GDLS Bison

    Notes:  The Bison is, like the LAV-25, based on the 8x8 version of Swiss MOWAG Piranha II chassis, which GDLS calls the LAV II chassis.  In many ways, the Bison and the LAV-25 are merely different variants of the same vehicle, though there are many differences that merit the Bison a separate entry.  The Bison for the most part replaced the Grizzly in Canadian service, as the Bison offers much more cargo and troop carrying capability.  The Bison entered Canadian service in 1990; they have 199, and Australia also operates the Bison, using 97 of them.  (They call them the ASLAV-PC.) A dozen of the ISC version were sold to the Texas Army National Guard’s 49th AD to support antidrug operations in the mid-2000s (not normally armed); I have not been able to determine if they have been used in any other capacity.  The Bison has seen combat service with both the Canadians and Australians in Afghanistan (as the ASLAV Type II).  However, Canadian Bisons have been replaced with the newer LAV III in the APC role, and all Canadian Bisons reworked into specialist versions, including command post carriers, armored medical vehicles, EW and commo vehicles, maintenance, and combat engineer vehicles.

     The basic form of the Bison is of a large 8x8 vehicle, wedge-nosed at the front and boxy behind the nose.  The front half of the vehicle deck is about 200mm lower than the rear half; this front section houses the driver on the front left and the engine on the right, and the right side has a large muffler and exhaust system with the exhaust pipe running towards the top of the higher section.  At the front of the raised section is a commander’s cupola with a pintle mount for a machinegun. The rear section has a large, flat roof with stowage bins on the sides and a large flat section on the rear of this section where outsized cargoes can be tied or locked down, or a collection of smaller equipment.  The rear section of the roof also has several large hatches for troops to stand in them.  The rear of the vehicle has a powered ramp with a door in it. The interior of the vehicle is novel – it is designed especially with modularity in mind, and the floor and walls have runners, wheels, and lock-down and tie-down points to allow the Bison to be quickly configured and reconfigured in many ways.  The sides and roof likewise have many points where things can be tied down for carrying.  (It was definitely designed with grunts in mind!)  A common add-on is a wire cutter to protect the driver and commander, and an air conditioning unit (the air conditioning unit generally takes up the space of one troop); the Bison also has a collective NBC system for the crew and troops inside.  On each side of the hull near the front are a cluster of four smoke grenade launchers.  A spare tire is often strapped to the front of the vehicle’s nose, particularly when amphibious operation is not expected.

     Power is provided by a Detroit Diesel 6V53T turbocharged diesel developing 275 horsepower, coupled to an automatic transmission and conventional driver’s controls.  The Bison is amphibious with a minimum of preparation (about 2 minutes), and propulsion in the water is by a pair of waterjets steered by rudders. As stated, drive is 8x8, with the front four and rear four sets of wheels able to steer independently to tighten steering radius.  The tires are run-flat.  Construction is largely of steel, with a Kevlar anti-spalling liner.  The Bison can take a version of QinetiQ’s LAST appliqué armor kit, which includes additional internal anti-spalling panels.  The standard APC version, the ISC (Infantry Section Carrier) has various boxes and lockers for weapons and troop supplies both internally and externally.  In the front of the hull is a winch with a capacity of 6.8 tons and 100 meters of cable.

 

APC-Type Variants

     The Bison Ambulance has extra large stowage boxes on the upper hull sides, and an air conditioning unit is attached to the rear deck stand in an armored housing. Internally, the Bison Ambulance is configured to carry medical supplies and patients.  There are plenty of lockers and bins for supplies, including an oxygen administration kit, a defibrillator, a small refrigerator and a heater for blankets, a hot plate, an 80-liter water tank, the equivalent of one doctor’s medical bag, 20 personal medical kits, and an assortment of splints, cravats, space blankets, and bandages.  The Bison Ambulance can handle four stretcher cases, 8 sitting cases, or two stretcher cases and four sitting casualties, as well as a medic.  (The driver and commander are also normally medics.) The Bison Ambulance is unarmed.

     The Bison CPV is equipped with two short-range, two medium-range, and two long-range radios, one of which is data-capable.  The Bison CPV has a ruggedized laptop computer as well as a modern Battlefield Management System, including GPS with an inertial navigation backup.  The commander’s cupola is retained, though the ammunition load is decreased. A tent can be erected at the rear to double the work space, and a folding table and chairs are carried to assist in this. A hand-held thermal imager, image intensifier, and laser rangefinder are provided.

     The Bison Commo Vehicle is equipped with advanced communications capabilities.  In addition to the radios for the command version above, the Bison Commo has an additional long-range radio as well as a SATCOM radio and terminal.  It has a tactical switchboard, carries a total of 20 field telephones along with 1000 meters of commo wire, and spare parts for commo gear.  The Commo Vehicle has a computer to tie together functions.

