-on backstraps. To further strengthen the frame, the P-250 has a stainless steel sub-frame.  The slide, barrel, and working components are of steel.  The slide rails are quite tiny, but do the job very well and keep the slide moving smoothly.  The mechanism itself is an optimized DAO system; it’s not quite a DAK trigger, but follow-up trigger pulls are still lighter than the initial 6-pound trigger weight.  The hammer has no exposed spur, and appears only when the slide in back.  The P-250 uses an external extractor as well as a slightly lowered ejection port.  Sights are of the three-dot type, which are removable (though the standard sights are fixed).  There are no manual safeties, but several passive ones.  Other controls are ambidextrous. 

     The P-250 is very modular in its construction; barrels, slides, frames, controls, and backstraps can be exchanged virtually at will, and finishes include black nitron, stainless steel, Digital Desert Camo, All-Terrain Digital Camo, and two-tone (stainless slide and nitron frame.  The trigger may also be of one of two lengths. The disassembly takes virtually no tools, and can be done in seemingly record time for a pistol.  Barrel lengths are 4.7, 3.9, or 3.6 inches, called the Full Size, Compact, and Subcompact respectively.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P-250 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-250 Full Size

9mm Parabellum

0.83 kg

10, 17

$249

P-250 Full Size

.357 SiG

0.83 kg

10, 14

$276

P-250 Full Size

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.83 kg

10, 14

$324

P-250 Full Size

.45 ACP

0.83 kg

10

$411

P-250 Compact

9mm Parabellum

0.76 kg

10, 15

$240

P-250 Compact

.357 SiG

0.76 kg

10, 13

$268

P-250 Compact

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.76 kg

10, 13

$315

P-250 Compact

.45 ACP

0.76 kg

9

$401

P-250 Subcompact

9mm Parabellum

0.71 kg

10, 12

$237

P-250 Subcompact

.357 SiG

0.71 kg

9

$265

P-250 Subcompact

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.71 kg

9

$312

P-250 Subcompact

.45 ACP

0.71 kg

6

$398

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-250 Full Size (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P-250 Full Size (.357)

SA

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

P-250 Full Size (.40)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

P-250 Full Size (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

13

P-250 Compact (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-250 Compact (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P-250 Compact (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P-250 Compact (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

P-250 Subcompact (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

P-250 Subcompact (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P-250 Subcompact (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

P-250 Subcompact (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

 

SiG-Sauer P-290

     Notes: The P-290 is a new (as of January 2011) compact 9mm pistol from SiG-Sauer.  SiG-Sauer calls is a sub-compact pistol, but compared to other pistols of its ilk, it falls into the compact realm of size, being a bit too large for the sub-compact appellation. Operation is by tilting barrel and locked breech, and uses DAO trigger action.  The frame is of polymer, with a non-slip finish for the grip. The slide is steel, with low-profile cocking grooves in the rear of the slide.  The grip panels are held on by a pin at the bottom of the frame, allowing access to the grip for cleaning, or to accommodate one of two interchangeable backstraps. Future plans include replacement of the polymer grip panels with aluminum or wood. Sights are low-profile SiGlite night sights or non-glowing sights, and both the front and rear sights are in dovetails so that, though they are fixed, some adjustments can be made.  Though the design is new, and some adjustments are still to be made, the trigger has a bit of overtravel though it breaks clean and smooth.  The trigger action does not allow for the immediate refiring of a dud; one must remove the dud by racking the slide before the weapon can be fired again.  Future plans call for a restrike capability.  The magazines are small, as in keeping with the entire pistol; however, the 8-round magazine projects somewhat from the bottom of the grip, and it has a sculpted baseplate with a filler.  (This magazine is proprietary to the weapon.) The magazine catch is reversible. The P-290 has single MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the trigger guard is enlarged, allowing for the attachment of a tactical light or a laser pointer.  SiG manufactures a special laser for the P-290, specially designed to fit the rail and trigger guard.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P-290 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-290

9mm Parabellum

0.58 kg

6, 8