     The Bison EW vehicle is a generalist sort of EW vehicle, optimized primarily for radio jamming, though it does have some minor radar jamming capability.  LF, HF, and VHF bands can be jammed at standard chances at a range of 50 kilometers; GSR radar can be jammed at a range of 10 kilometers, though degradation is one level less than normal. The EW vehicle can also detect and locate such radio broadcasts within 25 kilometers, and GSR emission within 10 kilometers. The EW Vehicle has a computer to tie together functions.

 

The ASLAV Type II

     The ASLAV-PC is similar to the Bison ISC, but the commander’s station is inside the armor envelope and the commander’s external station is replaced by a Kongsberg Protector RWS armed with either an M-2HB or a Mk 19 AGL.  The commander controls the RWS through a downlinked monitor, as well as being able to use the RWS’s night vision gear through this monitor.  It carries less troops, but it otherwise like the Bison ISC.

     The ASLAV-C is basically the same vehicle as the Bison CPV, though for Afghanistan use the commander’s station is often replaced with the same RWS as on the ASLAV-PC.

     The ASLAV-S (Surveillance) is a specialized scout/surveillance vehicle equipped with enhanced night vision devices, a laser rangefinder, a day TV camera which can be slaved to the thermal imager, and a GSR (usually the French RASIT or US-designed AMSTAR).  The radar has a range of 10 kilometers.  All these sensors are mounted on a 10-meter mast which can also operate in the lowered position.  Two medium-range and two-long-range radios are included, one of which is data-capable. The interior is rearranged to gather, collate, and transmit the information it finds, including a computer with ample storage space, and crew is limited to that necessary for operations.  The ASLAV-S is equipped with a conventional commander’s station, though armed with a heavier machinegun.

     The ASLAV-A (Ambulance) is equipped with space for four stretcher cases, two stretcher cases and four seated patients, or 8 seated patients, and has a medic.  The commander and driver are also medics. The ASLAV-A carries an oxygen administration kit, a defibrillator, a small heater for blankets, and small hot plate, a small (10-liter) later tank, and the equivalent of a doctor’s medical kit and 15 personal medical kits.  An assortment of bandages, slings, cravats, splints, and other such gear are also carried.  Unlike most medical vehicles, the ASLAV-S is armed.

     The Australians do not use the LAST kit.  They are radiologically shielded, however.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This vehicle was in common use in Canada during the Twilight War; some of them were also used by the US Marines, and a dozen of the ISC version were sold to the Texas Army National Guard for use in urban drug raids; these were used as regular personnel carriers during the war, and armed with M-60 machineguns.  The Australians also used 38 ASLAV Type IIs, of various types. (No ASLAV-Cs are equipped with an RWS in the Twilight 2000 timeline.) The Bison CPVs were the primary command vehicle of Canadian forces, were used in a limited amount by the US Marines (armed with M-240 machineguns), and, fitted with extra ground-to-air radios, were the vehicle of choice for Canadian FALO teams.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Bison ISC

$29,115

D, A

2 tons

12.9 tons

2+9

8

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison ISC (LAST)

$30,703

D, A

1.7 tons

14.2 tons

2+9

8

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison Ambulance

$33,483

D, A

1 ton

13.4 tons

*

9

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison Ambulance (LAST)

$35,071

D, A

700 kg

14.7 tons

*

9

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison CPV/ASLAV-C

$433,138

D, A

1 ton

13.7 tons

2+4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison CPV (LAST)

$434,726

D, A

700 kg

15 tons

2+4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison Commo

$230,151

D, A

1 ton

13 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison Commo (LAST)

$231,739

D, A

700 kg

14.3 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison EW

$394,961

D, A

1 ton

13 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Bison EW (LAST)

$396,549

D, A

700 kg

14.3 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

ASLAV-PC

$46,664

D, A

1.7 tons

13.5 tons

2+7

8

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

ASLAV-C w/RWS

$491,703

D, A

850 kg

13.7 tons

2+4

11

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

ASLAV-S

$451,553

D, A

720 kg

14.5 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (Mast), Thermal Imaging (Mast), GSR (Mast)

Shielded

ASLAV-A

$45,626

D, A

950 kg

13.5 tons

*

9

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Bison ISC

159/50

37/18/4

300

144

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR3**

Bison ISC (LAST)

148/74

34/17/3

300

159

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR4***

Bison Ambulance

153/48

36/17/4

300

150

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR3**

Bison Ambulance (LAST)

140/44

32/16/3

300

164

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR4***

Bison CPV

153/48

36/17/4

300

153

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR3**

Bison CPV (LAST)

137/43

32/15/3

300

167

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR4***

Bison Commo/EW

158/50

37/18/4

300

145

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR3**

Bison Commo/EW (LAST)

143/45

33/16/3

300

160

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR4***

ASLAV-PC

152/48

35/17/4

300

151

CiH

W(6)

TF4  TS2  TR2  HF6  HS4  HR3****

ASLAV-C

153/48

36/17/4

300

153

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR3****

ASLAV-C w/RWS

143/45

33/16/3

300

160

CiH

W(6)

TF4  TS2  TR2  HF6  HS4  HR3****

ASLAV-S

142/45

33/16/3

300

147

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR3****

ASLAV-A

152/48

35/17/4

300

151

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR3****

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Bison ISC

None

None

L-6 (C)

1620x7.62mm

Bison CPV/Commo/EW

None

None

L-6 (C)

1000x7.62mm

ASLAV-PC/ASLAV-C w/RWS

+2

Fair

M-2HB or Mk 19 (C)

1000x.50 or 325x40mm

ASLAV-C/ASLAV-S/ASLAV-A

None

None

M-2HB (C)

1000x.50

*See Notes for Crew and passenger capacity.

**Hull Floor AV is 3.

***Hull Floor AV is 5; Hull Roof AV is 3.

****Hull Floor and Roof AV are 3.

 

GDLS Grizzly

     Notes:  Like the LAV-25, the Grizzly is based on the MOWAG Piranha; however, the Grizzly is based on the 6x6 rather than the 8x8 version of that vehicle.  They also predate the LAV-25 in Canadian service by about a half a decade, being first seen in service in 1979.  Some 270 were built for Canadian Armed Forces.  The Bison, above, began to replace the Grizzly in the early 1990s, as the Bison was a larger vehicle which offered more cargo and troop carrying capabilities, as well as offering a degree of utility the Grizzly could not deliver.  Aside from Canada, the Uruguayans use 44 of them, though the Uruguayans opted to not use the turrets, replacing the opening with plating and a smaller commander’s cupola with a pintle-mounted weapon.  The Croatians operate one Grizzly, which they captured during the IFOR mission in Bosnia.  The RCMP uses two unarmed Grizzlies with their Emergency Response team, and the Edmonton Police Service uses one unarmed Grizzly.  These retain their turrets, and the turrets mount extra observation and surveillance gear, such as LLTV and video recorders, as well as a PA system; the former gunner’s station controls these surveillance and PA systems.  The Grizzly is related to the Cougar reconnaissance vehicle and the Husky ARV.

     In 2005, 100 Grizzlies were loaded to African Union Peacekeepers for use in the Darfur region; as the turret of the Grizzly is a Cadillac Gage turret, and the US initially opposed the Darfur mission, the Grizzlies were at first sent without their turrets in the summer of 2005 and the opening plated over.  The Sudanese government opposed the peacekeeping mission altogether, and training was necessary for the African crews, and it was not until November that the Grizzlies became operational in Darfur.  By then, the Canadians had permission to use the turrets from the US, and the Grizzlies carried out their actual missions in Darfur with their turrets installed. The use of Grizzlies in Darfur became a bone of contention; while only one Grizzly was lost in combat, the crews were regarded as too poorly trained in their use to use them effectively, and they were withdrawn in 2006.  The Uruguayan Grizzlies were taken from these loaned vehicles after refurbishment and the desired modifications made.

     The Grizzly hull bears a great resemblance to the LAV-25, though it is a 6x6 instead of an 8x8 vehicle and is shorter in length.  The hull sides are moderately sloped, and the front sharply sloped. The driver is in the front left, with the engine to his right.  The driver has three vision blocks to his front, one of which can be removed and replaced by a night vision block.  He has a conventional driver control set.  The turret is small, and is a modified form of one fitted to some variants of the Cadillac Gage LAV-150 and LAV-300.  It is armed with heavy machinegun and a coaxial medium machinegun.  A few also had a pintle-mounted machinegun on the commander’s cupola, though this is not reflected in the stats below.  The turret has a commander’s cupola, but there is no hatch for the gunner. There is a cluster of four smoke grenade launchers on each side of the turret. (Uruguayan versions have the smoke grenade launchers shifted to either side of the upper glacis.) The rear troop compartment is accessed via a pair of rear doors of through hatches on the rear deck.  Two firing ports are found on each side of the troop compartment, and one in the right rear door.  The Grizzly uses a Detroit Diesel 6V63T turbocharged diesel for power (the same as on the Bison), and is coupled to an automatic transmission.  The Grizzly can be fitted with a version of the LAST kit, which can be applied to both the hull and turret; the versions deployed to Darfur did not use this, nor do Uruguayan versions or police versions. Grizzlies were originally amphibious, propelled in the water by propellers and steered by rudders; the propulsion system proved to be troublesome and prone to breakdowns, and after a few years, was removed (though the bilge pumps remained, disabled). Tires are run flat and the Grizzly has an off-road suspension, with run-flat tires.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Grizzly

$62,679

D, A

900 kg

10.5 tons

3+6

6

Passive IR (D, G)

Enclosed

Grizzly (LAST)

$64,681

D, A

650 kg

11.5 tons

3+6

6

Passive IR (D, G)

Enclosed

Grizzly (Uruguayan)

$27,068

D, A

1.1 tons

9.8 tons

2+7

6

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Grizzly (Police)

$26,261

D, A

1 ton

10.4 tons

3+6

6

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G)

Enclosed

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Grizzly

201/101

52/26/5

204

117

Trtd

W(4)

TF4  TS3  TR3  HF6  HS4  HR3

Grizzly (LAST)

188/94

43/22/4

204

128

Trtd

W(4)

TF6Sp  TS5Sp  TR3  HF8Sp  HS6Sp  HR3*

Grizzly (Uruguayan)

212/108

55/27/6

204

109

Trtd

W(4)

HF6  HS4  HR3

Grizzly (Police)

203/102

52/26/5

204

116

Trtd

W(4)

TF4  TS3  TR3  HF6  HS4  HR3

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Grizzly

+1

Fair

M-2HB, L-6

1000x.50, 4400x7.62mm

Grizzly (Uruguayan)

None

None

L-6 (C)

2200x7.62mm

*Hull floor AV is 5; hull and turret roof AV is 3.

 

GDLS LAV-25

     Notes:  The LAV-25 is based on the Canadian version of the Swiss Piranha II 8x8 APC, called the LAV II chassis by GDLS.  The primary customers of the LAV-25 are the US Marines, who have bought 2036 of them as of 2010.  Other users include the Saudi Arabian National Guard, the Iraqi Army (a recent acquisition), New Zealand (who call it the NZLAV) and the Australians, who use a highly-customized version called the ASLAV.  The US Army also tested, but ultimately did not procure, the LAV-25 for use by the 82nd Airborne division and later for what became the Stryker Brigades.  The Canadians also use the LAV-25, though only in the reconnaissance Coyote configuration. In addition to the standard LAV-25, several specialized variants of the LAV-25 exist, ranging from scout versions to ARVs to mortar carriers.  (Only APC-type variants will be included in this entry.) The LAV-25 uses the same chassis as the Bison (above), and in many ways, the two vehicles may be regarded as variants of each other.

     As a variant of the Piranha, the LAV-25 has the wedge-shaped nose and moderately-sloped sides of the basic chassis, and an 8x8 suspension with front and rear sets of wheels with independent steering, giving the LAV-25 a surprisingly small turning radius.  For standard road use, the LAV-25 normally uses only the four rear wheels as drive wheels, switching to 8-wheel drive off road.  The LAV-25 is amphibious with a minimum of preparation (about 2 minutes), and is propelled in the water by propellers and steered by rudders.  Power is provided by the standard LAV II engine, the Detroit Diesel 6V53T 275-horsepower turbocharged diesel.  This is coupled to an automatic transmission and the driver has a conventional drive control setup.  The driver is located on the front left and has three vision blocks to his front.

     The turret is to the rear of the driver, slightly forward of center; it carries a commander and gunner, with the commander having a cupola with all-around vision blocks and the gunner having a hatch with vision blocks to his front, left, and rear.  The sights and night vision devices are provided for the gunner, but available to the commander, and he has auxiliary controls for the autocannon and coax. Though at first on US Marine versions, the commander did not have his own weapon, these were increasingly fitted after Desert Storm and now virtually all of them are armed with a commander’s machinegun.  Other countries used commander’s machineguns from the start.  The turret is armed with an autocannon and coaxial machinegun, though sighting equipment and stabilization is sketchy.  Half the ammunition for the autocannon and coaxial machinegun is stowed in the turret, with the rest being elsewhere in the vehicle.  A cluster of six smoke grenade launchers is found on each side of the turret on US Marine versions; clusters of four are used by other countries.  The troop compartment is at the rear and normally carries six troops, though seven can be accommodated with a little more squeezing.  They enter and exit through doors in the rear of the vehicle.  Two firing points are found on each side and one in each rear door; these are normally designed specifically for the small arms used by the country in question, though in general they can accommodate the M-16/M-4 series, the Steyr AUG and its variants, the Minimi and M-249 and their variants, and the MAG and M-240 and their variants. The LAV-25 can take a version of the LAST appliqué armor kit.

     Starting in the 1990s, US Marine LAV-25s went through a SLEP (Service Life Extension Program), becoming the LAV-25A1.  Improvements included the addition of a ballistic computer, better gun stabilization, the addition of a commander’s machinegun (on US Marine models), and a general overhaul of the vehicle.  Virtually all LAV-25s currently fielded in the world today are LAV-25A1s.  An air conditioner makes squeezing the seventh troop or Marine into the LAV-25 impossible. Some parts of the Phase I upgrades are also being applied to other LAV-25 versions.

     Currently, US Marine LAV-25s are undergoing another update program, which started in 2005; this was at first called the LAV-25A2, then simply the LAV-A2.  This is taking place in two phases; Phase I adds additional Kevlar anti-spalling liners inside and makes the LAST kit standard.  It also improves the fire suppression equipment and upgrades the suspension, improving off-road capability.  Unfortunately, this makes the LAV-A2 too heavy and unbalanced for reliable amphibious operations, and these features are being deleted on the LAV-A2.  Phase II adds thermal imaging as well as a laser rangefinder, and an improved fire control computer.  It further improves gun stabilization. Phase II upgrades began in 2007, but are progressing slowly.  The suspension and fire suppression upgrades will also be applied to other LAV-25 versions.

 

Other Variants

     The LAV-LOG (also called simply the LAV-L) is turretless and has a raised superstructure.  It is used as an armored truck of sorts, i.e., a logistics carrier.  It is used only by the US Marines.  The resulting vehicle is externally similar to the Bison, but internally, it is very different.  Instead of the turret, the LAV-LOG has a commander’s cupola on the front center of the raised portion which is armed with a pintle-mounted weapon. The roof of the raised portion has large hatches to give easy access for the loading and unloading of supplies, and a crane over the left rear wheel with a capacity of 550 kilograms assist in this.  The rear doors are replaced with one large door, and the rear face also has a ramp.  The rear opening is large enough for the LAV-LOG to be loaded by small forklifts. The floor and walls have a set of rollers and tie-down and lock-down points to allow the LAV-LOG to carry bulk supplies or loose supplies.  Removable bench seats can be added to make the LAV-LOG an ad hoc APC; these allow 8 Marines to be carried.

     The LAV-C2 is the command version of the LAV-25 series, and is roughly analogous to the M-577.  Externally, the LAV-C2 is similar to the LAV-LOG, though it has several antennas and does not have the crane.  As with most such command vehicles, the LAV-C2 carries an extensive radio fit, including two short-range, two medium-range, and two long-range radios, one of which is data-capable.   A map board, plotting supplies, and office-type supplies are carried. A ruggedized laptop computer is carried.  A BMS system upgrade is being applied to the LAV-C2, and is included in the stats below.  A hand-held image intensifier, thermal imager, and laser rangefinder is included. Two hatches are found on the rear deck, and the front of the raised area has two hatches, one for the vehicle commander near the front center and one for the senior command member to his right.  A tent may be extended at the rear of the vehicle to double the working area, and a folding table and three folding chairs are carried. A LAV-C2 with a LAST kit is too heavy for amphibious operations, as is the LAVA1-C2.

     The LAV-MEWSS (Mobile Electronic Warfare Support System) is a version of the LAV-25 chassis packed with equipment for radio and radar jamming functions. The LAV-MEWSS’ equipment is capable of jamming all radio frequencies, though only two bands at a time, within 30 km, to a point that all radio skill level checks are three levels more difficult – it is a powerful, though short-range, ECM signal.  It can also jam radar within 30 km, degrading radar by two levels of effectiveness.  As a secondary function, the LAV-MEWSS carries a ground-surveillance radar and an artillery counterbattery radar.  Four long-range radios are carried, and the radio operator is usually an intelligence specialist. Firing ports are plated over. The LAV-MEWSS with a LAST kit is not amphibious, nor is the LAV-MEWSSA1

 

The Coyote

     The Coyote is a scout/surveillance version of the LAV-25. It is used only by Canada. The Coyote was designed to replace the M-114 Lynx in Canadian service. No dismount troops are carried, and most of the rear is taken up by a variety of reconnaissance and surveillance gear.  The Coyote is fitted with thermal vision, a laser designator, a ground-surveillance radar with an extendable mast 10 meters high and a range of 10 km (it is a small radar), a video camera and VCR (linked to all visual and surveillance devices, and later replaced with digital storage), a digital compass system, a GPS system, and chemical and radiation detection equipment. The radio fit includes one short-range, one medium-range, and two long-range radios, one of which is data-capable. The radar mast also mounts a thermal imager and image intensifier, as well as an LLTV camera. The Coyote can detect and attempt to intercept radio broadcasts within 50 kilometers, and an onboard computer helps analyze and record collected data. In addition, there is a front-mounted winch with a capacity of 6804kg.

     The Coyote is often equipped with the LAST kit, but firing ports are plated over.  The extra equipment on the Coyote unbalances it, rendering it incapable of amphibious operations, and that equipment is not fitted to the Coyote.

 

The ASLAV

     The ASLAV is somewhat heavier than the standard LAV-25.  This is primarily due to the inclusion of an air conditioner, slightly increased armor (especially the floor), and radiation shielding.  The ASLAV also usually employs a wire cutter on a pole to protect the driver, commander, and gunner. Rounds for the autocannon are increased, and for the machineguns decreased. Other than this, the basic ASLAV is almost identical to the basic LAV-25.  Phase 1 was the initial testing program; Phase 2 was the initial acquisition program.  Phase 3 will increase the amount of locally-produced components, as well as fit the ASLAV with a laser rangefinder, and thermal imager as well as improved electrical components. More ASLAVs of all versions will also be acquired under Phase III, and the new ASLAVs will be built to the Phase III standards. The Type I ASLAV is used primarily as a scout vehicle rather than an APC, though it does carry a scout dismount team.

     The Type II and Type III ASLAV is based on the Bison, and is found in that entry above (for the ASLAV Type II) and eventually on the Canadian Engineer Vehicles (for the ASLAV Type III).  The Australians do not use the LAST kit.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: In the Twilight 2000 timeline, the LAV-25 is used in large numbers by the US Marines. Some later modifications such as digital storage on the Coyote were not applied to the versions used in the Twilight War.  The LAV-A2 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline, and only about half the LAV-25s are LAV-25A1s.  The US Marines employed 12 Coyotes, and the US Army seven. The Canadians also made some use of the LAV-25 APC, mostly inside of Canada herself; this is in addition to the Coyotes they used elsewhere in the world.  The US Army used them in the 9th Motorized Infantry Division, as well as in several units raised later in the war and as replacement vehicles for vehicles such as APCs and scout vehicles.  LAV-25s could be found in small numbers in Western US-based units, and in somewhat larger numbers in use by the Texas Army National Guard’s 49th AD.  The Australians employ some 150 ASLAVs, mostly of the standard configuration, which do get used as APCs in some cases; they also have some 25% of their ASLAV force being of Type II and Type III ASLAVs.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

LAV-25

$80,322

D, A

1.8 tons

12.8 tons

3+6

8

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G)

Enclosed

LAV-25 (LAST)

$83,596

D, A

1.4 tons

14.5 tons

3+6

8

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G)

Enclosed

LAV-25A1

$125,789

D, A

1.4 tons

14.6 tons

3+6

8

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G)

Enclosed

LAV-A2

$166,489

D, A

1.3 tons

14.8 tons

3+6

8

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G), Thermal Imaging (G)

Enclosed

LAV-LOG

$36,085

D, A

2.2 tons

12 tons

2 (+8)

8

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-LOG (LAST)

$38,516

D, A

2.1 tons

13.5 tons

2 (+8)

6

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-LOGA1

$40,947

D, A

2.1 tons

13.6 tons

2 (+8)

8

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-A2-LOG

$41,957

D, A

2 tons

13.8 tons

2 (+8)

8

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-C2

$460,265

D, A

900 kg

13.5 tons

2+3

10

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-C2 (LAST)

$463,696

D, A

600 kg

15 tons

2+3

10

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-C2A1

$468,223

D, A

600 kg

15.1 tons

2+3

10

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-A2-C2

$469,223

D, A

900 kg

15.3 tons

2+3

10

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-MEWSS

$639,615

D, A

600 kg

13.8 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-MEWSS (LAST)

$642,046

D, A

600 kg

15.3 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-MEWSSA1

$645,477

D, A

600 kg

15.4 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

LAV-A2-MEWSS

$647,577

D, A

500 kg

15.6 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

Coyote

$501,403

D, A

750 kg

13.4 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D, G. C), Image Intensification (G, C, Mast), Thermal Imaging (G, C, Mast), GSR (Mast)

Enclosed

Coyote (LAST)

$504,677

D, A

325 kg

15.1 tons

4

11

Passive IR (D, G. C), Image Intensification (G, C, Mast), Thermal Imaging (G, C, Mast), GSR (Mast)

Enclosed

ASLAV

$61,759

D, A

1.6 tons

      13.2 tons                   

3+6

8

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G)

Shielded

ASLAV Phase III

$76,259

D, A

1.6 tons

      13.2 tons                   

3+6

8

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G), Thermal Imaging

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

LAV-25

172/87

40/20/5

300

144

Trtd

W(6)

TF6  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS4  HR4

LAV-25 (LAST)

158/80

37/18/5

300

163

Trtd

W(6)

TF8Sp  TS6Sp  TR4  HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-25A1

157/79

37/18/5

300

145

Trtd

W(6)

TF8Sp  TS6Sp  TR4  HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-A2

155/88

36/20

300

147

Trtd

W(6)

TF8Sp  TS6Sp  TR4  HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-LOG

184/93

43/21/5

300

135

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR4

LAV-LOG (LAST)

163/82

38/19/5

300

152

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-LOGA1

162/81

38/19/5

300

153

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-A2-LOG

160/90

38/21

300

155

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-C2

164/83

38/19

300

145

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR4

LAV-C2 (LAST)

145/74

34/17

300

164

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-C2A1

144/74

34/17

300

165

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-A2-C2

142/82

34/19

300

167

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-MEWSS

161/81

37/19/4

300

154

Stnd

W(6)

HF6  HS4  HR4

LAV-MEWSS (LAST)

142/72

33/17

300

174

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-MEWSSA1

141/71

33/17

300

175

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV-A2-MEWSS

139/79

32/19

300

177

Stnd

W(6)

HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

Coyote

166/84

39/19

300

150

Trtd

W(6)

TF6  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS4  HR4

Coyote (LAST)

152/73

33/17

300

169

Trtd

W(6)

TF8Sp  TS6Sp  TR4  HF10Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

ASLAV/Phase III

168/85

39/20/5

300

147

Trtd

W(6)

TF7  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS4  HR4*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

LAV-25

+1

Basic

25mm M-242 ChainGun, L-6 or MAG or M-240, L-6 or MAG or M-240 (C)

630x25mm, 1620x7.62mm

LAV-25A1

+2

Fair

25mm M-242 ChainGun, M-240, M-240 (C)

630x25mm, 1620x7.62mm

LAV-A2

+4

Good

25mm M-242 ChainGun, M-240, M-240 (C)

630x25mm, 1620x7.62mm

LAV-LOG/C2/MEWSS

None

None

M-240 (C)

1000x7.62mm

Coyote

+3

Fair

25mm M-242 ChainGun, L-6, L-6 (C)

210x25mm, 1140x7.62mm

ASLAV

+1

Basic

25mm M-242 ChainGun, MAG, MAG (C)

720x25mm, 1500x7.62mm

ASLAV Phase III

+2

Fair

25mm M-242 ChainGun, MAG, MAG (C)

720x25mm, 1500x7.62mm

*Hull floor AV is 5; hull and turret roof AV is 3.

 

GDLS LAV III Kodiak

     Notes: The LAV III, called the Kodiak in Canadian service, replaced the Bison as an APC in Canadian service, and is also used by Saudi Arabia and New Zealand (who call it the NZLAV III).  The LAV III offers increased armor protection, the ability to take armor upgrades based on ceramic composite and bar/slat armor which dramatically increases protection without greatly increasing weight like the LAST kit, a strengthened undercarriage and suspension both for off-road performance and mine protection, and a collective NBC system, as well as air conditioning as standard.  The resulting vehicle is also not drastically larger than the LAV-25 (but it is larger), though interior room is improved.  The fire control, gun stabilization, and sights are improved, and some electronic aids are added.  There are a few variants in service, including an ATGM vehicle, an ISC version with a raised hull and an RWS instead of a turret, a CPV, an OPV (Observation Post Vehicle), and a combat engineer vehicle. In addition to Canada, Saudi Arabia employs 19 Kodiaks.

     The LAV III also forms the basis of the US Stryker APC.  This version will eventually have its own entry under US Wheeled APCs.

     The basic form of the Kodiak makes it look similar to the LAV-25, though the LAV III is noticeably more heavily built.  The turret mounts the same weapons as the LAV-25, but fire control and gun stabilization is greatly improved, and night vision equipment is dramatically better.  On each side of the turret are a cluster of four smoke grenade launchers. The gunner and commander have LCD screens displaying various information about the vehicle’s state, and the commander and driver also have access to a GPS and tactical navigation system (TACNAV) along with a digital compass.  The LCD monitors also display the view through the sights and vision devices to the gunner and commander. The commander has an independent thermal imager and image intensifier as well as a telescopic day sight, giving him a hunter/killer capability. The commander also has access to a 6-million candlepower searchlight with white light and IR channels.  The driver is in his customary place in the front left, and has standard driving controls.  The Kodiak is powered by a Caterpillar 3126 turbocharged diesel developing 350 horsepower, coupled to an automatic transmission.  The 8x8 suspension can be switched to 4x8 (with the rear set of wheels providing the power) to improve on-road performance; it is also beefed up to improve off-road performance.  All wheels have antilock brakes and run-flat tires, as well as a traction control system. In the front of the hull is a winch with a capacity of 6804 kg and 100 meters of cable. The LAV III is not amphibious.

     The troops enter and exit through a rear ramp with a door in it, and have two large hatches on the rear hull roof.  There are no firing ports. The crew and passengers are protected by an automatic fire detection and suppression system for the driver’s compartment, engine compartment, turret basket, and rear troop compartment.  The crew and passengers also have the protection of a collective NBC system, and Kodiak has a chemical agent detector and a radiation meter.  The Kodiak is radiologically protected. Armor is still of steel, though it is improved over that of the LAV-25. The Kodiak has a laser/radar warning receiver to alert the crew when they are being targeted. The crew and troops have air conditioning.

     The armor can be supplemented by a composite appliqué armor kit called MEXAS which provides excellent levels of protection without adding undue weight. The Kodiak can also be fitted with bar/slat armor around its hull to further foil HE-type rounds (Including HEAT); this acts as spaced armor with an AV of 1, and from some angles, gives a sort of “double spaced” effect (the 2D6 normally added to a hit are not added on, and then the hit is reduced by a further 2D6). The hull floor is especially strengthened; though it does not have the V-shape of true MRAPs, the design does to an extent channel away blasts, and troops and equipment inside suffer 10% less damage.  The bar/slat armor adds 300 kg to the weight of the vehicle and slows it by 2%, and increases fuel consumption by 2%. The Kodiak is not air-portable with the bar/slat armor in place.  The ramp is not covered by the bar/slat armor though the area immediately to the right and left of the ramp are – 25% of all rear-quarter hits will hit the bar/slat armor. The Kodiak employs thermal dampening technology which presents a -2 penalty to those trying to detect it by IR/thermal-based vision devices or when an IR-guided weapon tries to lock on.

     The relatively high center of gravity of the Kodiak has led to some possible problems on roads with soft sides or unstable terrain – 12 rollover accidents may have been caused by the high center of gravity in such terrain.

 

Other APC Versions

     The LAV III ISC is similar in concept to the Bison ISC, carrying a larger infantry squad and lacking the standard Kodiak turret.  Instead, the ISC is equipped with the German-designed Nanuk RWS, equipped with either an M-2HB or Mk 19 AGL.  The commander is inside the armor envelope, and controls his weapon and sees through the sights and night vision devices via a downlinked monitor.  The ISC has many of the other features of the Kodiak, including the GPS with TACNAV, vehicle state computer, laser/radar warning receiver, the chassis and suspension, and the front-mounted winch.  It can take its own version of the MEXAS appliqué armor package, as well as bar/slat armor. The ISC retains the smoke grenade clusters, though they are moved to the top front corners of the raised portion of the vehicle hull.

     The LAV III CPV is the command version of the ISC, and is equipped with two short-range, two medium-range, and two long-range radios, one of which is data-capable.  The Bison CPV has a ruggedized laptop computer as well as a modern Battlefield Management System, and also has the GPS and TACNAV system of the Kodiak.  The commander’s position is reduced to a cupola with a machinegun. A tent can be erected at the rear to double the work space, and a folding table and chairs are carried to assist in this. A hand-held thermal imager, image intensifier, and laser rangefinder are provided.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Kodiak replacement of the LAV-25 and Bison had just begun when the Twilight War began, and no more than 40 were produced for Canada in the Twilight 2000 timeline. 75% of these were standard Kodiaks, with the rest being a mix of ISCs and CPVs; OSV, ATGM, and engineer versions were not built. A few examples (about 12) of these vehicles were tested by the US Marines and taken into service when the war started.

     Merc 2000 Notes: The Kodiak began replacing the LAV-25 in Canadian and (partially) in US Marine service in 2006.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Kodiak

$316,312

D, A

2 tons

17 tons

3+7

9

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G, C), Thermal Imaging (G, C)

Shielded

Kodiak (MEXAS)

$319,849

D, A

1.7 tons

17.5 tons

3+7

9

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G, C), Thermal Imaging (G, C)

Shielded

LAV III ISC

$133,914

D, A

2.2 tons

16.6 tons

2+9

6

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

LAV III ISC (MEXAS)

$136,567

D, A

2.1 tons

17 tons

2+9

6

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

LAV III CPV

$366,488

D, A

1 ton

17.5 tons

2+4

10

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

LAV III CPV (MEXAS)

$369,141

D, A

800 kg

17.9 tons

2+4

10

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Kodiak

144/82

33/19

400

147

Trtd

W(6)

TF7Sp  TS6Sp  TR4  HF9Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

Kodiak (MEXAS)

140/80

32/18

400

151

Trtd

W(6)

TF10Cp  TS8Sp  TR4  HF12Cp  HS9Sp  HR5*

LAV III ISC

147/84

34/19

400

143

Stnd

W(6)

HF9Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV III ISC (MEXAS)

144/82

33/19

400

147

Stnd

W(6)

HF12Cp  HS9Sp  HR5*

LAV III CPV

140/80

32/18

400

151

Stnd

W(6)

HF9Sp  HS6Sp  HR5*

LAV III CPV (MEXAS)

137/78

31/18

400

155

Stnd

W(6)

HF12Cp  HS9Sp  HR5*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Kodiak

+4

Good

25mm M-242 ChainGun, L-6, L-6 (C)

845x25mm, 2175x7.62mm

LAV III ISC

+2

Fair

M-2HB or Mk 19 (C)

1250x.50 or 400x40mm

LAV CPV

None

None

L-6 (C)

1250x7.62mm

*Hull and Turret Roof AV is 3; Hull Floor AV is 5Sp.